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Computer systems predict objects' responses to physical forces

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Presenting their work at this year's Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, Prof. Josh Tenenbaum and one of his students, Jiajun Wu, are co-authors on four papers that examine the fundamental cognitive abilities that an intelligent agent requires to navigate the world: discerning distinct objects and inferring how they respond to physical forces.

National MagLab's latest magnet snags world record, marks new era of scientific discovery

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has shattered another world record with the testing of a 32-tesla magnet -- 33 percent stronger than what had previously been the world's strongest superconducting magnet used for research and more than 3,000 times stronger than a small refrigerator magnet.

Northeast farmers weigh warming climate, drenched fields

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Farmers in the Northeast are adapting to longer growing seasons and warming climate conditions -- but they may face spring-planting whiplash as they confront fields increasingly saturated with rain, according to a research paper published in the journal Climatic Change.

Single-stranded DNA and RNA origami go live

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A novel approach published in Science by a collaborative team of researchers from the Wyss Institute, Arizona State University, and Autodesk for the first time enables the design of complex single-stranded DNA and RNA origami that can autonomously fold into diverse, stable, user-defined structures.

Bioluminescent worm found to have iron superpowers

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego have made a discovery with potential human health impacts in a parchment tubeworm, found to have ferritin with the fastest catalytic performance ever described.

All politics -- and cannabis marketing -- are local

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
California's legal cannabis market, opening for business on Jan. 1, is expected to quickly grow to be the largest in the nation and worth more than $5 billion a year. County voting on Proposition 64 that led the state here -- to legalizing sales for recreational use -- can offer insight into how medical marijuana dispensaries will now market themselves.

Food-induced anaphylaxis common among children despite adult supervision

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
At least a third of reactions in children with food-induced anaphylaxis to a known allergen occur under adult supervision, according to a new study led by AllerGen researchers in Quebec, Ontario and Alberta. The findings, published in the November issue of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, reveal that inadvertent exposures to a known food allergen in children are frequent, and in the majority of supervised reactions, adults other than the child's parents were present.

ANU archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooks

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
An archaeologist from The Australian National University has uncovered the world's oldest known fish-hooks placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor.

One in 5 materials chemistry papers may be wrong, study suggests

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Can companies rely on the results of one or two scientific studies to design a new industrial process or launch a new product? In at least one area of materials chemistry, the answer may be yes -- but only 80 percent of the time.

UA experts: Valley fever cases see major spike in November

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
An uptick in reported cases of Valley fever indicates a likely sharp increase in infections next year. At the same time, federal clearance for a rapid assay test developed with assistance from the University of Arizona should help reduce delays in diagnosing the respiratory fungal disease caused by spores found in area soils.

Conserving the forests

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
UCSB economist Robert Heilmayr and colleagues evaluate certification programs as options for sustaining tropical forests.

Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
While engineers have had success building tiny, insect-like robots, programming them to behave autonomously like real insects continues to present technical challenges. A group of Cornell University engineers has been experimenting with a new type of programming that mimics the way an insect's brain works, which could soon have people wondering if that fly on the wall is actually a fly.

Kent State researcher exposes MRSA risk at northeast Ohio beaches

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Tara C. Smith, Ph.D., a professor of epidemiology in Kent State's College of Public Health, published the findings of a study her lab conducted in 2015 that shows a higher-than-expected prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at beaches around Lake Erie.

Baylor study: Bosses who 'phone snub' their employees risk losing trust, engagement

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Supervisors who cannot tear themselves away from their smartphones while meeting with employees risk losing their employees' trust and, ultimately, their engagement, according to new research from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business.

GAMBIT narrows the hiding places for 'new physics'

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The elementary particles of 'new physics' must be so massive that their detection in the LHC, the largest modern accelerator, will not be possible. This none- too-optimistic conclusion comes from the most comprehensive review of observational data from many scientific experiments and their confrontation with several popular varieties of supersymmetry theory. The complicated, extremely computationally demanding analysis was carried out by the team of the international GAMBIT Collaboration -- and leaves a shadow of hope.

NASA researchers share perspective on key elements of ozone layer recovery

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Each year, ozone-depleting compounds in the upper atmosphere destroy the protective ozone layer, and in particular above Antarctica.

Climate scientists study the odds of a US megadrought

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
To help untangle fact from speculation, Cornell University climate scientists and their colleagues have developed a 'robust null hypothesis' to assess the odds of a megadrought -- one that lasts more than 30 years -- occurring in the western and southwestern United States. The research was published online in the Journal of Climate.

Drug discovery could accelerate hugely with machine learning

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Drug discovery could be significantly accelerated thanks to a new high precision machine-learning model, developed by an international collaboration of researchers, including the University of Warwick.

Artificial intelligence helps accelerate progress toward efficient fusion reactions

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Article describes development of a deep learning neural network to predict disruptions on fusion plasmas.

Study suggests social workers lack tools to identify potential chronic child neglect

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Neglect accounts for the majority of all child protection cases in the United States, yet child welfare workers lack effective assessment tools for identifying the associated risk and protective factors of chronic neglect. The ineffective assessments are often the result of using instruments that are not specifically designed to include elements predicting chronic neglect, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team.

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