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Study confirms prescription weight-loss medication helps with opiate addiction recovery

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have confirmed that a prescription weight-loss pill decreases the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone. In a study published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, the researchers led by UTMB scientist Kathryn Cunningham found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies.

Neurosurgical practices must evolve and transform to adapt to rapidly changing healthcare industry

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Neurosurgeons hoping to successfully navigate the rapidly changing healthcare industry must advance their strategies and adapt new ways of thinking in order to continue to thrive in an evolving environment.

Most Lithuanians still emigrate for economic reasons

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Independent research, initiated and carried out by Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) interdisciplinary migration research cluster shows that introduction of Euro in Lithuania coincides with the fourth wave of emigration. In 2015, more than 40 thousand people left Lithuania, and in 2016 -- around 50 thousand.

The need to reinvent primary care

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Primary care is 'first-contact, continuous, comprehensive, and coordinated care provided to populations undifferentiated by gender, disease, or organ system.' High-quality primary care has been associated with improved population health, lower costs, and greater equity. Despite this evidence, primary care has been consistently under-resourced, accounting for just six to eight percent of US health care expenditures. A special issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, just published, takes a look at primary care today.

Microwave-induced bismuth salts-mediated synthesis of molecules of medicinal interests

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
The products obtained via bismuth salts-mediated reactions are medicinally active or starting materials for the synthesis of biologically active molecules including sex hormones, anticancer agents, antibacterial agents and agents for chagas diseases.

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Lancaster University in the UK have found a way to detect subtle early warning signs that reveal a frog population is at risk from pollution.

'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampage

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Oncogene pinpoints a protein that may be essential to Ewing's sarcoma metastasis -- when researchers knocked down the protein KDM3A in Ewing's sarcoma tumor cells, one of a family known as Jumonji proteins, they also inhibited the cancer's metastatic ability.

The world's largest diamond foil

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Material researchers of Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg have come a step closer to their goal of providing large diamond foils for practical applications. In a test reactor, they have succeeded in producing the world's largest diamond foil with a diameter of 28 cm. Diamond foils can be used as ultimate wear protection in industrial applications and for research into thermoelectric power generation -- an emerging market.

Survivors of childhood brain tumors have increased body fat

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
These findings suggest that one of the most important risk factors for heart disease and type 2 diabetes, which is excess total and central fat in the body, is present relatively early in survivors of childhood brain tumors. This may program their future risk of these diseases and impact their outcomes.

On the trail of Parkinson's disease

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
The molecular causes of diseases such as Parkinson's need to be understood as a first step towards combating them. University of Konstanz chemists working alongside Professor Malte Drescher recently succeeded in analysing what happens when selective mutations of the alpha-synuclein protein occur -- a protein that is closely linked to Parkinson's disease.

OSIRIS-REx asteroid search tests instruments, science team

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
OSIRIS-REx did not discover any Earth-Trojan asteroids during a two-week search, but the spacecraft's cameras operated flawlessly and demonstrated they can image objects two magnitudes dimmer than originally expected.

New study identifies successful method to reduce dental implant failure

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
A research team comprising scientists from the School of Biological Sciences, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and the School of Engineering at the University of Plymouth, have joined forces to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a new nanocoating for dental implants to reduce the risk of peri-implantitis.

Lighting up antibiotic resistance

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Carbapenems are among the 'antibiotics of last resort' and can fight infections for which other drugs have longlost their effectiveness. However, even carbapenem-resistant pathogenic strains have emerged over the last decades.

Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. By being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.

Evolutionary advantage of the common periwinkle

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
A special kind of small sulfur-rich proteins, the metallothioneins, have an extraordinarily large capability for bindingheavy metals. An international team of scientists has now discovered that the marine common periwinkle, which is widelyconsidered a delicacy, contains the largest version of the protein found yet, with one additional cadmium-binding domain anda one-third higher detoxification capacity. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this feature may help thesnail survive in heavy-metal-polluted environments.

Why do guillemot chicks leap from the nest before they can fly?

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
It looks like a spooky suicide when small, fluffy guillemot chicks leap from the cliffs and fall several hundred meters towards the sea -- long before they are fully fledged. But researchers have now discovered that there is good reason behind this seeming madness.

Scientists discover shared genetic origin for ALS/MND and schizophrenia

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
The study, conducted by scientists at Trinity College Dublin, indicates that the causes of ALS/MND and schizophrenia are biologically linked. The scientists say that the new findings have major implications for how we classify diseases and that they challenge the existing divide between neurology and psychiatry.

Severe psoriasis predominantly affects men

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men. The study, conducted by researchers at Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet, is published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology.

Big data approach to predict protein structure

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
Nothing works without proteins in the body, they are the molecular all-rounders in our cells. If they do not work properly, severe diseases, such as Alzheimer's, may result. To develop methods to repair malfunctioning proteins, their structure has to be known. Using a big data approach, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed a method to predict protein structures.

Spread of ages is key to impact of disease, animal study finds

Jue, 03/23/2017 - 22:00
How a disease outbreak affects a group of animals depends on the breakdown of ages in the population, research has shown.

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