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Endocrine Society experts issue Clinical Practice Guideline on hypothalamic amenorrhea

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Female athletes and women who have eating disorders are prone to developing a condition called hypothalamic amenorrhea that causes them to stop menstruating. The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on ways to diagnose and treat this condition.

Scientists discover urinary biomarker that may help track ALS

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A study in Neurology suggests that analyzing levels of the protein p75ECD in urine samples from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may help monitor disease progression as well as determine the effectiveness of therapies. The study was supported by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

UC researchers help map future of precision medicine in Parkinson's disease

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Two landmark publications with co-authors from the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute outline a transformative approach to defining, studying and treating Parkinson's disease. Rather than approaching Parkinson's disease as a single entity, the international cadre of researchers advocates targeting therapies to distinct 'nodes or clusters' of patients based on specific symptoms or molecular features of their disease.

Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions.

Epigenetic alteration a promising new drug target for heroin use disorder

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Heroin use is associated with excessive histone acetylation, an epigenetic process that regulates gene expression, and more years of drug use correlate with higher levels of hyperacetylation, according to research conducted at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Weight-bearing exercises promote bone formation in men

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Now, Pamela Hinton, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, has published the first study in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. These changes promote bone formation, increasing bone density.

Under the dead sea, warnings of dire drought

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have developed a technique that uses light to get flat, plastic sheets to curve into spheres, tubes or bowls.

Charitable giving: How do power and beliefs about equality impact donations?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Are powerful, well-to-do people more charitable? It depends. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, wealthier people are more likely to donate to charity if they endorse social inequality while less wealthy people are more likely to make donations if they endorse greater equality.

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979.

Feeling out of control: Do consumers make practical purchases or luxury buys?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The common assumption about retail therapy is that it's all about indulging in things like pricey designer duds or the latest gadgets. But according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are actually more likely to make practical purchases than splurge on luxury items when they feel less in control.

Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from Tufts University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County used machine learning on the Stampede supercomputer to model the cellular control network that determines how tadpoles develop. Using that model, they reverse-engineered a drug intervention that created tadpoles with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. They plan to use the method for cancer therapies and regenerative medicine.

3-D printing turns nanomachines into life-size workers

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Dartmouth researchers unlock the key to transforming microscopic nanorings into smart materials that perform work at human-scale.

Paying for pain: What motivates tough mudders and other weekend warriors?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Why do people pay for experiences deliberately marketed as painful? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers will pay big money for extraordinary -- even painful -- experiences to offset the physical malaise resulting from today's sedentary lifestyles.

Costly curves? Overweight consumers spend more when reminded of thinness

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Popular media mirror Western culture's fixation with being thin. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, even subtle reminders of idealized bodies can encourage overweight consumers to overspend.

Lack of leisure: Is busyness the new status symbol?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Long gone are the days when a life of material excess and endless leisure time signified prestige. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, Americans increasingly perceive busy and overworked people as having high status.

High-risk medical devices: IQWiG sees no potential in 6 of 8 cases

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Only case series without informative value are available for most indications. A plausible mode of action is insufficient to attribute a potential.

MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroids has potential

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
IQWiG has attributed a potential for a benefit to a new treatment method according to §137e SGB V. A testing study has been initiated. Numerous other assessments had no consequences.

Ultrafast measurements explain quantum dot voltage drop

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time photoconversion processes.

Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and well-being.

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