Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 7 mins 27 segs

Mechanisms behind sensory deficits in Parkinson's disease

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Although Parkinson's disease is often associated with motor symptoms such as stiffness, poor balance and trembling, the first symptoms are often sensory and include a reduced sense of touch and smell. In a study on mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now been able to identify neural circuits and mechanisms behind this loss of sensory perception. The study, which is published in the scientific journal Neuron, may open avenues to methods of earlier diagnosis.

How the injured brain tells the body it's hurt

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.

UCI scientists find evolution in butterfly eye dependent on sex

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
By analyzing both the genes that control color detecting photoreceptors and the structural components of the eye itself, University of California, Irvine evolutionary biologists have discovered male and female butterflies of one particular species have the unique ability to see the world differently from each another because of sex-related evolutionary traits.

Region in brain found to be associated with fear of uncertain future

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
People who struggle to cope with uncertainty or the ambiguity of potential future threats may have an unusually large striatum, an area of the brain already associated with general anxiety disorder, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Tooth truth

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have developed a new method to read imperfections in teeth caused by a lack of sunlight, creating a powerful tool to trace events ranging from human evolution and migration out of Africa to the silent damage of vitamin D deficiency that continues to affect 1 billion worldwide.

Engineering heart valves for the many

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the University of Zurich announced today a cross-institutional team effort to generate a functional heart valve replacement with the capacity for repair, regeneration, and growth. The team is also working towards a GMP-grade version of their customizable, scalable, and cost-effective manufacturing process that would enable deployment to a large patient population. In addition, the new heart valve would be compatible with minimally invasive procedures to serve both pediatric and adult patients.

Flat Antarctica

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Temperatures in the Arctic are increasing twice as fast as in the rest of the globe, while the Antarctic is warming at a much slower rate. A new study published in Earth System Dynamics, a journal of the European Geosciences Union, shows that land height could be a 'game changer' when it comes to explaining why temperatures are rising at such different rates in the two regions.

There's more to attraction than what meets the eye

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Attractiveness isn't just a matter of good looks, but also the right voice and scent, highlights a mini review in Frontiers in Psychology.

First European randomized trial of PCI vs. optimized medical therapy in CTO

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
EuroPCR 2017, Paris, France: Revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) achieves a high success rate with low procedural risk in patients with coronary chronic total occlusion, show results reported at EuroPCR 2017 from the first European randomized trial to compare PCI with optimized medical therapy in this group of patients.

Neurological events with TAVI and surgical valve replacement in intermediate-risk patients

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
EuroPCR 2017, Paris, France: Patients at intermediate risk for surgery have lower risk of early neurological complications including stroke with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) than with surgical aortic valve replacement, showed results reported for the first time at EuroPCR 2017 from the large, randomized SURTAVI (Surgical Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) trial.

Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Nanoscale stretching or compressing significantly boost the performance of ceria, a material widely used in catalytic converters and clean-energy technologies, Stanford scientists report.

Using graphene to create quantum bits

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
EPFL researchers have developed a quantum capacitor based on graphene, which has multiple applications. The device is potentially useful in producing a new type of qubit, which is one of the building blocks of quantum computers. It could also be used for highly non-linear circuits.

World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Researchers pave way towards integration of 3-D holography into electronics like smart phones, computers and TVs, with development of nano-hologram 1,000 times thinner than a human hair.

Monash discovery may help unlock the key to infertility in older women

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Findings from new research led by the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) and University College London may finally resolve, and potentially provide answers, as to why older women have higher incidences of miscarriage and have babies with chromosomal abnormalities.

The Charlie Sheen effect on HIV testing

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
On Nov. 17, 2015, actor Charlie Sheen publicly disclosed he was HIV-positive on NBC's Today Show. In previous research, scientists found that Sheen's disclosure corresponded with millions of online search queries for HIV prevention and testing. A follow-up study finds it also led to more sales of in-home HIV testing kits.

Gang members, domestic extremists vastly different, says CU Boulder study

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
Domestic extremists tend to be much older, better educated, more affluent, more religious, and are more likely to be white than street gang members, according to a sweeping new University of Colorado Boulder study that systematically compares the groups for the first time.

Measuring the human impact of weather

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has announced today world records for the highest reported historical death tolls from tropical cyclones, tornadoes, lightning and hailstorms. It marks the first time the official WMO Archive of Weather and Climate Extremes has broadened its scope from strictly temperature and weather records to address the impacts of specific events.

Cancer prevention & early detection, 2017-2018

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
A new report assess cancer prevention measures in the United States and finds while there have been improvements in some areas, the use of potentially lifesaving measures is suboptimal.

Study estimates number of US women living with metastatic breast cancer

Mié, 05/17/2017 - 22:00
A new study shows that the number of women in the United States living with distant metastatic breast cancer, the most severe form of the disease, is growing.

Páginas