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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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What are insurance coverage policies for drug treatments for low back pain?

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
An analysis of prescription drug coverage policies for the treatment of low back pain suggests insurers could help to reduce opioid overuse by expanding access to opioid alternatives through coverage and reimbursement policies.

How are chronic opioid use, 2016 presidential voting patterns associated?

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
An analysis of Medicare claims data suggests chronic opioid use in US counties corresponded with support for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, with much of the correlation explained by socioeconomic factors.

Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' not so scary after all

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
After wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the mid-1990s, some scientists thought the large predator reestablished a 'landscape of fear' that caused elk, the wolf's main prey, to avoid risky places where wolves killed them. But according to findings from Michel Kohl and Dan MacNulty, Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' is not as scary as first thought.

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disorders

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
A broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism.

Research team discovers drug compound that stops cancer cells from spreading

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
New research, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that it may be possible to freeze cancer cells and kill them where they stand.

What causes the sound of a dripping tap -- and how do you stop it?

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens.

Normalisation of 'plus-size' risks hidden danger of obesity, study finds

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
New research warns that the normalisation of 'plus-size' body shapes may be leading to an increasing number of people underestimating their weight - undermining efforts to tackle England's ever-growing obesity problem.Analysis of data from almost 23,460 people who are overweight or obese revealed that weight misperception has increased in England. Men and individuals with lower levels of education and income are more likely to underestimate their weight status and consequently less likely to try to lose weight.

Inhaled nitric oxide may reduce kidney complications from heart surgery

Jue, 06/21/2018 - 22:00
Administration of nitric oxide gas during and for 24 hours following heart surgery decreased the risk of patients developing acute and chronic kidney problems, a randomized, controlled trial conducted in China found.

An emerging drug discovery approach to combat cancer

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
This review paper will cover recent advances in the development of chemotherapeutic agents against several metabolic targets for cancer therapy, including glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, glutaminase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase.

New evidence brief shows long-term effects of child-family separation

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Parent-child separation has long-term effects on child well-being, even if there is subsequent reunification. After being separated, reunited children can experience lasting difficulty with emotional attachment to their parents, self-esteem, and physical and psychological health, according to a new brief released by the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). The brief, written by scholars of SRCD's Latino Caucus, emphasizes that for some children, time does not appear to fully heal these psychological wounds.

Starving fungi could save millions of lives each year

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Researchers have identified a potentially new approach to treating lethal fungal infections that claim more than 1.6 million lives each year: starving the fungi of key nutrients, preventing their growth and spread.

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortality

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Eating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, but a new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and their colleagues using multiple measurements confirms it.

Study suggests bias for sons remains among second-generation women of South Asian descent

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A preference for male children persists among second-generation mothers of South Asian descent, according to new study that found a skewed ratio of male-to-female babies born to these women in Ontario.

Princeton chemists teach an enzyme a new trick, with potential for building new molecules

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Princeton chemists led by Prof. Todd Hyster have found a way to make a naturally occurring enzyme take on a new, artificial role, which has significant implications for modern chemistry, including pharmaceutical production.

Our intestinal microbiome influences metabolism -- through the immune system

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
The innate immune system, our first line of defense against bacterial infection, has a side job that's equally important: fine-tuning our metabolism.

Anxious individuals are less risky, moderated by higher control when making decisions

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
New research shows that highly anxious individuals exert more cognitive control when they make a risky decision compared with less anxious individuals. This in turn leads to less risky decisions.

Ketamine acts fast to treat depression and its effects last -- but how?

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Researchers led by Mark Rasenick in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, describe the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine's ability to squash depression and keep it at bay. They report their findings in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Deep data dive helps predict cerebral palsy

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A pioneering technique developed to analyze genetic activity of Antarctic worms is helping to predict cerebral palsy. The technique uses next-generation genetic sequencing data to measure how cells control the way genes are turned on or off, and can also be used in other human health care research.

Scientists solve the case of the missing subplate, with wide implications for brain science

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A new study shows that a group of neurons, previously thought to die in the course of development, in fact become incorporated into the brain's cortex. This research has implications for understanding -- and possibly treating --several brain disorders.

New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis -- deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and promote heart attacks and stroke. The findings could lead to improved therapies for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death worldwide.

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