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Researchers create self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Instead of oil, coal, or even solar energy, self-sustaining bacterial fuel cells may power the future.Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria.

Metabolites of Resveratrol (Longevinex) pass through blood-ocular barriers in humans

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
On the heels of a study published last year that showed the red wine molecule resveratrol and its metabolites are found in human cerebrospinal fluid and therefore penetrate the blood-brain barrier, for the first time metabolites of the red wine molecule resveratrol have been detected in ocular tissues of humans as well. [Neurology Oct 2015; Journal Ophthalmology March 20, 2017]

AMP issues best practice guidelines for next-generation sequencing-based oncology panel validation

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
AMP has published consensus recommendations that will help clinical laboratory professionals achieve high-quality sequencing results and deliver better care for cancer patients

'Super sponge' promises effective toxic clean-up of lakes and more

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Mercury is very toxic and can cause long-term health damage, but removing it from water is challenging. To address this growing problem, University of Minnesota College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Sciences (CFANS) Professor Abdennour Abbas and his lab team created a sponge that can absorb mercury from a polluted water source within seconds.

Hospital or home? Guidelines to assess older people who have fallen

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Guidelines to help paramedics make the right decision for older people who have fallen are safe, cost-effective and help reduce further 999 calls, according to new research led by a team at Swansea University Medical School.

Method speeds testing of new networking protocols

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
At the Usenix Symposium on Networked Systems Design and Implementation later this month, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory will present a system for testing new traffic management protocols that requires no alteration to network hardware but still works at realistic speeds -- 20 times as fast as networks of software-controlled routers.

Research evaluates treatment of thyroid disease in pregnancy

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
New research indicates that universal screening for and subsequent treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism does not result in improved health outcomes for mothers or babies. The research was conducted through the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network and has been published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Stars don't have to be massive to evaporate material from around nearby stars and affect their ability to form planets, a new study suggests.

Streamlined analysis could help people better manage their emotions

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The strategies people use to manage their emotions fall into three core groupings, according to newly published research from the University at Buffalo. Since a lot of psychopathology is related to difficulty in regulating emotions, the findings may benefit researchers and clinicians trying to better understand and treat a range of psychological disorders, everything from anxiety to substance abuse, by streamlining assessment and giving people the tools necessary to more constructively work with their emotions.

Surveiling the consumer for loyalty and profit

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Surveillance may be a dirty word when it comes to domestic politics, but understanding what interests the consumer and how technology may provide insights is a legitimate concern of retailers. Exactly which technologies yield the appropriate balance of potential profits and privacy can be a confounding dilemma. Marketing Professors J. Jeffrey Inman and Hristina Nikolova reviewed recent retail technologies and created a guide to help retailers find their way through.

Spreading rumors on Twitter and mistaking retweets for truth

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study of the believability of information received via Twitter and the intention to pass on a tweet -- whether news or rumor -- is influenced by the number of times the information has already been retweeted.

Safety of autologous Schwann cell transplantation demonstrated following SCI

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A Phase I clinical trial that targeted individuals with new onset paraplegia to evaluate the safety of transplanting their own potentially neuroprotective Schwann cells into a trauma-induced spinal cord lesion showed no evidence of adverse effects after 1 year.

Study affirms premature infants in NICUs do better with light touch

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When premature infants were given more 'supportive touch' experiences, including skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding, their brains responded more strongly to light touch, according to an international research team from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Monroe Carell's Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee, and Lausanne University in Switzerland.

Income should be the dominant factor for reforming health care says the American public

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study on reforming US healthcare showed that Americans believe a health insurance policy should be about 5 percent of household income to be affordable. They also feel that younger people could pay somewhat more for health insurance and that healthier people could afford to pay more than those in poor health. The current health reform proposal forwarded by speaker Paul Ryan offers a fixed tax credit rather than one based upon household income.

UF Health diabetes researchers discover way to expand potent regulatory cells

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
For parents, storing their newborn baby's umbilical cord blood is a way to preserve potentially lifesaving cells. Now, a group of University of Florida Health researchers has found a way to expand and preserve certain cord-blood cells as a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes.

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the US have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores efforts to change this practice.

Minitablets help medicate picky cats

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.

Sea urchin spines could fix bones

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. They report their degradable bone scaffold, which they tested in animals, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

The Cerberus Groundsnake is a Critically Endangered new species from Ecuador

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The snake fauna of Central and South America seems largely under-researched, since as many as thirty-three species of a single genus have been discovered in the last ten years only. Recently, a team of scientists have studied the hereditary molecular differences in this genus and described three new colubrid species in the open access journal ZooKeys. Among the new reptiles, there is a species which is to be known under the common name Cerberus Groundsnake.

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips (video)

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-on-a-glove.' The report on the glove appears in the journal ACS Sensors.

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