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Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Rice University researchers combine epoxy with a tough graphene foam and carbon nanotube scaffold to build a resilient composite that's tougher and as conductive as other compounds but as light as pure epoxy.

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up -- toward extinction

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
In the most comprehensive study of its kind, an international team of scientists led by University of Miami biologists has found that tropical and subtropical forests across South America's Andes Mountains are responding to warming temperatures by migrating to higher, cooler elevations, but probably not quickly enough to avoid the loss of their biodiversity, functional collapse, or even extinction.

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega.

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as 'austerity.' The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong "antiausterity" potential, making pancreatic cancer cells susceptible to nutrient starvation. They report their results in ACS' Journal of Natural Products.

Who joined the Islamic State from France between 2014 and 2016?

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Radicalized French citizens who adhere to Islamic State propaganda are less likely to disengage from their beliefs if they are married men with children, and from families with married parents. This is according to Nicolas Campelo of the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in France, who led a study in the journal Palgrave Communications which is published by Springer Nature.

New way to study swallowing could one day lead to improved treatments for ALS

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, but new findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine are deepening researchers' understanding of a common ALS symptom: swallowing problems.

Investigational drug shows promising results in Phase II study of aggressive, often fatal blood disorder with no approved therapies

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
A Phase I/II study, led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, reports an investigational drug called tagraxofusp has demonstrated high response rates in patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), a rare but highly aggressive -- and often fatal bone marrow and blood disorder -- for which there are no existing approved therapies.

Older adults' abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Bias-based bullying does more harm, is harder to protect against

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What's more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these harms are less effective against bias-based bullying.

Tropical Cyclone Gaja approaching Southeastern India

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Tropical Cyclone Gaja continued to track toward a landfall in southeastern India when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite flew over the Bay of Bengal and provided a visible image of the storm.

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99.9 percent.

Climate control of Earth's critical zone

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
New research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows how rainfall shapes the part of our planet that is just beyond where we can see.

Using social media to weaken the wrath of terror attacks

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Governments and police forces around the world need to beware of the harm caused by mass and social media following terror events. In a new report, leading counter-terrorism experts from around the world offer guidance to authorities to better manage the impacts of terror attacks by harnessing media communication.

Checking very preterm babies' head size can help identify long-term IQ problems

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Regular early head circumference assessments add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk - according to new research by an international research collaboration, including the University of Warwick, UK and the University of Tennessee Knoxville, US.

Ringling train chugs into digital world

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
The train car dedicated to transporting John Ringling across the country, often alongside his infamous circus, is now more accessible to the public due to the 3D printing of several spare train parts.

Advanced computer technology & software turn species identification interactive

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Representing a group of successful biocontrol agents for various pest fruit flies, a parasitic wasp genus remains overlooked, with its most recent identification key dating back to 1969, even though many new species have been added since then. Through a recent study, published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, which also describes one new to science species, Swiss scientists demonstrate the advantages of new-age interactive identification keys, produced with specialised, free-to-use software.

Earth's magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
In 2011, researchers proposed that artificial guide stars could be used to measure the Earth's magnetic field in the mesosphere. An international group of scientists has recently managed to do this with a high degree of precision. The technique may also help to identify magnetic structures in the solid Earth's lithosphere, to monitor space weather, and to measure electrical currents in the part of the atmosphere called ionosphere.

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting material for the reaction -- hydrogen -- to reach the enzyme-loaded electrode. Researchers solved this problem by combining previously developed concepts for packaging the enzymes with gas diffusion electrode technology.

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes

Mar, 11/13/2018 - 23:00
Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon over a 40-year period, and looked at the population genetic profile of a gene that determines salmon's age of maturity and size. The results show that the 'big salmon gene version' has become rarer in the population over time, and has been replaced by the 'small salmon gene version'.

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