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Making the case for a comprehensive national registry for pediatric CKD

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
In a commentary published by the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Sun-Young Ahn, M.D., and Marva Moxey-Mims, M.D., explain that pediatric chronic kidney disease can contribute to growth failure, developmental and neurocognitive defects, and impaired cardiovascular health.

New drug could sustain oxygen-starved hearts

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
In new studies conducted at UC San Francisco, a novel oxygen-delivery therapeutic restored the function of oxygen-starved heart tissue in an animal model of global hypoxia. Unlike its experimental predecessors, the new drug does not appear to cause systemic side effects or overcorrect with excessive blood oxygenation, which can itself be toxic. Instead, the new drug delivers its precious oxygen cargo only to the tissues that need it most.

PTSD symptoms improve when patient chooses form of treatment, study shows

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
A study led by the University of Washington is the first large-scale trial of hundreds of PTSD patients, including veterans and survivors of sexual assault, to measure whether patient preference in the course of treatment impacts the effectiveness of a type of cognitive behavioral therapy and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a type of antidepressant often prescribed for PTSD.

Sleep apnea more deadly when patients experience short interrupted breaths

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Patients with sleep apnea who have short interruptions in breathing while they sleep are at higher risk for death than those with longer interruptions, according to a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The finding could help doctors better prevent long-term mortality associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

Good spatial memory? You're likely to be good at identifying smells too

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
People who have better spatial memory are also better at identifying odors, according to a study published this week in Nature Communications. The study builds on a recent theory that the main reason that a sense of smell evolved was to aid in navigation, since most animals rely primarily on smell to find food and avoid predators.

Father's nicotine exposure may cause problems in future generations of his children

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
A new Florida State University College of Medicine study in mice produced results that suggest nicotine exposure in men could lead to cognitive deficits in their children and grandchildren. Further studies will be required to know if the same outcomes seen in mice would apply to humans.

How do pelvic floor muscle exercises reduce overactive bladder symptoms?

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common form of urinary incontinence that is widely treated with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A new laboratory study lends insights into how PFM training works: by reducing contractions of the detrusor muscle of the bladder, reports the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the?Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Recent survey provides updated national estimate of doctors' financial ties to industry

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Since 2013, gifts and payments to doctors by pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been publicly reported. Some medical centers, employers, and states have banned or restricted detailing visits, physician payments or gifts. In order to better understand the effects of these changes, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, and the American Board of Internal Medicine conducted a national survey of internal medicine doctors.

Cleveland Clinic shows better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open.

Surprise finding: Discovering a previously unknown role for a source of magnetic fields

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Feature describes unexpected discovery of a role the process that seeds magnetic fields plays in mediating a phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe and can disrupt cell phone service and knock out power grids on Earth.

Invasive forage grass leads to grassland bird decline

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
In a recent study published in Landscape Ecology, University of Illinois researchers and others found that a common cattle forage grass, tall fescue, is associated with nest failure in dickcissels, small grassland birds similar to sparrows.

Healthy diets linked to better outcomes in colorectal cancer

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Colorectal cancer patients who followed healthy diets had a lower risk of death from colorectal cancer and all causes, even those who improved their diets after being diagnosed.

Regular exercise should be part of cancer care for all patients

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Including exercise or sport as part of cancer care can significantly improve symptom management, quality of life and fitness during and after treatment, French researchers have concluded in two presentations to be reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich. Even among patients at highest risk of poor quality of life, exercise can make a difference.

New research shows benefits of exercise for first time in advanced lung cancer

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Most people with lung cancer are unaware of the benefits of regular exercise, yet new data show it can significantly reduce fatigue and improve well being. Results of two studies to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich underline the value of exercise, including in patients with advanced or metastatic lung cancer.

Social vulnerability and medical skepticism top factors limiting adherence to screening

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Social vulnerability showed to be a major limitation to participation in cancer screening for four tumors types - breast, cervical, colorectal and lung -- according to the French nationwide observational survey, EDIFICE 6. Also, a disbelief in cancer test efficacy among target populations was highlighted as new indicator of the non-uptake of screening, according to results to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress.

Adding refined fiber to processed food could have negative health effects, study finds

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Adding highly refined fiber to processed foods could have negative effects on human health, such as promoting liver cancer, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Toledo.

Advantages of DNA immunization platform for eliciting mAbs in multiple species

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers have taken advantage of the benefits of DNA immunization over traditional protein-based immunization to elicit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against challenging targets in three species -- mouse, rabbit, and human models.

Clapping Music app reveals that changing rhythm isn't so easy

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others.

European Commission launches online tool to measure how well Europe and Asia are connected

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
The ASEM Sustainable Connectivity Portal offers insights into the state of connectivity between 30 European countries, 19 Asian countries, Australia and New Zealand, together representing the ASEM countries.

US air pollution deaths nearly halved between 1990 and 2010

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Air pollution in the US has decreased since about 1990, and a new study conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill now shows that this air quality improvement has brought substantial public health benefits. The study, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, found that deaths related to air pollution were nearly halved between 1990 and 2010.

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