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Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
A super compact interferometer developed by the lab of Chunlei Guo, professor of optics at the University of Rochester, will give scientists an unprecedented ability to fine tune even the quickest pulses of light for a host of applications, and could render traditional instruments for measuring light beams obsolete.

Fifteen minutes of exercise creates optimal brain state for mastering new motor skills

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
A recent study in NeuroImage demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention. More specifically, the research shows, for the first time, that as little as a single fifteen-minute bout of cardiovascular exercise increases brain connectivity and efficiency. It's a discovery that could, in principle, accelerate recovery of motor skills in patients who have suffered a stroke or who face mobility problems following an injury.

NASA sees Typhoon Maria make landfall in China

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Typhoon Maria in 3D as it made landfall in southeastern China.After striking the Ryukyu Islands of Japan and grazing Taiwan with torrential rains, Typhoon Maria made landfall just north of the populous city of Fuzhou, China with sustained winds of 95 knots and a broad shield of precipitation.

Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
A team of bioengineers at UC San Diego has answered a question that has long puzzled neuroscientists, and may hold a key to better understanding the complexities of neurological disorders: why are neuron axons designed the way they are? The answer -- that they're designed to balance the speed that information flows into the neuron relative to the time it takes the neuron to process that information -- seems intuitive, but has never been quantified until now.

Hurricane Chris's eye stares at NASA's Aqua satellite

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the US Eastern seaboard, it captured an infrared image of Hurricane Chris that showed an eye staring back at the satellite. Chris is expected to continue generating heavy ocean swells along the US East Coast and bring heavy rainfall to Newfoundland, Canada.

NASA's GPM finds Beryl's remnants raining on the Bahamas

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
The remnant thunderstorms from former Tropical Storm Beryl were bringing some areas of heavy rain to the Bahamas when the GPM satellite passed overhead.

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers.

Researchers clarify role of mutations in glioblastoma

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center investigated whether the location of the mutation within the sequence of the PIK3CA gene affected the mutation's ability to help drive growth of glioblastoma tumors. They also evaluated whether the location of the mutation would affect the cancer's response to certain treatments.

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus.

Legalizing same-sex marriage increased health care access for gay men: Vanderbilt study

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
One of the first studies to examine the health impacts of marriage for LGBT individuals shows that legalizing same-sex marriage improved health care access for gay men.

Rhino sperm from the cold

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
A new mixture of cryoprotectives allows for an unprecedented high motility of frozen rhinoceros sperm after thawing, report scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, Germany. These new cryoprotectives can increase the prospects of utilizing assisted reproduction techniques for many endangered wildlife species. The study, based on three rhinoceros species, has now been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Intimate partner violence doesn't end with the relationship

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Violence that occurs between intimate partners does not end with the relationship's conclusion, yet few resources exist to help survivors move beyond the betrayal of abusive relationships in order to begin new, healthy relationships.The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) are profound, painfully enduring and should command as much attention as providing victims with the help necessary to leave violent relationships, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo social work researcher.

Healthier hearts equal healthier guts

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Heart health and gut health may be linked. A new study by San Francisco State University researchers finds that people with better cardiovascular fitness have more of a certain type of bacteria in their gut.

Hepatitis C vaccine could dramatically reduce transmission in people who inject drugs

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Among the most serious consequences of the opioid epidemic is the spread of hepatitis C among injecting drug users. A study published in Science Translational Medicine shows that if a hepatitis C vaccine were successfully developed, it would dramatically reduce transmission of hepatitis C among drug users -- even though it's unlikely such a vaccine would provide complete immunity.

DNA marks in adults tracked back to changes in earliest days of life

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have gained a glimpse of how marks on our genes that could be linked to adverse health outcomes in later life behave differently in the first few days after conception, according to new research published in Science Advances.

Distinctive projectile point technology sheds light on peopling of the Americas

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
In the lowest layer of the Area 15 archaeological grounds at the Gault Site in Central Texas, researchers have unearthed a projectile point technology never previously seen in North America, which they date to be at least 16,000 years old, or a time before Clovis.

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain's cerebellum

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC).

Combination treatment fortifies the aging immune system

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have found that a combination treatment safely enhances the ability of the immune system to fight infections in the elderly.

Soccer headers may be linked to balance problems

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
Soccer players who head the ball more often may be more likely to have balance problems than players who do not head the ball as often, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Indianapolis July 20-22, 2018.

Salamanders show more resistance to global warming than previously believed

Mar, 07/10/2018 - 22:00
The southern Appalachian Mountains are home to 10 percent of global salamander diversity. But current predictions indicate that 70 to 85 percent of this habitat will become unsuitable for salamanders by 2080 due to rising temperatures caused by climate change. Clemson University scientists shows that this extinction risk might be overestimated, because previous research largely ignored the salamanders' abilities to acclimate. Riddell and Sears project that plasticity reduces extinction risk by up to 72 percent.

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