Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 7 mins 38 segs

Pope's encyclical boosted his credibility on climate change, especially among liberals

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
The Pope's 2015 encyclical on climate change did not directly influence people's beliefs about the seriousness of climate change or its effect on the poor, a study in Cognition has found. The papal message did, however, indirectly influence people's beliefs about climate change by raising the Pope's credibility on that issue, most strongly among liberals.

Oyster farming to benefit from new genetic screening tool

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Oyster farmers are set to benefit from a new genetic tool that will help to prevent disease outbreaks and improve yields. The technology -- developed by scientists at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute -- will enable hatcheries to rapidly assess the genetic make-up of their oysters, so they can select animals with desirable characteristics from which to breed.

Paper: DNA may have only modest impact on sexual assault arrests

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Crime labs' DNA testing may influence arrests in just a small number of sexual assault cases, because most arrests occur before crime lab results are available, suggests a new study led by University of Illinois social work senior research specialist Theodore P. Cross.

Study: Street gangs, crime serve as deviant leisure activities for youths

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Street gang membership, criminal activities provide deviant leisure activities for at-risk youths, suggests a new study by University of Illinois researchers Liza Berdychevsky, Kim Shinew and Monika Stodolska.

Cowbird moms choosy when selecting foster parents for their young

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Despite their reputation as uncaring, absentee moms, cowbird mothers are capable of making sophisticated choices among potential nests in order to give their offspring a better chance of thriving, a new study shows.

Discovery of a key regulatory gene in cardiac valve formation

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have identified a key regulator gene for the formation of cardiac valves -- a process crucial to normal embryonic heart development. These results are published in the journal Cell Reports today.

Monash researchers find piece in inflammatory disease puzzle

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Inflammation is the process by which the body responds to injury or infection but when this process becomes out of control it can cause disease. Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute researchers, in collaboration with the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, have shed light on a key aspect of the process. Their findings may help guide the development of new treatments of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, which can lead to heart attack or stroke, and type 2 diabetes.

A new strategy reported to combat influenza and speed recovery

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have used a drug being developed to fight solid tumors to restore normal metabolism in flu-infected cells and reduce viral production without the threat of drug resistance.

Researchers reveal bioelectric patterns guiding worms' regenerative body plan after injury

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have succeeded in permanently rewriting flatworms' regenerative body shape by resetting their internal bioelectric pattern memory, causing even normal-appearing flatworms to harbor the 'code' to regenerate as two-headed worms.

Improve evolution education by teaching genetics first

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Evolution is a difficult concept for many students at all levels, however, a study publishing on May 23 in the open access journal PLOS Biology has demonstrated a simple cost-free way to significantly improve students' understanding of evolution at the secondary level: teach genetics before you teach them evolution.

Among all cancers, lung cancer appears to put patients at greatest suicide risk

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
A lung cancer diagnosis appears to put patients at the greatest risk of suicide when compared to the most common types of non-skin cancers, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.

First study shows tie between probiotic and improved symptoms of depression

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
This is the first study showing improved depression scores with a probiotic. It adds to the whole field of microbiota-gut-brain axis, providing evidence that bacteria affect behavior.

Immunotherapy target suppresses pain to mask cancer

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Duke University researchers found that a molecule called PD-L1, which is blocked by the immunotherapy drug nivolumab, acts not only on immune cells but also on the nerve cells that signal pain. That insight could lead to a simple test that measures subtle differences in pain sensitivity to gauge whether or not a cancer patient is responding to immunotherapy. This study also identifies PD-L1 as a previously unrecognized neuromodulator and pain inhibitor.

Declawing linked to aggression and other abnormal behaviors in cats

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
According to research published today in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery*, declawing increases the risk of long-term or persistent pain, manifesting as unwanted behaviors such as inappropriate elimination (soiling/urinating outside of the litter box) and aggression/biting.

Lawson and Western researchers suggest dual gait testing as early predictor of dementia

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are demonstrating that gait, or motion testing, while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task can be an effective predictor of progression to dementia and eventually help with earlier diagnosis.

UT study shows snakes, thought to be solitary eaters, coordinate hunts

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Snakes, although as social as birds and mammals, have long been thought to be solitary hunters and eaters. A new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, shows that some snakes coordinate their hunts to increase their chances of success.

Fall calving season may yield higher returns for southeastern beef producers

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Using simulation models based on 19 years of data, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture researchers determined that for Southeastern beef cattle producers the fall calving season, calving between mid-September and mid-November, was most profitable and had the smallest amount of variation in profits, meaning fall calving was less risky as compared to spring calving.

School choice policies may impact segregation and diversity of public schools

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
Despite decades of educational reform and legal efforts, many U.S. schools are experiencing increasing segregation, with 16 percent of public schools serving both minority and high poverty students.

Researchers untangle causes of differences in East Coast sea level rise

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
For years, scientists have been warning of a so-called 'hot spot' of accelerated sea-level rise along the northeastern US coast, but understanding the causes has proven challenging. Now an upcoming paper offers the first comprehensive model for sorting this out.

Study offers guidance for targeting residual ovarian tumors

Lun, 05/22/2017 - 22:00
MIT researchers who are working on an implantable device that could make intraperitoneal chemotherapy more bearable have published a new study that offers insight into how to improve chemotherapy strategies for ovarian cancer, and how to determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from their device.

Páginas