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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 17 horas 16 mins

Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. The changes were especially positive for African-American women.

Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.

Have new appointment wait times improved at VA health care system?

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
This study compared new appointment wait times in the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system with wait times in the private sector. Wait time data were for primary care, dermatology, cardiology or orthopedics at VA medical centers in 15 major metropolitan areas and private sector comparison data came from a published survey.

Is marketing of opioids to physicians associated with overdose deaths?

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
This study examined the association between pharmaceutical company marketing of opioids to physicians and subsequent death from prescription opioid overdoses across US counties. The study, which analyzed industry marketing information data and national data on opioid prescribing and overdose deaths, reports almost $40 million in opioid marketing was targeted to more than 67,500 physicians across more than 2,200 counties from August 2013 to December 2015.

Why do Hydra end up with just a single head?

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
Hydra is able to regenerate any part of its body to rebuild an entire individual. The head organizer performs two opposite activities, one activating, which causes the head to differentiate, and the other inhibiting, which prevents the formation of supernumerary heads. Researchers at UNIGE have discovered the identity of the inhibitor, called Sp5, and deciphered the dialogue between these two antagonistic activities, which helps maintain a single-headed adult body and organize an appropriate regenerative response.

No substantial benefit from transplantation reported for a high-risk leukemia subtype

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
Study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found treatment guided by measuring minimal residual disease was associated with better outcomes for hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids.

Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration

Jue, 01/17/2019 - 23:00
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the Leiden University Medical Center have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated. The discovery, published in Brain, is an important step towards the development of a new treatment for people with nerve damage.

Fighting deadly drug resistant bacteria in intestines with new antibiotic

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially deadly infection in the large intestine most common in people who need to take antibiotics for a long period of time, particularly in Australia's ageing population. But when doses of a new antibiotic called Ramizol were given to hamsters infected with a lethal dose of the bacteria, a significant proportion of hamsters survived the infection.

Killer blows? Knockout study of pair of mouse MicroRNA provides cancer insight

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers used knockout mouse models created by gene editing to reveal that the miRNA miR-146b, like miR-146a, is involved in the development of cancers, with them having similar but not identical effects. The knockout mice showed high rates of B-cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia, which was associated with the absence of miRNA causing NF-κB overactivation. These insights should help in the fight against cancers involving miRNA dysregulation.

Poor sleep and heart-related death

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems. Research shows for the first time that poor blood oxygenation is a good indicator of the chance of heart-related death, which cannot be attributed to sleep apnoea alone.

Potential biotech and health applications with new knowledge on bacteria and viruses

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
University of Otago research to better understand how bacteria and their viruses interact and evolve will enable future studies to exploit the use of bacteria and their viruses for potential biotechnology and health applications.

Bioethicists call for oversight of consumer 'neurotechnologies' with unproven benefits

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
The marketing of consumer 'neurotechnologies' can be enticing: apps that diagnose a mental state, and brain devices that improve cognition or 'read' one's emotional state. However, many of these increasingly popular products aren't fully supported by science and have little to no regulatory oversight, which poses potential health risks to the public. Two bioethicists suggest the creation of a working group that would further study, monitor, and provide guidance for this growing industry -- which is expected to top $3 billion by 2020.

Unraveling of 58-year-old corn gene mystery may have plant-breeding implications

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
In discovering a mutant gene that 'turns on' another gene responsible for the red pigments sometimes seen in corn, researchers solved an almost six-decades-old mystery with a finding that may have implications for plant breeding in the future.

Automated text messages improve outcomes after joint replacement surgery

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
An automated text messaging system increases patient engagement with home-based exercise and promotes faster recovery after total knee or hip replacement surgery, reports a study in the Jan. 16, 2019, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Bee surveys in newest US national park could aid pollinator studies elsewhere

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Declines in native bee populations are widely reported, but can existing data really analyze these trends? Utah State University and USDA entomologists Meiners, Griswold and Messinger Carril report findings about pollinator biodiversity in California's Pinnacle National Park derived from three separate surveys spanning 17 years and say similar studies in other areas are needed.

2017 Women's March solidarity events drew 100 times national protest average, study shows

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Based on a survey of sister marches across the United States, key characteristics of the events were massive turnout, majority female leadership, low rate of counterdemonstrators, substantial grassroots mobilization and strong support from faith-based groups.

Discovery of enhanced bone growth could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
UCLA and UC San Francisco biologists have discovered a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice -- research that could potentially lead to stronger bone density in women and new treatments for osteoporosis in older women. The researchers found that blocking a set of signals from a small number of neurons in the brain causes female mice to build super-strong bones and maintain them into old age.

Salad, soda and socioeconomic status: Mapping a social determinant of health in Seattle

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
Seattle residents who live in waterfront neighborhoods tend to have healthier diets compared to those who live along Interstate-5 and Aurora Avenue, according to new research on social disparities from the University of Washington School of Public Health. The study used local data to model food consumption patterns by city block. Weekly servings of salad and soda served as proxies for diet quality.

New combination blood test for pancreatic cancer may catch disease earlier

Mié, 01/16/2019 - 23:00
A new approach to pancreatic cancer screening may help doctors detect the disease in people at high risk before it reaches more advanced and difficult-to treat stages.A team led by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists has developed a new, simple blood test that, when combined with an existing test, detects nearly 70 percent of pancreatic cancers with a less than 5 percent false-positive rate.

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