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NASA water vapor data shows a 'patchy' Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at water vapor in the Atlantic Ocean's Sub-Tropical Storm Ernesto and found the storm looking somewhat "patchy." NASA's GPM satellite provided an earlier look at Ernesto's rainfall and cloud heights. Ernesto is on track to visit the United Kingdom by the end of the week.

Wheat code finally cracked; wheat genome sequence will bring stronger varieties to farmers

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, published today in the international journal Science a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world's most widely cultivated crop.

New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell's internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease or some cancers.

Study: Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries, says a new study by University of Illinois researchers.

Lowering pH inside cells may put the brakes on cancer growth

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study focusing on the environment inside cancer cells may lead to new targeted treatment strategies. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Maryland and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona, suggest that lowering the pH inside cancer cells to make it more acidic can slow down the growth and spread of the disease, and possibly provide new options for treatment. Their results were published in Nature Communications.

UTHealth-led study shows much work remains to ensure e-health record safety

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Four years after their publication by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), voluntary guidelines designed to increase the safety of e-health records have yet to be implemented fully, according to a survey led by a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Findings appeared recently in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

NASA finds intensifying Tropical Storm Lane

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Tropical Storm Lane continues to strengthen and NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared imagery that showed storms have intensified around its center.

How a 'jellyfish'-shaped structure relieves pressure in your cells

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Scientists at Scripps Research have solved the structure of a key protein that senses when our cells swell.

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A fabric coating with thin, lightweight and flexible pressure sensors that can be embedded into shoes and other functional garments, sensors that can measure everything from the light touch of a finger to being driven over by a forklift. And it's comfortable to boot!

First mouse model to mimic lung disease could speed discovery of more effective treatments

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A team of researchers from Penn Medicine has developed the first mouse model with an IPF-associated mutation, which induces scarring and other damage similar to what is observed in humans suffering from the condition.

'Abrupt thaw' of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study.

Obesity, infertility and oxidative stress in mouse egg cells

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Proteomic analysis of oocytes from obese mice showed changes in a protein that promotes antioxidant production and may alter meiotic spindles.

New approach to fight tuberculosis, a leading cause of death worldwide

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A group of researchers from the Gladstone Institutes, UC San Francisco (UCSF), and UC Berkeley used a systematic approach to get an entirely new look at the way tuberculosis infects people. Their study, published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell, uncovered interactions between tuberculosis and human proteins that could provide new approaches to combat infection.

More protein after weight loss may reduce fatty liver disease

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Increasing the amount of protein in the diet may reduce the liver's fat content and lower the risk of diabetes in people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology--Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Hubble paints picture of the evolving universe

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe's evolutionary history.

Taking a closer look at unevenly charged biomolecules

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Clinicians most often monitor antibodies because these small proteins attach to antigens, or foreign substances, we face every day. Most biomolecules, however, have complicated charge characteristics, and the sensor response from conventional carbon nanotube systems can be erratic. A team in Japan recently revealed how these systems work and proposed changes to dramatically improve biomolecule detection. They report their findings in the Journal of Applied Physics.

UMD researcher helps to crack the genetic code for wheat for the first time

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The University of Maryland as part of the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium published findings in Science detailing the full wheat genome, the world's most widely cultivated crop. A companion paper is available in the same issue with UMD and the John Innes Centre, using this sequence to examine gene expression in wheat, specifically relating to heat, drought, and disease. This paves the way for wheat varieties adapted to climate, enhancing yields, nutrition, and sustainability.

When sulfur disappears without trace

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Many natural products and drugs feature a so-called dicarbonyl motif -- in certain cases however their preparation poses a challange to organic chemists. In their most recent work, Nuno Maulide and his coworkers from the University of Vienna present a new route for these molecules. They use oxidized sulfur compounds even though sulfur is not included in the final product. The results are now published in the prestigious journal Science.

Scientists create new technology and solve a key puzzle for cellular memory

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
With a new groundbreaking technique, researchers from University of Copenhagen have managed to identify a protein that is responsible for cellular memory being transmitted when cells divide. The finding is crucial for understanding development from one cell to a whole body.

Physicists fight laser chaos with quantum chaos to improve laser performance

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
To tame chaos in powerful semiconductor lasers, which causes instabilities, scientists have introduced another kind of chaos.

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