Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 54 mins 3 segs

Patient-inspired research uncovers new link to rare disorder

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder, which has been linked only to lipid metabolism, is also associated with sugar metabolism.

Tourette Syndrome risk increases in people with genetic copy variations

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
An international team that just conducted the largest study of Tourette Syndrome has identified genetic abnormalities that are the first definitive risk genes for the disorder.

Scientists uncover origins of the Sun's swirling spicules

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
For the first time, a computer simulation -- so detailed it took a full year to run -- shows how spicules form, helping scientists understand how spicules can break free of the sun's surface and surge upward so quickly.

Intensive blood pressure lowering benefits patients with chronic kidney disease

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
In individuals with chronic kidney disease, targeting a systolic blood pressure to <120 mm Hg resulted in lower risks of cardiovascular events and premature death, compared with standard targeting to <140 mm Hg. There was a slightly faster decline in kidney function in the intensive group, but no increase in rates of kidney failure or serious adverse events.

Crowdsourced data may inaccurately represent some population groups

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
While crowdsourcing, a practice that enables study participants to submit data electronically, has grown in use for health and medical research, a study led by UC San Francisco comparing the online approach to a standard telephone survey has found that certain crowdsourced groups are either over- or underrepresented by age, race/ethnicity, education and physical activity.

Study uncovers link between male hormones and metabolic disease in polycystic ovary syndrome

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists from the University of Birmingham have discovered the link between increased male hormones and metabolic complications such as diabetes and fatty liver disease in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Study debunks claim of greatly improved survival rate for gunshot victims

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The survival rate of US gunshot victims has not shown a marked improvement, as other recent studies have suggested, according to new research from Duke University and the University of California, Davis. The purported increase in survival rate had been credited to improvements in emergency treatment and medical care of critically injured patients. But on close analysis, researchers found problems in the way data was collected and coded.

Seafood poisoning bug thwarts a key host defense by attacking the cell's cytoskeleton

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The leading cause of acute gastroenteritis linked to eating raw seafood disarms a key host defense system in a novel way: It paralyzes a cell's skeleton, or cytoskeleton.

Snake fungal disease identified in wild British snakes for first time

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Europe's wild snakes could face a growing threat from a fungal skin disease that has contributed to wild snake deaths in North America, according to an international collaborative study, led by conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) alongside partners including the US Geological Survey. The new study is published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Bacterial organizational complexities revealed

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
For the first time, scientists have visualized the fine details of bacterial microcompartment shells -- the organisms' submicroscopic nanoreactors, which are comprised completely of protein.

Research suggests sexual appeals in ads don't sell brands, products

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Ads with sexual appeals are more likely to be remembered but don't sell the brand or product, according to a meta-analysis of nearly 80 advertising studies, published online this week by the International Journal of Advertising. Researchers found no positive effect on study participants' ability to remember the brands featured in such ads or on their intention to buy the product. The research was led by University of Illinois advertising professor John Wirtz.

Mouse study suggests how hearing a warning sound turns into fearing it over time

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
An adult mouse model reveals that changes in lattice-like structures in the brain known as perineuronal nets are necessary to 'capture' an auditory fear association and 'haul' it in as a longer-term memory.

New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronics

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
In a proof-of-concept study, North Carolina State University engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.

A rising star

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
It's a tiny marine invertebrate, no more than 3 millimeters in size. But closely related to humans, Botryllus schlosseri might hold the key to new treatments for cancer and a host of vascular diseases.

How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insights

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
In a study published in Current Biology on June 22, the lab of Professor John Werren at the University of Rochester describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in order to adapt to new hosts, and proposes that co-option of single copy genes may be a common but relatively understudied mechanism of evolution for new gene functions, particularly under conditions of rapid evolutionary change.

New biomarker assay detects neuroblastoma with greater sensitivity

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have developed and tested a new biomarker assay for quantifying disease and detecting the presence of neuroblastoma even when standard evaluations yield negative results for the disease. Researchers provide the first systematic comparison of standard imaging evaluations versus the new assay that screens for five different neuroblastoma-associated genes and determine that the new assay improves disease assessment and provides prediction of disease progression.

UM research points to previously unknown pine marten diversity

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research published by a University of Montana professor.

Study examines gun policy preferences across racial groups

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Support for all forms of gun control is stronger among Latinos and blacks than whites, according to researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

UK Chemistry researchers develop catalyst that mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, the study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.

How eggs got their shapes

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists took a quantitative approach to that question and found that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg-shape variation in birds.

Páginas