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Actualizado: hace 19 horas 25 mins

Immunotherapy is safe and feasible in cancer patients treated for HIV, study suggests

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Immunotherapy has been a major breakthrough in oncology -- but little is known about its safety for HIV-positive cancer patients. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich has now provided data to suggest that treatment with PD-1/PD-L-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which target the very system affected by the HIV virus, is feasible in this patient population for whom cancer is currently one of the principal cause of mortality.

Large regional differences in endoscopic sinus surgery in Finland

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
According to recent research, there are large differences in the frequency of endoscopic sinus surgery performed due to chronic rhinosinusitis between hospital districts in Finland.

Researchers suggest new model for measuring growth in students' proficiency in MOOCs

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and KU Leuven have developed a method of measuring growth in students' proficiency in digital learning environments. It helps to see the progress of online course participants in dynamics, i.e., to understand how students study and how the course works. The results of the study have been published in the journal Behaviour Research Methods.

Dena Haritos Tsamitis secures $5 million NSF award for CyberCorps Scholarship for Service program

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
At a time when demand for cybersecurity expertise has never been higher, Carnegie Mellon University has just been awarded a $5 million renewal of its National Science Foundation CyberCorps Scholarship for Service program through 2023. Led by Dr. Dena Haritos Tsamitis, the Barbara Lazarus Professor in Information Networking and director of Information Networking Institute, the SFS@CMU program provides students a full-tuition scholarship and a generous stipend in exchange for government service in a cybersecurity role.

Pregnancy possible after chemotherapy for breast cancer patients, but many no longer wish

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Chemotherapy is known to have a negative impact on the reproductive potential of young breast cancer patients. Its effects on women's post-treatment fertility, however, are still poorly understood. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, has confirmed that natural pregnancies are possible after chemotherapy but that survivors' desire to have children decreases greatly after treatment, calling into question the need for systematic recourse to fertility preservation measures.

Securing access to optimal cancer care through innovation, integration and sustainability

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Securing access to optimal cancer care for all patients can only be achieved through integrated, sustainable translation of today's scientific advances into tomorrow's treatments, reinforced by a clear understanding of the magnitude of clinical effects and accurate identification of patients most likely to benefit.

The neurobiology of social aggression

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Bullying and aggression carry heavy societal costs. For the first time, Duke-NUS researchers have found a signalling mechanism in the brain that shapes social behaviour -- specifically a growth factor protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), which affects social dominance. This novel discovery has implications for a deeper understanding of the neurobiology of aggression and bullying.

New study may provide clues to how birds began to fly

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
For the first time, researchers have measured what is known as the ground effect of flying animals -- and it turns out that they save a lot more energy by flying close to the ground than previously believed. The study from Lund University in Sweden supports one of the theories on how birds began to fly.

Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish revealsprinciples of control and development of a biologicalinvisibility cloak.

Monkeys do not start to resemble their parents before puberty

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Leipzig presented experienced human raters with digital images of rhesus macaques of different ages and asked them to identify related individuals. They found that although infant rhesus macaque faces are individually distinguishable, only just before they reach puberty can offspring be matched correctly to the faces of their parents.

A single missing gene leads to miscarriage

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
A single gene of the mother plays such a crucial role in the development of the placenta that its dysfunction leads to miscarriages. Researchers from the Medical Faculty of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have observed this in so-called knockout mice that were specifically modified for this purpose. These mice lack the gene for the transcription factor Math6. By conducting further analyses, the research team is now hoping to gain new insights into the role the gene plays in recurrent miscarriage in humans.

The stress-free way to listen to your unborn baby's heart

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Checking the heartbeat of babies in the womb is set to become more accurate and less stressful for expectant mothers thanks to research by the University of Sussex.

Patients at risk of coverage denial

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed a national sample of Emergency Department visits between 2011-15 to determine what proportion of them could be denied coverage if commercial insurers across the US adopted the policy of a large national insurer, Anthem Inc., to potentially deny coverage, after the visit, based on ED discharge diagnoses.

Link found between chronic inflammation and risk for Alzheimer's disease

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
While it is widely shown that possessing the ApoE4 gene is the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), not all ApoE4 carriers develop AD. For the first time, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have shown that ApoE4 linked with chronic inflammation dramatically increases the risk for AD. This can be detected by sequential measurements of C-reactive protein, a common clinical test which can be could be done routinely in a clinical setting.

New way to prevent heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Research shows metformin, a commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes prevents heart disease in patients with type 1 diabetes.

HER2+ early breast cancers where shorter-course trastuzumab could be an option

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Women with HER2-positive early breast cancer with small tumours have similar disease-free survival and lower risk of cardiac toxicity with a nine-week course of adjuvant trastuzumab compared to those treated for one year, according to a subgroup analysis of the Short-HER trial reported at ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

Restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland affect women's health, study shows

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Despite a policy change to provide free abortion services for women traveling from Northern Ireland to clinics in Great Britain, Northern Irish women still experience multiple barriers accessing care. The study also found that some women preferred to use medication from online telemedicine services to self-manage their own abortions at home, but that the experience is dominated by fear and isolation due to the risk of prosecution.

Pod-based electronic cigarette use among California youth

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Adolescents and young adults who used new pod-based electronic cigarettes commonly did so along with other e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes.

Juul e-cigarettes pose addiction risk for young users, Stanford study finds

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
Teens and young adults who use Juul brand e-cigarettes are failing to recognize the product's addictive potential, despite using it more often than their peers who smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

How to avoid raising a materialistic child

Jue, 10/18/2018 - 22:00
If you're a parent, you may be concerned that materialism among children has been on the rise. But there's some good news. A new study published in the Journal of Positive Psychology suggests that some parenting tactics can curb kids' materialistic tendencies.

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