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Study: With Twitter, race of the messenger matters

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
University of Kansas journalism researchers showed real tweets about the NFL anthem protests to a group of millennials. Eye tracking software found they viewed tweets from white males the longest, but self-reported data showed they gave the most credibility to African-American males.

Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to 'maybe.'

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Princeton geoscientists Blair Schoene and Gerta Keller led an international team of researchers who have assembled the first high-resolution timeline for the massive eruptions in India's Deccan Traps, determining that the largest eruption pulse occurred less than 100,000 years before the mass extinction that killed the (non-avian) dinosaurs.

Disability progression in multiple sclerosis linked to income, education

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Neighborhood income and education level is associated with risk of disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

Illinois researchers are first to count growth factors in single cells

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, University of Illinois professor Andrew Smith reported the invention of a new technology platform that digitally counts, for the first time ever, the amount of growth factor entering an individual cell. Prior to this, researchers inferred growth factor binding based on how the receiving cells responded when the growth factor molecules were introduced.

Antarctic flies protect fragile eggs with 'antifreeze'

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
A molecular analysis by the University of Cincinnati found that wingless flies protected their eggs with a temperature-resistant gel to help them withstand freezing and thawing in Antarctica.

New dynamic dependency framework may lead to better neural social and tech systems models

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
In a paper published recently in Nature Physics, researchers present a dynamic dependency framework that can capture interdependent and competitive interactions between dynamic systems which are used to study synchronization and spreading processes in multilayer networks with interacting layers. "This dynamic dependency framework provides a powerful tool to better understand many of the interacting complex systems which surround us," they wrote.

New 2019 guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Lin Yee Chen, MD, MS, Associate Professor with Tenure, Cardiovascular Division, in the Department of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School was part of a Writing Committee tasked with updating the 2014 guidelines for patients with AFib. The 2019 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation were just published as the standard for the management of Afib in the U.S.

Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is a good idea to start with -- and it may have an extra economic benefit. A Michigan Tech engineering is presenting their results this week on turning carbon dioxide into oxalic acid, which is used to process rare earth elements for electronic devices.

CCNY's Nir Krakauer in monsoon research breakthrough

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
With average precipitation of 35 inches per four-month season over an area encompassing most of the Indian subcontinent, the South Asia summer monsoon is intense, only partly understood, and notoriously difficult to predict. Until now, according to findings by Nir Y. Krakauer, a City College of New York civil engineer.

Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Finns

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Overall, 40 percent of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20 percent were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose role in the disease remains unknown.

A quantum magnet with a topological twist

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Researchers probed a special kind of magnet containing atoms arranged in a pattern called a kagome lattice, which takes its name from a Japanese basket. They found that electrons in this material exhibit exotic behaviors that could be exploited for futuristic applications -- and that under a high magnetic field some electrons in this material act like an upside-down magnet.

Are the French lousy at languages? Not if there's noise!

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
It is often said that the French have poor English skills. But according to a study conducted by a CNRS researcher and her colleagues in the Netherlands, Finland and the UK, when it comes to process English spoken in a noisy environment like a café or a restaurant, the French have nothing to be ashamed of!

Medicaid expansion led to increase in screening for colorectal cancer patients in Kentucky

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
The number of low-income patients screened for colorectal cancer more than tripled after Medicaid expansion in 2014, according to study findings in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

NASA-NOAA satellite provides wide view of Tropical Cyclone Oma

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
When you look at a Tropical Cyclone Oma from space, you'll get a sense of its massive size. While orbiting the Earth, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a look at the large tropical storm in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

New research identifies causes for defects in 3D printing and paves way for better results

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
New research, led by teams from Carnegie Mellon University and the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, has identified how and when tiny gas pockets in manufactured products, which lead to cracks and other failures, form. The team has also developed a methodology to predict their formation -- information that could dramatically improve the 3D printing process.

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes Typhoon Wutip

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
Typhoon Wutip was impacting the Federated States of Micronesia in the Southern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and analyzed the storm in infrared light.

US patient advocacy groups received majority of pharma donations in multi-country study

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that U.S.-based patient advocacy organizations received a disproportionate amount of contributions made by the world's 10 largest pharmaceutical companies in 2016.

Physician well-being improving, but burnout risk remains

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
The good news is that physician burnout appears to be improving, along with indicators for physician well-being. However, physicians remain at high risk for burnout, depression and depersonalization, compared to other professionals.

Good dog? Bad dog? Their personalities can change

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
When dog-parents spend extra time scratching their dogs' bellies, take their dogs out for long walks and games of fetch, or even when they feel constant frustration over their dogs' naughty chewing habits, they are gradually shaping their dogs' personalities.

Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe

Jue, 02/21/2019 - 23:00
On National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, Vanderbilt study disputes that Celebrex has no more impact on valves than older drugs in its class.

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