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Test could detect patients at risk from lethal fungal spores

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a genetic mutation in humans linked to a 17-fold increase in the amount of dangerous fungal spores in the lungs.The study, published in Nature Communications could allow doctors to screen patients at risk from Aspergillus, and could easily be developed into a test.

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Following a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce stroke risk in women over 40 but not in men -- according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.A new report, published today in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke, reveals that a diet high in fish, fruit, vegetables, nuts and beans, and lower in meat and dairy, reduces stroke risk among white adults who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
Following a Mediterranean-style diet (high in fish, fruits and nuts, vegetables and beans and lower in meat and dairy) reduced stroke risk in women over 40, but not in men. The Mediterranean-style diet reduced stroke risk among white adults who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

Can a common heart condition cause sudden death?

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
About one person out of 500 has a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This condition causes thickening of the heart muscle and results in defects in the heart's electrical system. Under conditions of environmental stress such as exercise, HCM can result in sudden death. In other cases, patients may go undiagnosed, with their heart function declining gradually over decades.

Crunched for time? High-intensity exercise = same cell benefits in fewer minutes

Mié, 09/19/2018 - 22:00
A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's, and provide a solution

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at King's College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's.

Public Health England has failed to learn lessons over partnership with drinks industry

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Public Health England (PHE) has failed to learn the lessons over its partnership with the drinks industry, warn public health experts in The BMJ today.

Time to ban the sale of energy drinks to children, says senior doctor

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
It's time to bring in laws to ban the sale of caffeinated energy drinks to children and young people in England to tackle the twin epidemics of obesity and mental health problems, argues Professor Russell Viner, President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health in The BMJ today.

High gluten diet in pregnancy linked to increased risk of diabetes in children

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
A high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of their child developing type 1 diabetes, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.

Is the end of the recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) a good thing?

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Recently, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called for the eliminating involvement of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) in human gene therapy experiments, marking the end of an era of federal government oversight.

Simulations of every woman's breast tissue address delay on enhanced MRI cancer detection

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Purdue University researchers have simulated how over 20 different breast tissue ratios respond to heat given off by MRIs at higher field strengths than available in hospitals today.

Super cheap earth element to advance new battery tech to the industry

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Worldwide efforts to make sodium-ion batteries just as functional as lithium-ion batteries have long since controlled sodium's tendency to explode, but not yet resolved how to prevent sodium-ions from 'getting lost' during the first few times a battery charges and discharges. Now, Purdue University researchers made a sodium powder version that fixes this problem and holds a charge properly.

Flu season forecasts could be more accurate with access to health care companies' data

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
New research shows that data routinely collected by health care companies -- if made available to researchers and public health agencies -- could enable more accurate forecasts of when the next flu season will peak, how long it will last and how many people will get sick.

Discomfort or death? New study maps hot spots of child mortality from diarrhea in Africa

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
New high-resolution maps pinpoint areas across Africa with concentrations of child deaths from diarrhea and show uneven progress over 15 years to mitigate the problem.The study, covering 2000 to 2015, maps the entire African continent in 5x5 square kilometer units and was published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. National and provincial maps of diarrhea in Africa often mask inequalities at the local community level, according to IHME researchers.

Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Regular, low-intensity exercise reduces severity of stroke

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
In an editorial in this week's Neurology, Nicole Spartano, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), agrees that a recent study (Reinholdsson et. al.), which proposes that individuals who reported being physically active (defined as either two hours of moderate intensity or four hours of light activity per week) before their stroke had milder symptoms.

People who walk just 35 minutes a day may have less severe strokes

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
People who participate in light to moderate physical activity, such as walking at least four hours a week or swimming two to three hours a week, may have less severe strokes than people who are physically inactive, according to a study published in the Sept. 19, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

MS researchers find well-being differs with age in multiple sclerosis

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
The oldest group reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms and the highest levels of Physical QOL. 'These results were unexpected,' said Dr. Strober, 'given the functional limitations, disease progression, and neurological lesions seen in the aging MS population. Contrary to our hypothesis, the trend by age paralleled the general population. Younger individuals with MS are at greater risk for depression and poor QOL. If confirmed, targeted screening for depression by age may be warranted in this population.'

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike Willis, an assistant professor of Geology at CU Boulder. That dwarfs the ice's previous average speed of about 2 inches per day and has challenged scientists' assumptions about the stability of the cold ice caps dotting Earth's high latitudes.

New research identifies abundant endangered fish below waterfall in San Juan River

Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
A new study published in the journal River Research and Applications provides insight into the magnitude of the effect this waterfall has on endangered fishes in the San Juan River. From 2015-2017 more than 1,000 razorback sucker and dozens of Colorado pikeminnow were detected downstream of the waterfall. Some fish moved to this location from up to 600 miles away in the Colorado River.

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