Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 53 mins 50 segs

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
In an arranged marriage of optics and mechanics, physicists have created microscopic structural beams that have a variety of powerful uses when light strikes them.

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
EPFL researchers have found a way around what was considered a fundamental limitation of physics for over 100 years. They were able to conceive resonant systems that can store electromagnetic waves over a long period of time while maintaining a broad bandwidth. Their study, which has just been published in Science, opens up a number of doors, particularly in telecommunications.

Piling on pressure solves enduring mystery about metal's makeup

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Extreme pressure experiments and powerful supercomputing have enabled scientists to solve a decades-old puzzle about the fundamental properties of the widely used metal lithium.

Ancient Egyptians to modern humans: Coronary artery disease genes benefit reproduction

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have found that genes for coronary heart disease (CAD) also influence reproduction, so in order to reproduce successfully, the genes for heart disease will also be inherited.

Switchable DNA mini-machines store information

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Biomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes.The arrays' inventors say they could be harnessed to make nanotech sensors or amplifiers. Potentially, they could be combined to form logic gates, the parts of a molecular computer.

Study sheds light on how bacterial organelles assemble

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Michigan State University are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work could benefit research in bioenergy and pathogenesis, and it could lead to new methods of bioengineering bacteria for beneficial purposes.

Using science to combat addiction

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
In this Policy Forum, Keith Humphreys and colleagues highlight the need for science, and particularly neuroscience, to inform policies that address addiction.

Finally, understanding how the sun's spicules are made

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
For the first time, researchers have built a model that accurately explains the formation of abundant jets of plasma in the Sun's atmosphere, called spicules.

Greater emphasis on preventing, treating heart disease in women needed

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Women and physicians do not put enough emphasis on cardiovascular disease in women, and a social stigma regarding body weight may be a primary barrier to these important discussions, according to research publishing today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Personalized exoskeletons are taking support one step farther

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have developed an exoskeleton system that provides personalized support for its user. In healthy volunteers, the optimized exoskeleton reduced energy expenditure during walking by 24 percent, on average, compared to when the system was not providing personalized support.

Flight ability of birds affects the shape of their eggs

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Many different theories exist as to why the shape of bird eggs varies so much across species, and now, new research yields evidence that variable egg shape is driven by unique flight adaptations.

New efficient, low-temperature catalyst for hydrogen production

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have developed a new low-temperature catalyst for producing high-purity hydrogen gas while simultaneously using up carbon monoxide (CO). The discovery could improve the performance of fuel cells that run on hydrogen fuel but can be poisoned by CO.

Cracking the mystery of avian egg shape

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
According to new research, egg shape in birds is related to adaptations for efficient flight -- and a mechanistic model reveals how different egg shapes may be formed.

Localized signaling islands in cells: New targets for precision drug design

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
New research overturns long-held views on a basic messaging system within living cells. Key cellular communication machinery is more regionally constrained within the cell than previously thought. The findings suggest new approaches to designing precision drugs. Localizing drug action at a specific 'address' within the cell could mean fewer side effects in treating cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other serious conditions.

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Research from the Stowers Institute provides evidence suggesting that cancer cells might streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily. The study, conducted in both human and mouse cells, shows that cancer genomes lose copies of repetitive sequences known as ribosomal DNA. While downsizing might enable these cells to replicate faster, it also seems to render them less able to withstand DNA damage.

Nearly half of US women don't know heart disease is their No. 1 killer

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Women and their physicians are largely uneducated when it comes to females and heart disease, putting women's health and lives at greater risk, a new study out today shows. The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, shows that 45 percent of US women are not aware that heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women.

Scientists uncover potential mechanism for HPV-induced skin cancer

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have identified a molecular pathway by which some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) might increase the risk of skin cancer, particularly in people with the rare genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The novel pathway is described in PLOS Pathogens.

New brain network model could explain differences in brain injuries

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Considering the brain's network of activity, rather than just individual regions, could help us understand why some brain injuries are much worse than others, according to a study published PLOS Computational Biology by Maxwell B. Wang, Julia Owen, and Pratik Mukherjee from University of California, San Francisco, and Ashish Raj from Weill Cornell Medicine.

Human genes for coronary artery disease make them more prolific parents

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Coronary artery disease may have persisted in human populations because the genes that cause this late-striking disease also contribute to greater numbers of children, reports Dr Sean Byars of The University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Michael Inouye of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia, in a study published June 22, 2017 in PLOS Genetics.

Simulated honeybees can use simple brain circuits for complex learning

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Honeybees may not need key brain structures known as mushroom bodies in order to learn complex associations between odors and rewards, according to new research published in PLOS Computational Biology.

Páginas