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KAIST team develops technology to find optimum drug target for cancer

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A KAIST research team led by Professor Kwang-Hyun Cho of the Department of Bio and Brain Engineering developed technology to find the optimum drug target according to the type of cancer cell. The team used systems biology to analyze molecular network dynamics that reflect genetic mutations in cancer cells and to predict drug response. The technology could contribute greatly to future anti-cancer drug development.

Scientists Describe the Structure of a Prospective Luminesce Substance

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A physicist from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and Kirensky Institute of Physics Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS (IF) described the structure and properties of a new substance obtained by his Chinese colleagues. These are layered crystals of rare earth metal hydroxides Ln2(OH)4SO4 (Ln=Eu-Lu, Y) that may acts as eco-friendly sources of phosphors (substances that transform different energies into emission of light) for panels, screens, and other electronic devices. The discovery was reported by Chemistry: A European Journal.

Research points to second chance for rejected antibiotic candidate

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
An antibiotic candidate compound shelved in the 1970s in favour of more worthwhile drugs could be worth a second look, new research has found.

Superradiance of an ensemble of nuclei excited by a free electron laser

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A collaboration of scientists has succeeded in verifying a basic prediction of the quantum-mechanical behavior of resonant systems. In the study published in Nature Physics, they were able to carefully follow, one x-ray at a time, the decay of nuclei in a perfect crystal after excitation with a flash of x-rays. They observed a dramatic reduction of the time taken to emit the first x-ray as the number of x-rays increased.

Arctic sea ice affects and is affected by mid-latitude weather

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
New work by Dr Michael Kelleher and Prof James Screen from the University of Exeter find evidence that sea ice change is both a driver of and a response to atmospheric variability.

Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU).

Columbia engineers develop floating solar fuels rig for seawater electrolysis

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Chemical engineering professor Daniel Esposito has developed a novel photovoltaic-powered electrolysis device that can operate as a stand-alone platform that floats on open water. His floating PV-electrolyzer can be thought of as a 'solar fuels rig' that bears some resemblance to deep-sea oil rigs -- but it would produce hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water instead of extracting petroleum from beneath the sea floor.

Stroke patients receive clot-busting medication more than twice as fast as national rates

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Northern California are delivering clot-busting medication to new stroke patients more than twice as fast as the national average. This follows the regionwide adoption of an integrated telemedicine program, according to new research published Dec. 15 in the journal Stroke.

Complete design of a silicon quantum computer chip unveiled

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Research teams all over the world are exploring different ways to design a working computing chip that can integrate quantum interactions. Now, Australian and Dutch engineers believe they have cracked the problem, reimagining the silicon microprocessors we know to create a complete design for a quantum computer chip that can be manufactured using mostly standard industry processes and components.

Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

Nanoparticles as a solution against antibiotic resistance?

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany succeeded in developing an efficient method to treat mucoviscidosis. Crucial are nanoparticles that transport the antibiotics more efficiently to their destination. First of all, the active particles need to have a certain size to be able to reach the deeper airways and not to bounce off somewhere else before. Ultimately, they have to penetrate the thick layer of mucus on the airways as well as the lower layers of the bacteria biofilm.

New technique could make captured carbon more valuable

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Carbon capture could help coal plants reduce emissions if economic challenges can be overcome. Turning captured carbon into a useable product is one solution. Scientists have developed an efficient process for turning captured carbon dioxide into syngas that can be used to make fuels and chemicals. Results were published Dec. 14 by Green Chemistry. "For the first time it was demonstrated that syngas can be directly produced from captured CO2," the researchers wrote.

Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed?

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity liquids. Kobayashi and Kurita found that concentration fluctuations are enhanced by thermal convection when the two liquids have a large viscosity difference. Such mixtures are ubiquitously observed in nature, daily life, and manufacturing processes, e.g. mantle convection, syrup, polymer products. These results promise further insight into non-equilibrium phenomena in fluid mixtures with contrasting 'thickness.'

Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises baby's heart-defect risk

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the baby's risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Coarse particulate matter may increase asthma risk

EurekAlert! - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 23:00
Children exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

News at a glance

ScienceNOW Daily News Feed - Jue, 12/14/2017 - 12:25

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