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NUS study: Plants sacrifice 'daughters' to survive chilly weather

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
A new study by a team of plant biologists from the National University of Singapore found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.

New research reveals impact of seismic surveys on zooplankton

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
Marine seismic surveys used in petroleum exploration could cause a two to three-fold increase in mortality of adult and larval zooplankton, new research published in leading science journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has found. Scientists from IMAS and the Centre for Marine Science and Technology (CMST) at Curtin University studied the impact of commercial seismic surveys on zooplankton populations by carrying out tests using seismic air guns in the ocean off Southern Tasmania.

Protein mingling under blue light

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
IBS scientists developed a new faster and more efficient optogenetic tool to manipulate protein clusters under blue light.

Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 percent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may benefit from existing drugs, known as IGF1R inhibitors.

Don't leave baby boomers behind when designing wearable technology

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
Accounting for age-related cognitive and physical challenges can increase adoption rates for older users who need help managing their health.

Dietary and lifestyle recommendations for patients at risk of macular degeneration

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of severe visual impairment in older populations and is characterized by progressive destruction of the retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptors due to low-grade inflammation, ischemia and oxidative stress. Studies show evidence that carotenoids and antioxidants derived either from the diet or from supplements may significantly reduce the risk of visual loss in these patients.

Putting others first can cost lives in emergencies

Jue, 06/22/2017 - 22:00
Selfless heroism isn't the best strategy in life-and-death disaster situations involving groups of people, a new study from the University of Waterloo suggests.

Discovery of a new mechanism involved in the migration of cancer cells

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A team of young French researchers has discovered a new mechanism which facilitates cell migration. On the surface of its membrane, the cell develops multiple small hooks which help it to attach to fibers outside the cell and move along them. This action helps us to understand better how a cell escapes from the tumor mass and moves around the body to form a new focus.

Correct connections are crucial

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Working with colleagues from Harvard Medical School and Würzburg, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been examining the use of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkison's disease in an attempt to optimize treatment effectiveness. The results, describing an effective network profile of deep brain stimulation has been reported in the journal Annals of Neurology*.

Public health guidelines aim to lower health risks of cannabis use

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Canada's Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines, released today with the endorsement of key medical and public health organizations, provide 10 science-based recommendations to enable cannabis users to reduce their health risks. The guidelines, based on a scientific review by an international team of experts, are published in the American Journal of Public Health.

ACP expresses 'strongest opposition' to Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The American College of Physicians (ACP) expresses our strongest possible opposition to the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) of 2017, legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Turtle go-slow zone extensions needed

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
James Cook University marine scientists are calling for an extension of go-slow zones in turtle habitats to reduce boat strikes on the threatened creatures.

Researchers design sounds that can be recorded by microphones but inaudible to humans

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at the University of Illinois have designed a sound that is completely inaudible to humans (40 kHz or above) yet is audible to any microphone. The sound combines multiple tones that, when interacting with the microphone's mechanics, create what researchers call a 'shadow,' which is a sound that the microphones can detect.

Changes to diet, physical activity & behavior may reduce obesity in children, adolescents

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Latest health evidence shows that making changes to diet, physical activity and behavior may reduce obesity in children and adolescents.

Combined molecular biology test is the first to distinguish benign pancreatic lesions

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
When performed in tandem, two molecular biology laboratory tests distinguish, with near certainty, pancreatic lesions that mimic early signs of cancer but are completely benign. The lesions almost never progress to cancer, so patients may be spared unnecessary pancreatic cancer screenings or operations. The two-test combination is the only one to date that can accurately and specifically identify these benign pancreatic lesions.

Child safety or parental duty: New study maps out core concepts in the vaccination debate

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
'A single phrase can conjure up completely different images in our minds, depending on how that concept is organized in our mental models,' said Samarth Swarup, a research assistant professor at Virginia Tech.

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at risk

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A study of historic whaling records has revealed there were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up to 40 years before the event.The research by scientists from IMAS and Switzerland's University of Zurich has the potential for application to other species to pinpoint early warning signs that a population is at risk of collapse due to pressures such as overfishing or climate change.

Scientists recreate Californian Indian water bottles to study ancient exposure to chemicals

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Water bottles replicated in the traditional method used by Native Californian Indians reveal that the manufacturing process may have been detrimental to the health of these people. The study is published this week in the open access journal Environmental Health.

New report examines evidence on interventions to prevent cognitive decline, dementia

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Cognitive training, blood pressure management for people with hypertension, and increased physical activity all show modest but inconclusive evidence that they can help prevent cognitive decline and dementia, but there is insufficient evidence to support a public health campaign encouraging their adoption, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Researchers show first evidence of using cortical targets to improve motor function

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
University of Miami Miller School of Medicine's Dr. Monica A. Perez, Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Surgery and The Miami Project, and colleagues, recently published 'A novel cortical target to enhance hand motor output in humans with spinal cord injury' in the June issue of Brain that provides the first evidence that cortical targets could represent a novel therapeutic site for improving motor function in humans paralyzed by spinal cord injury.

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