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Women who breastfeed for at least five months have more kids

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Cornell University professor of sociology Vida Maralani found in new research that women who breastfeed their first child for five months or longer are more likely to have three of more children, and less likely to have only one child.

A little labeling goes a long way

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
New research from Northwestern University reveals that infants can use even a few labeled examples to spark the acquisition of object categories. Those labeled examples lead infants to initiate the process of categorization, after which they can integrate all subsequent objects, labeled or unlabeled, into their evolving category representation.

People can handle the truth (more than you think)

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and determines that people can often afford to be more honest than they think.

Firmware at the blink of an eye: Scientists develop new technology of alloy steel rolling

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
A research team from the NUST MISIS Department of Pressure Metal Treatment has developed a new technology which simplifies the process of hot rolling seamless pipes made of alloy and high-alloy steel. The consistent use of two simple male punches, tools that turn an unruly steel blank into a hollow "sleeve", is a distinctive feature of the technology.

if pigeons were brilliant, would they flock?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
UC Davis researcher looked at how people behave in simple reasoning games and found that people are usually driven to 'flock,' or behave similarly to others in a given situation.

Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers: Study

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science: Advances.

UA study reveals Arizona EMTs face 39-percent greater risk of suicide

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
UA medical student creates resiliency website for emergency workers and develops partnership with forest firefighters to measure its effectiveness.

UMN researchers discover influenza virus doesn't replicate equally in all cells

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
The seasonal flu is caused by different subtypes of Influenza A virus and typically leads to the death of half a million people each year. In order to better understand this virus and how it spreads, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers took a closer look at the cells inside the lungs. What they discovered is not only is the immune system response tuned to the amount of virus replication, it's also tuned to the viral spread.

From crystals to climate: 'Gold standard' timeline links flood basalts to climate change

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Princeton geologists used tiny zircon crystals found in volcanic ash to rewrite the timeline for the eruptions of the Columbia River flood basalts, a series of massive lava flows that coincided with an ancient global warming period 16 million years ago.

Gaia detects a shake in the Milky Way

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
A team led by researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB, UB-IEEC) and the University of Groningen has found, through the analysis of Gaia data, substructures which were unknown so far in the Milky Way. The findings, which appeared when combining positions and speed of six million stars from our galaxy's disk, have been published in the journal Nature.

How long does a quantum jump take?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Quantum jumps are usually regarded to be instantaneous. However, new measurement methods are so precise that it has now become possible to observe such a process and to measure its duration precisely -- for example the famous 'photoelectric effect', first described by Albert Einstein.

New nanoparticle superstructures made from pyramid-shaped building blocks

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
In research that may help bridge the divide between the nano and the macro, Brown University chemists have used pyramid-shaped nanoparticles to create what might be the most complex macroscale superstructure ever assembled.

Team of researchers determines absolute duration of photoelectric effect for the first time

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
It provides the basis for solar energy and global communications: the photoelectric effect. Albert Einstein described it over a century ago. For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ), and the TU Wien have now measured the absolute duration of the light absorption and of the resulting photoelectron which is released from a solid body.

Sustained levels of moderate warming could melt the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Imperial experts have predicted that sustained Antarctic warming of just 2°C could melt the largest ice sheet on earth.

Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Parts of the world's largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research.University of Queensland scientist Dr Kevin Welsh was part of a team that used evidence from warm periods in Earth's history to see how the East Antarctic Ice Sheet might react to a warming climate.

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
In a paper published in Nature, researchers including University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous work that looked at individual tree species' resilience based on hydraulic traits, lead to new research directions on forest resilience and inform forest managers working to rebuild forests after logging or wildfire.

Zombie cells found in brains of mice prior to cognitive loss

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
Zombie cells are the ones that can't die but are equally unable to perform the functions of a normal cell. These zombie, or senescent, cells are implicated in a number of age-related diseases. And with a new letter in Nature, Mayo Clinic researchers have expanded that list.

Three major cartels exposed for large shipments of illegal ivory

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
By genetically matching elephant tusks from large ivory seizures and comparing this information to details including the ivory's shipping port of export, researchers have exposed the three major exporters illegally smuggling the greatest amount of ivory out of Africa.

Amino acid deficiency connected to new viral disease

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
In their study of hospital patients infected with SFTS (severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome) virus, Xiao-Kun Li and colleagues show that lower levels of the amino acid arginine are associated with low blood platelet count and immune suppression among the patients.

French 2017 presidential election: Social media, fake news, and political communities

EurekAlert! - Mar, 09/18/2018 - 22:00
CNRS and EHESS researchers analyzed nearly 60 million political tweets posted during the 2017 presidential election in France. They noted that fake news flagged by the Le Monde Decodex fact-checking website accounted for only 0.1 percent of all Twitter content, and that 73 percent of the bogus information was spread by two political communities. Their findings are published in PLOS ONE.

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