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From the classroom to the NICU: Real-world neuroscience opening new avenues

Sáb, 03/25/2017 - 22:00
When going to the movies with friends, one small action can make a big difference to be on the same page after the movie: eye contact. A simple conversation before the movie sets you up to be more in sync with your friends after the movie. These findings, being presented at the CNS conference in San Francisco, come from an unlikely place -- not the lab, or even a movie theater, but a classroom.

Identifying genes key to human memory: Insights from genetics and cognitive neuroscience

Sáb, 03/25/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have identified more than 100 genes important for memory in people. The study, being presented at the CNS annual conference in San Francisco, is the first to identify correlations between gene data and brain activity during memory processing, providing a new window into human memory. It is part of the nascent but growing field of 'imaging genetics,' which aims to relate genetic variation to variation in brain anatomy and function.

Study shows potential of stem cell therapy to repair lung damage

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
A new study has found that stem cell therapy can reduce lung inflammation in an animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis.

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensors

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Georgia Tech found that a class of water soluble liquid crystals, called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, exhibited unexpected characteristics that could be harnessed for use in sensors and other potential applications.

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to neurons.

An intriguing new gene candidate in the search for Alzheimer disease therapies

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Tau pathology is one of the defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD), which is the most common form of dementia in older age. While symptomatic treatments exist, there are currently no preventive therapies for AD. Investigators at BWH and Rush University Medical Center reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with Tau accumulation. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the paper describes the identification and validation of a genetic variant within the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta (PTPRD) gene.

A little vigorous exercise may help boost kids' cardiometabolic health

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
As little as 10 minutes a day of high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce their risk of developing heart problems and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to an international study led by a researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
In a new paper published in National Science Review, a team of scientists from China described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date.

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warming

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects of global warming.

New gene discovered associated with Tau, a common form of brain pathology

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Investigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that accumulates in several different conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, certain forms of dementia and Parkinsonian syndromes as well as chronic traumatic encephalopathy that occurs with repeated head injuries.

'Bench to bedside to bench'

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
It's time to update the old 'bench-to-bedside' shorthand, researchers at The Jackson Laboratory, NHGRI and institutions across the US declare.

The Role of Context in Ethnic/Racial Identity Among Minority Youth

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
This special section of Child Development, edited by Drs. Eleanor Seaton, Stephen Quintana, Maykel Verkuyten and Gilbert Gee, adds important information to the research in this area. It includes articles from national and international scholars on how policies, relationships, and locations can influence the development and content of ethnic/racial identity among youth.

Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Star-shaped cells called astrocytes, long considered boring, 'support cells,' are finally coming into their own. To everyone's surprise they even play an important role in the body's master clock, which schedules everything from the release of hormones to the onset of sleepiness.

NASA sees System 91P coming together east of Queensland

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
The area of tropical low pressure designated System 91P appears to be organizing in NASA satellite imagery on March 24. Visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed that the tropical low is consolidating and strengthening in the Coral Sea, South Pacific Ocean.

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Caleb's heaviest rainfall

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Tropical cyclone Caleb formed on March 23 in the South Indian Ocean southwest of the Indonesian Island of Sumatra. The GPM core observatory satellite had a fairly good view of the newly formed tropical cyclone when it flew overhead and analyzed its rainfall and found the heaviest precipitation was affected by westerly winds.

BRCA testing on the rise for those without breast or ovarian cancers

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
More women are requesting BRCA gene testing associated with certain types of cancer thanks to increased interest in the procedure. Traditionally women tested for mutations in the cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been those diagnosed with early onset breast or ovarian cancer in order to guide treatment options.

Extreme space weather: Protecting our critical infrastructure

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Extreme space weather has a global footprint and the potential to damage critical infrastructure on the ground and in space. A new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre calls for bridging knowledge gaps and for better coordination at EU level to reduce the potential impact of space weather events.

The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP): A new model that addresses limitations of traditional taxonomies

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
An inaugural publication from an international consortium of psychologists and psychiatrists offers a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) -- introduced by Dr. Roman Kotov and colleagues (Online First) in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology -- is a new, dimensional classification system of a wide range of psychiatric problems that was developed to reflect the state-of-the art scientific evidence.

In a quantum race everyone is both a winner and a loser

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of Science Advances.

Land-based microbes may be invading and harming coral reefs

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
A new study suggests that coral reefs -- already under existential threat from global warming -- may be undergoing further damage from invading bacteria and fungi coming from land-based sources, such as outfall from sewage treatment plants and coastal inlets. The study raised the possibility that microbes from these sources are invading reefs off of the southeastern coast of Florida. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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