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SF State researcher explores how information enters our brains

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study by SF State Associate Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella suggests that we have less control over our conscious thoughts than previously assumed.

Electronic stickers to streamline large-scale 'internet of things'

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at Purdue University and the University of Virginia have developed a new fabrication method that makes tiny, thin-film electronic circuits peelable from a surface. The technique not only eliminates several manufacturing steps and the associated costs, but also allows any object to sense its environment or be controlled through the application of a high-tech sticker.

Homology Medicines announces publication of in vivo gene editing data with nuclease-free technology

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Homology Medicines, Inc., a genetic medicines company, announced today a peer-reviewed publication demonstrating that Homology's technology induces efficient and precise in vivo gene editing. The publication, by senior author Saswati Chatterjee, Ph.D., Department of Surgery, member of the Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope in California, and scientific co-founder of Homology, also highlights the platform's use of homologous recombination, the cells' natural DNA correction pathway, for nuclease-free gene editing.

OSU researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems.

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties. Labs at Rice and Northwestern universities made the first detailed analysis of borophene defects.

Researchers engineer bacteria to create fertilizer out of thin air

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A team at Washington University in St. Louis has created a bacteria that uses photosynthesis to create oxygen during the day, and at night, uses nitrogen to create chlorophyll for photosynthesis. This development could lead to plants that do the same, eliminating the use of some -- or possibly all -- man-made fertilizer, which has a high environmental cost.

An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new UC San Diego research

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation -- until now.

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers have developed a microscopic "trampoline" that can absorb microwave energy and bounce it into laser light -- a crucial step for sending quantum signals over long distances.

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD), the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have figured out how to increase a rechargeable battery's capacity by using aggressive electrodes and then stabilizing these potentially dangerous electrode materials with a highly-fluorinated electrolyte.

New development in 3D super-resolution imaging gives insight on Alzheimer's disease

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
One major problem with understanding Alzheimer's is not being able to clearly see why the disease starts. A super-resolution 'nanoscope' developed by Purdue University researchers now provides a 3D view of brain molecules with 10 times greater detail. This imaging technique could help reveal how the disease progresses and where new treatments could intervene.

New ALS therapy in clinical trials

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates an investigational therapy for an inherited form of ALS extends survival and reverses signs of neuromuscular damage in mice and rats. The findings, published July 16 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, have led to a phase one/two clinical trial to investigate whether the drug could benefit people with ALS whose disease is caused by mutations in a gene called SOD1.

Forget joysticks, use your torso to pilot drones

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Your torso is more intuitive -- and more precise -- than joysticks for piloting drones, both simulated and real, according to a recent study by EPFL scientists. Work is already underway to implement this new body-machine-interface technology for search and rescue with drones.

New platform discovered at City of Hope poised to be next generation of genetic medicines

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A City of Hope scientist discovered a gene-editing technology that could efficiently and accurately correct the genetic defects that underlie certain diseases, positioning the new tool as the basis for the next generation of genetic therapies. This editing platform may be used to cure inherited and acquired diseases. The proof-of-concept study spotlights a promising new gene-editing platform that may eventually be used to treat diseases such as sickle cell disease, hemophilia and other genetic disorders.

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon.

The origins of pottery linked with intensified fishing in the post-glacial period

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A study into some of the earliest known pottery remains has suggested that the rise of ceramic production was closely linked with intensified fishing at the end of the last Ice Age.

Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
At an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan, researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

Temple study calls into question IVC filter effectiveness in DVT patients undergoing CDT

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
The true benefit of inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) placement at the time of catheter-directed thrombolysis for patients with deep vein thrombosis is unclear. A research team led by Dr. Riyaz Bashir, Director of Vascular and Endovascular Medicine at Temple University Hospital, examined nationwide utilization rates of IVCFs in patients undergoing CDT to assess contemporary trends and comparative outcomes to patients who do not undergo IVCF placement. The findings were published by JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

NASA catches tropical cyclone 11W passing northern Philippines

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of recently formed Tropical Depression 11W.

A scientist's final paper looks toward earth's future climate

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A NASA scientist's final scientific paper, published posthumously this month, reveals new insights into one of the most complex challenges of Earth's climate: understanding and predicting future atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases and the role of the ocean and land in determining those levels.

Study: Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

Dom, 07/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study demonstrates that a correlation also exists between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time -- and the news isn't good.

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