Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 34 mins 50 segs

Bolstering fat cells offers potential new leukemia treatment

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Killing cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, says a study from McMaster University published in Nature Cell Biology. Researchers with the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute found that boosting adipocytes, or fat cells, located in the bone morrow suppressed cancerous leukemia cells but -- in a surprise to the research team -- also induced the regeneration of healthy blood cells.

Gestational diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
A history of gestational diabetes was associated with a modest higher long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in women in a new study, although the absolute rate of cardiovascular disease was low in the study's younger group of predominantly white women and adhering to a healthy lifestyle over time appeared to help mitigate the risk, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.

Whales and dolphins have rich 'human-like' cultures and societies

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Whales and dolphins (cetaceans) live in tightly-knit social groups, have complex relationships, talk to each other and even have regional dialects -- much like human societies. A major new study, published today in Nature Ecology & Evolution, has linked the complexity of Cetacean culture and behavior to the size of their brains.

Chronic inflammation plays critical role in sustained delivery of new MD therapy

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Macrophages, a type of white blood cell involved in inflammation, readily take up a newly approved medication for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and promote its sustained delivery to regenerating muscle fibers long after the drug has disappeared from circulation, an experimental model study finds.

Men develop irregular heartbeat earlier than women; extra weight a factor

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
The onset of an irregular heartbeat jumps sharply in men after age 50 and in women after 60. The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight. Having atrial fibrillation more than tripled the risk of dying during average 13-year study.

How to save giant tropical fruit bats: Work with local hunters who use bat teeth as money

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Flying foxes-- giant fruit bats that look like winged German shepherd puppies-- are in trouble. But scientists suggest a new way to help protect the bats on the Solomon Islands: working with local hunters who use the bats' teeth as currency. The traditional practice, it turns out, is a positive thing for bat conservation.

Inpatient satisfaction improved by five-minute intervention, study finds

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
As hospitals seek to improve inpatient satisfaction, one effective way takes only a few minutes and no expensive equipment. A study at the University of Virginia School of Medicine recently found that a daily five-minute conversation that focused on hospitalized patients 'as people' significantly improved their satisfaction with their medical care.

Mount Sinai & Sema4 scientists identify biomarker for progression and drug response in brain cancer

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Sema4, and collaborating institutions including Colorado State University and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center reported results today from a glioblastoma study in which they validated a biomarker indicative of a patient's prognosis and likely response to specific therapies.

Is rushing your child to the ER the right response?

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
If a child gets a small burn, starts choking or swallows medication, parents may struggle to decide whether to provide first aid at home or rush them to the hospital, suggests a new national poll.

New UTSA study describes how dopamine tells you it isn't worth the wait

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
A new study in Cell Reports by Matthew Wanat, assistant professor of biology at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), sheds light on how dopamine cells in the brain signal the passage of time.

When lemons give you life: Herpetofauna adaptation to citrus orchards in Belize

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Reptile and amphibian communities exhibit a promising level of resilience to agricultural lands, confirms a study recently published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. In their study, herpetologist Russell Gray and his research team compared forested areas to manicured citrus orchards and reclaimed orchard forests in Stann Creek, Belize. Further intriguing discoveries were made when the Category 1 Hurricane Earl hit the study site.

New antibiotic resistance genes found

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found several previously unknown genes that make bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotics. The genes were found by searching large volumes of bacterial DNA and the results are published in the scientific journal Microbiome.

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake.

Flu vaccine failed to protect young leukemia patients during cancer treatment

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators said the results reinforce the importance of hand washing and other measures to help protect vulnerable patients from influenza infections.

West Virginians say Opioid epidemic most important health issue in the state

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
The opioid epidemic is the most important health issue in West Virginia, above obesity, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and dental disease, according to a state-based public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America. A strong majority of West Virginians (84%) say prescription pain medication abuse and addiction is a major problem in their community, and more than two-thirds (71%) say they know someone who experienced pain so severe they sought prescription medicines to treat it.

Study: New exercises help athletes manage dangerous breathing disorder

Dom, 10/15/2017 - 22:00
A novel set of breathing techniques developed at National Jewish Health help athletes overcome vocal cord dysfunction and improve performance during high-intensity exercise. Vocal cord dysfunction, now also referred to as exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO), has been shown to improve for athletes after being trained to use the new techniques. The findings were published in the Oct. 16, 2017, online issue of the Journal of Voice.

Fanged kangaroo research could shed light on extinction

Sáb, 10/14/2017 - 22:00
Fanged kangaroos -- an extinct family of small fanged Australian kangaroos -- might have survived at least five million years longer than previously thought.A University of Queensland-led study has found the species might have competed for resources with ancestors of modern kangaroos.

One in five witness someone collapse who requires CPR but the majority do not act

Sáb, 10/14/2017 - 22:00
An estimated one in five adults in the UK witness someone collapse who needs immediate CPR, yet the majority of people do not act, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation. Researchers at the University of Warwick carried out a survey of 2,000 people across the country to find out how likely people are to witness a life-threatening cardiac arrest.

Study calls for less shame and secrecy around menstruation in global conflict areas

Sáb, 10/14/2017 - 22:00
A new study found that girls and women in emergency contexts have inadequate access to safe and private facilities and supplies for menstrual hygiene management, and are provided with insufficient guidance by response teams on the basics of managing menstruation. Moreover, many staff have a limited understanding of what an improved response should entail, and instead, focus predominantly on supplies.

Páginas