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PCSK9 inhibition with bococizumab yields mixed results

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
In a clinical program that was terminated early, the experimental PCSK9 inhibitor bococizumab, when given on top of effective statin therapy, had widely varying effects on LDL cholesterol levels and had no benefit on cardiovascular events among those with LDL lower than 100 mg/dL. However, in patients at high cardiovascular risk who had baseline LDL of greater than 100 mg/dL, bococizumab significantly reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 21 percent compared with placebo.

Evolocumab significantly reduces risk of cardiovascular events

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Evolocumab, one of the new targeted PCSK9 inhibitor drugs that has been shown to dramatically lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or 'bad' cholesterol, also significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with existing heart or vascular disease already on statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Skilled workers more prone to mistakes when interrupted

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Expertise is clearly beneficial in the workplace, yet highly trained workers in some occupations could actually be at risk for making errors when interrupted, indicates a new study by two Michigan State University psychology researchers.

Can quantum theory explain why jokes are funny?

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
In a recent paper published in Frontiers in Physics, researchers are taking the first steps towards of a quantum theory model of humor, to explain what really happens on the cognitive level in the moment when we 'get the joke.'

Study suggests new drug alongside statins can significantly cut cholesterol

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
A new class of cholesterol-lowering drug has been found to help patients cut their risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and heart attack.

Wi-fi on rays of light: 100 times faster, and never overloaded

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Slow wi-fi is a source of irritation that nearly everyone experiences. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have come up with a surprising solution: a wireless network based on harmless infrared rays. The capacity is not only huge (more than 40Gbit/s per ray) but also there is no need to share since every device gets its own ray of light.

The discovery of Majorana fermion

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Majorana fermion can serve as the building block of fault tolerant topological quantum computing. As a result, Majorana fermion drew great attention recently in the condensed matter physics. The current state research of Majorana fermion was published in a review article in Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.

Why water splashes: New theory reveals secrets

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
New research from the University of Warwick generates fresh insight into how a raindrop or spilt coffee splashes.

Nano-polycrystalline film leads to stronger magnetism compared to single-crystal films

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Toyohashi University of Technology researchers have found that nanoscale pillar-shaped distribution of iron in strontium titanate changes its magnetic and magnetooptical response drastically in cooperation with researchers at Myongji University, Harbin Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, University of California, San Diego, and Trinity College Dublin. Surprisingly, the polycrystalline film on the silicon substrate showed stronger magnetism than a single crystalline film.

Identification of molecular origins underlying the interfacial slip

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, has discovered the fundamental principles of handling polymers.

Children who play outside more likely to protect nature as adults

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Protecting the environment can be as easy as telling your kids to go outdoors and play, according to a new UBC study.

Atrial fibrillation patients may safely discontinue blood thinners after successful ablation

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
In new study presented today at the American College of Cardiology 66th Annual Scientific Session, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found that patients with persistent AF, who are successfully treated with ablation many, in fact, no longer need blood thinners.

The Lancet: Indigenous South American group has healthiest arteries of all populations yet studied, providing clues to healthy lifestyle

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
The Tsimane people -- a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon -- have the lowest reported levels of vascular ageing for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being five times less common than in the US, according to a study published in The Lancet and being presented at the American College of Cardiology conference.

New study finds people who have high levels of two markers at high risk of adverse heart events

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
New research suggests that GlycA, a newly identified blood marker, and C-reactive protein both independently predict major adverse cardiac events, including heart failure and death. Patients who have high levels of both biomarkers are at especially high risk.

Routine blood tests can help measure a patient's future risk for chronic disease, new study finds

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
A new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City finds that combining information from routine blood tests and age of primary care patients can create a score that measures future risk of chronic disease.

New study finds antithrombotic therapy has no benefit for low-risk atrial fibrillation patients

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Findings from a large, community-based study show that antithrombotic therapy doesn't decrease low-risk atrial fibrillation patients' risk of suffering a stroke within five years.

Sexual assault victimization disproportionately affects certain minority college students

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Students who perceive that their college campus is more inclusive and welcoming of sexual- and gender-minority people have lower odds of being victims of sexual assault, according to a study led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. In a complementary study, the researchers found that some minority groups are at considerably higher risk for sexual assault in college than peers in majority groups.

First steps in human DNA replication dance captured at atomic resolution

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
A team has published pictures at very high atomic resolution of the multi-part protein complex that performs the very first step in the incredibly complex genome-replication dance that occurs when one cell becomes two. The images of the human version of this complex, called ORC - for origin recognition complex - show it in its active mode.

Transparent ceramics make super-hard windows

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have synthesised the first transparent sample of a popular industrial ceramic at DESY. The result is a super-hard window made of cubic silicon nitride that can potentially be used under extreme conditions like in engines, as the Japanese-German team writes in the journal Scientific Reports. Cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4) forms under high pressure and is the second hardest transparent nanoceramic after diamond but can withstand substantially higher temperatures.

Untreated sleep apnea in children can harm brain cells tied to cognition and mood

Jue, 03/16/2017 - 22:00
A study comparing children 7 to 11 years old with moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea to children the same age who slept normally found significant reductions of gray matter -- brain cells crucial to most cognitive tasks -- in several regions of the brains of children with sleep apnea. The finding points to connections between this common sleep disturbance and the loss of neurons or delayed neuronal growth in the developing brain.

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