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'Selfish brain' wins out when competing with muscle power, study finds

Jue, 10/19/2017 - 22:00
New research on our internal trade-off when physical and mental performance are put in direct competition has found that cognition takes less of a hit, suggesting more energy is diverted to the brain than body muscle. Researchers say the findings support the 'selfish brain' theory of human evolution.

Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction

Jue, 10/19/2017 - 22:00
One of the largest global mass extinctions did not fundamentally change marine ecosystems, scientists have found.

New IOF Compendium documents osteoporosis, its management and global burden

Jue, 10/19/2017 - 22:00
On the occasion of World Osteoporosis Day, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has issued the first edition of a comprehensive and scientifically referenced report on osteoporosis. The 'IOF Compendium of Osteoporosis' will be available in five languages, is to be periodically updated, and is intended as an authoritative reference document for all key stakeholders in the field of musculoskeletal health.

E-cigarettes may trigger unique and potentially damaging immune responses

Jue, 10/19/2017 - 22:00
E-cigarettes appear to trigger unique immune responses as well as the same ones that cigarettes trigger that can lead to lung disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Delayed word processing could predict patients' potential to develop Alzheimer's disease

Jue, 10/19/2017 - 22:00
A delayed neurological response to processing the written word could be an indicator that a patient with mild memory problems is at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered.

Barrow researchers use novel imaging to predict spinal degeneration

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Research by a Barrow Neurological Institute neurosurgery team on novel imaging technique assessment of patients with lumbar spine degeneration was published in the Aug. 28 issue of PLOS ONE.

How solar peaker plants could replace gas peakers

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Under a technology 2 market R&D contract with the DOE, CEO Hank Price of Solar Dynamics did the math on operating a tower CSP project in Arizona or California as a solar version of a typical gas peaker plant, by storing all of its solar energy thermally to be delivered in the evening just for 5 or 6-hours as dispatchable CSP (D-CSP). (see how CSP thermal solar storage works).

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's researchers laud FDA approval of CAR T-cell therapy

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Following a successful clinical trial involving Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, the first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy for adult cancers was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today. Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, the only facility in the northeast to be part of the clinical trial, is one of a few locations certified to offer this new therapy nationwide.

'Y' a protein unicorn might matter in glaucoma

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
A protein shaped like a 'Y' makes scientists do a double-take and may change the way they think about a protein sometimes implicated in glaucoma. The Y is a centerpiece in myocilin, binding four other components nicknamed propellers together like balloons on strings.

New NASA study improves search for habitable worlds

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
New NASA research is helping to refine our understanding of candidate planets beyond our solar system that might support life.

Maternal diet may program child for disease risk, but better nutrition later can change that

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Research has shown that a mother's diet during pregnancy, particularly one that is high-fat, may program her baby for future risk of certain diseases such as diabetes. A new study from nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois shows that switching the offspring to a new diet -- a low-fat diet, in this case -- can reverse that programming.

New gene editing approach for alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency shows promise in UMMS study

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
A study published in the journal Molecular Therapy by Christian Mueller, PhD, shows that using nuclease-free gene editing to correct cells with the mutation that causes alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency leads to repopulation of a diseased liver with healthy cells. It has the potential to prevent liver and lung damage from forming in very young alpha-1 patients.

NASA's MAVEN mission finds mars has a twisted tail

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Mars has an invisible magnetic 'tail' that is twisted by interaction with the solar wind, according to new research using data from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft.

Infidelity can be forgiven -- but at a cost

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Most people who have been unfaithful do not believe it when their partner says they forgive them. And the fact that men often do not realize that emotional infidelity is a problem just feeds the conflict.

The microbial anatomy of an organ

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
University of California San Diego researchers have developed the first 3-D spatial visualization tool for mapping 'omics' data onto whole organs. The tool helps researchers and clinicians understand the effects of chemicals, such as microbial metabolites and medications, on a diseased organ in the context of microbes that also inhabit the region. The work could advance targeted drug delivery for cystic fibrosis and other conditions where medications are unable to penetrate.

Two-dimensional materials gets a new theory for control of properties

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Desirable properties including increased electrical conductivity, improved mechanical properties, or magnetism for memory storage or information processing may be possible because of a theoretical method to control grain boundaries in two-dimensional materials, according to Penn State materials scientists.

The birth of a new protein

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
A yeast protein that evolved from scratch can fold into a compact three-dimensional shape -- contrary to the general understanding of young proteins. Recent evidence suggests new genes can arise from the non-coding sections, or 'junk,' DNA and that those new genes could code for brand-new proteins. Scientists thought such newly evolved proteins were works-in-progress that could not fold into complex shapes the way more ancient proteins do.

Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time.

Eye-catching labels stigmatize many healthy foods

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Labels such as organic, fair-trade and cage free may be eye-catching but are often free of any scientific basis and stigmatize many healthy foods, a new University of Delaware-led study found.

Expert: Be concerned about how apps collect, share health data

Mié, 10/18/2017 - 22:00
Ostherr among national experts presenting at US Department of Health and Human Services Oct. 26 'Data Privacy in the Digital Age' event.

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