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A path to tackle liver-stage parasites

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

No barriers to growing a row

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Drivers of the "Great Dying"

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Beating the heat by blending

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Making a practical valleytronics device

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Regulation of RAS by ubiquitination

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Cleaving a different function for p62

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Fire and grassland evolution

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Managing an unwelcome effect

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Keeping a toehold on the matrix

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Steering electrons in graphene

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Global aeroplankton dispersal

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Semiconducting polymer blends that exhibit stable charge transport at high temperatures

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Although high-temperature operation (i.e., beyond 150°C) is of great interest for many electronics applications, achieving stable carrier mobilities for organic semiconductors at elevated temperatures is fundamentally challenging. We report a general strategy to make thermally stable high-temperature semiconducting polymer blends, composed of interpenetrating semicrystalline conjugated polymers and high glass-transition temperature insulating matrices. When properly engineered, such polymer blends display a temperature-insensitive charge transport behavior with hole mobility exceeding 2.0 cm2/V·s across a wide temperature range from room temperature up to 220°C in thin-film transistors.

Building two-dimensional materials one row at a time: Avoiding the nucleation barrier

Jue, 12/06/2018 - 12:38

Assembly of two-dimensional (2D) molecular arrays on surfaces produces a wide range of architectural motifs exhibiting unique properties, but little attention has been given to the mechanism by which they nucleate. Using peptides selected for their binding affinity to molybdenum disulfide, we investigated nucleation of 2D arrays by molecularly resolved in situ atomic force microscopy and compared our results to molecular dynamics simulations. The arrays assembled one row at a time, and the nuclei were ordered from the earliest stages and formed without a free energy barrier or a critical size. The results verify long-standing but unproven predictions of classical nucleation theory in one dimension while revealing key interactions underlying 2D assembly.

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