Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 7 horas 51 mins

Fibers from old tires can improve fire resistance of concrete

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
A new way of protecting concrete from fire damage using materials recycled from old tires has been successfully tested by researchers at the University of Sheffield.

The Lancet Oncology: Rapid scale-up of HPV vaccine and screening could prevent up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Cervical cancer could be eliminated as a public health problem in most countries by the end of the century by rapid expansion of existing interventions, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

New insights into phenotypic complexity and diversity among cichlids

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Researchers from the University of Konstanz, the University of California-Los Angeles, Tel Aviv University and the Inter-University Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat gain new in-sights into how phenotypic complexity influences diversification among Lake Malawi cichlid fish.

Want to learn about dinosaurs? Pick up some Louisiana roadkill

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Scientists are able to learn about an animal's ecosystem by studying the chemical makeup of its body, whether the animal died recently or millions of years ago. To see if this method could be applied to learning about dinosaurs, researchers tested it on roadkill from an ecosystem to the swamps the dinosaurs lived in: Louisiana.

Darwin's finches don't tell the whole story of avian evolution

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
The connection between bird diet and skull shape is surprisingly weak for most species according to a new study led by UCL and the Natural History Museum, rewriting our understanding of how ecosystems influence evolution. Charles Darwin's 19th century observations of finches on the Galápagos Islands concluded that bird speciation was primarily influenced by ecosystem; the way a bird forages and eats forms its skull shape and drives evolutionary change.

Young children may see nationality as biological, new study suggests

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Young children see national identity, in part, as biological in nature, a perception that diminishes as they get older. But despite changes in views of nationality as we age, the work suggests the intriguing possibility that the roots of nationalist sentiments are established early in life.

Investigators figure out how to block new antibiotic resistance gene

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
A new antimicrobial-resistance gene, VCC-1, a ß-lactamase gene, has been discovered in benign close relatives of virulent Vibrio cholerae, which causes cholera. Now, a team of Canadian researchers has found a way to block the VCC-1 enzyme, which disables that resistance gene.

Cervical microbiome may promote high-grade precancerous lesions

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Infections with a Human Papillomavirus (HPV) cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases, and the disease's first sign is often the appearance of precancerous lesions on a woman's cervix. But bacteria may play an important role, too. New research suggests that the cervical microbiome may influence HPV infection more than researchers previously thought.

T-cell receptor diversity may be key to treatment of follicular lymphoma, Mayo study finds

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Healthy white blood cells, called "T-cells," play a crucial role in how the body fights follicular lymphoma. That's according to the results of a study led by Mayo Clinic hematologists Zhi Zhang Yang, M.D., and Stephen Ansell, M.D., Ph.D., that was published in Cell Reports. T-cells are a key part of the immune system and protect the body by fighting infections and cancer.

American women have better control of high blood pressure but are more obese than men

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford examined rates and management of diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, body mass index (BMI) and smoking and found that while there had been some improvements, women were now more likely to be obese and men less likely to have their blood pressure and diabetes under control.

Fluorescing urine signals organ transplant rejection, could replace needle biopsies

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Glowing pee may replace the biopsy needle: In detecting organ transplant rejection, a new nanoparticle has proven much faster and more thorough in the lab than a biopsy. When T cells mount their first attack on the organ's cells the nanoparticle sends an alarm signal into the urine that makes it fluoresce.

Research shows human trafficking screening tool effective in identifying victims

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
A screening tool designed specifically to assess for human trafficking was more likely to identify sexual and labor exploitation of youth, as well as the risk factors, than a commonly used psychosocial assessment, reported researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Baylor College of Medicine.

Keep calm and don't carry on when parenting teens

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
In a new study, University of Rochester psychologists find that mothers and fathers who are less capable of dampening down their anger are more likely to resort to harsh discipline aimed at their teens, and that fathers in particular were not as good at considering alternative explanations for their teens' behavior.

Prenatal forest fire exposure stunts children's growth

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Forest fires are more harmful than previously imagined, causing stunted growth in children who were exposed to smoke while in the womb, according to new research from Duke University and the National University of Singapore.

Jobs vs. death toll: Calculating corporate death penalties

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
What misdeeds warrant corporate death penalties? A new study explores two case studies focused on industries that kill more people than they employ. The study lays out the rationale for establishing an actionable threshold and offers insights into solutions. Using case studies in coal and tobacco, it calculates the number of deaths attributed to the coal and tobacco industries and finds surprising results.

Paper: Carbon taxes could create new winners and losers among countries

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
A global carbon tax would create new sets of economic winners and losers, with some countries holding a distinct competitive advantage over others, says new research from Don Fullerton, a Gutgsell Professor of Finance at Illinois and a scholar at the Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

Solar tadpole-like jets seen with NASA'S IRIS add new clue to age-old mystery

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have discovered tadpole-shaped jets coming out of the Sun that may help explain why the corona (the wispy upper atmosphere of our star) is so inexplicably hot.

More cancer survivors, fewer cancer specialists point to challenge in meeting care needs

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
An aging population, a growing number of cancer survivors, and a projected shortage of cancer care providers will result in a challenge in delivering the care for cancer survivors in the United States if systemic changes are not made. UNC Lineberger's Deborah K. Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, and American Cancer Society's Catherine M. Alfano, PhD, published a commentary in JNCI that outlines an approach to address the shortfall.

Terror attacks by Muslims get 357 percent more media coverage than other terror attacks, study shows

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
Terror attacks carried out by Muslims receive on average 357 percent more media coverage than those committed by other groups, according to research conducted at Georgia State University.

Report reveals more than a million Australian heart patients not given a second chance

Lun, 02/18/2019 - 23:00
A new report, developed by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, reveals that prevention of secondary heart attacks and strokes is critical to combating Australia's number one killer -- cardiovascular disease. It highlights the critical and timely opportunity to invest in secondary prevention in Australia.

Páginas