Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 2 horas 49 mins

What helps form long-term memory also drives the development of neurodegenerative disease

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have just discovered that a small region of a cellular protein that helps long-term memories form also drives the neurodegeneration seen in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

Embryonic gene regulation through mechanical forces

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
During embryonic development genetic cascades control gene activity and cell differentiation. In a new publication of the journal PNAS, the team of Ulrich Technau of the Department of Molecular Evolution and Development at the University of Vienna reported that besides the genetic program, also mechanical cues can contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development. Comparisons with other animals suggests that this regulatory principle is ancient.

Designer cells: Artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Complex reaction cascades can be triggered in artificial molecular systems: Swiss scientists have constructed an enzyme than can penetrate a mammalian cell and accelerate the release of a hormone. This then activates a gene switch that triggers the creation of a fluorescent protein. The findings were reported by researchers from the NCCR Molecular Systems Engineering, led by the University of Basel and ETH Zurich.

Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Neurological research uses simplified models consisting of artificial collections of neurons. These models are often imprecise, because it is difficult to control how neurons connect to one another. Researchers at The University of Tokyo developed a technique that uses microscopic plates to guide how individual neurons grow, and showed that they can make functional connections between specific neurons. The findings may aid in the development of more precise models of neuron networks.

Oxytocin mediates subjective duration of social interactions

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Psychologists ZHOU Wen, JIANG Yi and their colleagues at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, probed this issue by examining individuals' temporal perception of social interactions and the variation among individuals, noting the gregarious nature of humans, the ubiquity of social interactions in daily life and the pronounced interindividual differences in social proficiency -- a stable personality trait.

Basin growth strata and its structural control in the region of Zhangjiakou, North Hebei, China

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
The tectonic setting and deforming kinematics of Yanshan tectonic belt are still matters of controversy. Recognizing syn-tectonic sedimentation and clarifying its relationship with structures are the key points to further reveal timing and kinematics of tectonic deformation in Yanshan belt. Now researchers in CUGB have identified five types of growth strata developed in growth structures, and suggested that 'pair' of fold-thrust belt and flexure basin might have been controlled by western Paleo-Pacific flat-slab subduction.

Non-plasma high-speed anisotropic diamond etching with nickel in 1000°C water vapor

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Development of next-generation power devices is needed for energy saving in a low carbon society. Diamond is a potentially important power device material due to its excellent physical and electronic properties. Here we have developed a non-plasma high-speed anisotropic etching process using a thermochemical reaction between nickel and diamond in high-temperature water vapor. This technology is expected to contribute to fabrication of diamond devices of excellent performance with highly reduced transmission loss and high-voltage endurance.

One-way roads for spin currents

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Scientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design, together with collaborators from University Insubria (Italy) and Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil) have shown that systems with strong interactions can rectify extremely well the flow of spins i.e. a spin current will flow much more in one direction than the other. This discovery could unlock new spintronics applications.

How wheat can root out the take-all fungus

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
In the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security on the line. Beneficial fungi can help plants to protect themselves from cousins eager to overwhelm the roots, but it's a closely fought battle. Working out the right conditions to support those beneficial fungi and identifying the cereal varieties that are best suited to make the most of that help is no mean task.

Link between tuberculosis and Parkinson's disease discovered

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
The mechanism our immune cells use to clear bacterial infections like tuberculosis (TB) might also be implicated in Parkinson's disease, according to a new study. The findings provide a possible explanation of the cause of Parkinson's disease and suggest that drugs designed to treat Parkinson's might work for TB too.

Giant invasive flatworms found in France and overseas French territories

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
One of the consequences of globalization is the introduction of invasive species. Giant hammerhead flatworms, or land planarians, up to 40 cm (over 1 foot) in length, are reported from France and overseas French territories by an international team led by Jean-Lou Justine of ISYEB (Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France). This is the first study of this invasion, reported in an article to be published in the open-access journal PeerJ.

Procedure plus medication is better than standard treatment for heart disease patients

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
A non-surgical procedure, called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), along with prescribed medication, is better than medication alone as initial treatment for people who have the most common form of heart disease, suggests an analysis of an international clinical trial co-led by St. Michael's Hospital.

A hidden world of communication, chemical warfare, beneath the soil

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
New research shows how some of these harmful microbes have to contend not just with a farmer's chemical attacks, but also with their microscopic neighbors -- and themselves turn to chemical warfare to ward off threats.

Kids show adult-like intuition about ownership

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Children as young as age three are able to make judgements about who owns an object based on its location, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

Blue dye tablet helps identify polyps during colonoscopy

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Ingestion of a blue dye tablet during bowel prep for colonoscopy could be a significant advance in the early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). When used in conjunction with colonoscopy, the blue dye increased adenoma detection rate (ADR) by nearly 9 percent, according to a study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.

New study sheds light on the opioid epidemic and challenges prevailing views about this public health crisis

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine sheds new light on the sharp rise in fatal drug overdoses in recent years, one of the most severe public health challenges of our time. The study found that the growth in fatal overdoses for non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) aged 22-56 years was sufficiently large to account for the entire growth in mortality rates (MR) and years of potential life lost (YPLL) for this population from 1999 to 2015.

Model estimates lifetime risk of Alzheimer's dementia using biomarkers

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Lifetime risks of developing Alzheimer's disease dementia vary considerably by age, gender and whether any signs or symptoms of dementia are present, according to a new study published online by Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

More patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis receiving liver transplants

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Increasingly, liver transplant centers are changing a long-standing practice of delaying potentially life-saving liver transplantation for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis until after they stopped drinking alcohol for six months, according to a new study scheduled for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018.

DNA-based vaccine treatment for colorectal cancer to undergo first human study

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
Combining a DNA vaccine, which boosts the body's immune response against tumors, with an antibody that blocks the body's natural defense against the potency of the DNA vaccine, may lead to the development of an effective treatment for late stage colorectal cancer, when a cure is not often possible. Preliminary research leading up to this trial will be presented at Digestive Disease Week® 2018.

Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free diet

Lun, 05/21/2018 - 22:00
An investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Findings of the first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2018. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symptoms, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, due to intestinal damage.

Páginas