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Phantom limb sensation explained

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
After a limb amputation, brain areas responsible for movement and sensation alter their functional communication. This is the conclusion of a new study published today in Scientific Reports. According to the authors, from the D'Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR) and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the findings may help to understand why some patients report phantom sensations and others do not.

New paper provides design principles for disease-sensing nanomaterials

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
A newly published paper from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College, outlines novel design guidance that could rapidly advance development of disease-sensing nanomaterials for use in new drug development.

In small groups, people follow high-performing leaders

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have cracked the code on how leaders arise from small groups of people over time. The work is detailed in a study, 'Social information and Spontaneous Emergence of Leaders in Human Groups,' published in The Royal Society Interface. The team included Maurizio Porfiri, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and of biomedical engineering at NYU Tandon and Shinnosuke Nakayama, postdoctoral researcher at NYU Tandon.

How to keep stink bugs out this winter

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Every winter stink bugs infiltrate homes across the United States and two new studies published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Virginia Tech researchers may shed some light on ways to keep the pests away.

NASA infrared image shows powerful center of Typhoon Wutip

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Wutip as it threatens Chuuk and Yap States in the Southern Pacific Ocean. Wutip has strengthened into a typhoon.

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
JILA researchers have made a long-lived, record-cold gas of molecules that follow the wave patterns of quantum mechanics instead of the strictly particle nature of ordinary classical physics. The creation of this gas boosts the odds for advances in fields such as designer chemistry and quantum computing.

10 percent of Chinese adults have high heart disease risk, aren't treated for it

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Researchers at Yale and at the National Center for Cardiovascular Disease in China just quantified a significant opportunity to improve Chinese heart health: 1 in 10 middle-aged Chinese adults are at high risk for heart disease, yet only about 3 percent of those at-risk are taking either statins or aspirin, the recommended therapies for managing that risk. This study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Height gap with parents, not genetics, determines onset of puberty -- Ben-Gurion U. study

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
'A child who hits puberty earlier than his peers, but at a time consistent with a parental height gap model, should be considered 'healthy',' Dr. Limony says. 'We believe having the ability to determine normal ranges more accurately will reduce the need for unnecessary diagnostic procedures and help doctors better explain the emergence of early- or late-onset puberty to concerned parents.'

Too hot for comfort: the physiological dangers of extreme heat

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
A new review of more than 140 studies explores the physiological dangers that climate change will likely have on animal life, including humans. The review is published in the journal Physiology.

Salk scientists uncover how high-fat diet drives colorectal cancer growth

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
A new study led by Salk Institute scientists suggests that high-fat diets fuel colorectal cancer growth by upsetting the balance of bile acids in the intestine and triggering a hormonal signal that lets potentially cancerous cells thrive. The findings, which appeared in Cell on Feb. 21, 2019, could explain why colorectal cancer, which can take decades to develop, is being seen in younger people growing up at a time when higher-fat diets are common.

NASA takes an infrared analysis of Tropical Cyclone Oma

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite revealed where the strongest storms were located within the Southern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Cyclone Oma.

Price transparency helps Arizona health system achieve financial turnaround

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Efforts to understand costs and openly share information on healthcare prices played a key role in a major Arizona health system's successful turnaround from a financial crisis, according to a feature article in the Spring issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). This journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Believing in yourself can backfire when investing in equity crowdfunded ventures

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Normally, it's good to believe in yourself. But research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business indicates that it can be bad advice for amateurs investing online in unregulated, sometimes risky, equity crowdfunded ventures.

Expanding the use of silicon in batteries, by preventing electrodes from expanding

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Silicon anodes are generally viewed as the next development in lithium-ion battery technology. Silicon's ability to absorb more charge translates to longer battery life and smaller batteries, if researchers can check the physical expansion of the silicon that comes with charging. Research from Drexel University and the Trinity College in Ireland, suggests that adding MXene ink to the silicon electrode-making process would do just that.

New drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clears phase 1 clinical trial testing in boys

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have few treatment options. Medications currently available or in development either target only a subset of DMD patients with a particular genetic mutation or cause significant side effects.

Report offers evidence-based recommendations aimed at reducing Illinois gun violence

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Ilinois could reduce the number of people killed each year by gun violence by implementing ten policies supported by available research, according to a new report authored by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research. The center is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

New 'interspecies communication' strategy between gut bacteria and mammalian hosts uncovered

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Bacteria in the gut do far more than help digest food in the stomachs of their hosts, they can also tell the genes in their mammalian hosts what to do. A study published today in Cell describes a form of 'interspecies communication' in which bacteria secrete a specific molecule -- nitric oxide -- that allows them to communicate with and control their hosts' DNA, and suggests that the conversation between the two may broadly influence human health.

Current tools have low accuracy for predicting delayed ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
Both CT angiography and transcranial Doppler have limited accuracy in detecting cerebral vasospasm and predicting delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to ruptured aneurysm, reports a study in the inaugural edition of Critical Care Explorations, the official open-access journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease.

Tornado fatalities continue to fall, despite population growth in Tornado Alley

Mié, 02/20/2019 - 23:00
The rate of tornado-related fatalities increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century. Around 1916, that trend started to reverse.

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