Escuelas

Noticias

Yellow fever killing thousands of monkeys in Brazil

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
In a vulnerable forest in southeastern Brazil, where the air was once thick with the guttural chatter of brown howler monkeys, there now exists silence. Yellow fever, a virus carried by mosquitoes and endemic to Africa and South America, has robbed the private, federally-protected reserve of its brown howlers in an unprecedented wave of death that has swept through the region since late 2016, killing thousands of monkeys.

Largest survey to date of patient and family experience at US children's hospitals

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A survey of more than 17,000 parents of hospitalized children, conducted by the Center of Excellence for Pediatric Quality Measurement at Boston Children's Hospital, gives mixed responses about the quality of the inpatient experience at 69 US children's hospitals.

UC biologists find surprising variability in courtship behaviors of wolf spiders

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Studies of wolf spiders at the University of Cincinnati found that courtship displays help preserve genetic isolation between closely related species. Another study found that the species Gladicosa bellamyi used multi-modal communication to entice females.

Too much structured knowledge hurts creativity, shows Rotman study

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Structure organizes human activities and help us understand the world with less effort, but it can be the killer of creativity, concludes a study from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

New low-cost method to produce light-based lab-on-a-chip devices for fast medical tests

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new fabrication process could make it easier and less expensive to incorporate optical sensing onto lab-on-a-chip devices. These devices integrate laboratory functions onto a plastic or glass 'chip' typically no more than a few square centimeters in size, allowing automated testing in the doctor's office or various types of chemical or biological analysis with portable instruments.

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early universe

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early universe, a University of California, Riverside-led study has found. That molecule is called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. On Earth it is also found in coal and tar. In space, it is a component of dust.

Penn researchers call for better laws covering patient incentives to improve care

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Current federal anti-kickback laws prohibit pharmaceutical companies and providers from bribing patients to seek their goods and services. Unfortunately, the laws also prevent hospitals from offering services that could potentially benefit patients, such as free rides to elderly or disabled patients to help them get to their appointments. In an essay published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers call for a recrafting of these laws to permit more sensible health-promoting initiatives.

WPI team grows heart tissue on spinach leaves

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers face a fundamental challenge as they seek to scale up human tissue regeneration from small lab samples to full-size tissues and organs: how to establish a vascular system that delivers blood deep into the developing tissue. Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Arkansas State University-Jonesboro have successfully turned to plants, culturing beating human heart cells on spinach leaves that were stripped of plant cells.

Endocrine Society experts issue Clinical Practice Guideline on hypothalamic amenorrhea

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Female athletes and women who have eating disorders are prone to developing a condition called hypothalamic amenorrhea that causes them to stop menstruating. The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on ways to diagnose and treat this condition.

Scientists discover urinary biomarker that may help track ALS

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A study in Neurology suggests that analyzing levels of the protein p75ECD in urine samples from people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may help monitor disease progression as well as determine the effectiveness of therapies. The study was supported by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

UC researchers help map future of precision medicine in Parkinson's disease

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Two landmark publications with co-authors from the University of Cincinnati Gardner Neuroscience Institute outline a transformative approach to defining, studying and treating Parkinson's disease. Rather than approaching Parkinson's disease as a single entity, the international cadre of researchers advocates targeting therapies to distinct 'nodes or clusters' of patients based on specific symptoms or molecular features of their disease.

Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Words and experience matter to surrogates making end-of-life decisions.

Epigenetic alteration a promising new drug target for heroin use disorder

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Heroin use is associated with excessive histone acetylation, an epigenetic process that regulates gene expression, and more years of drug use correlate with higher levels of hyperacetylation, according to research conducted at The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Weight-bearing exercises promote bone formation in men

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Osteoporosis affects more than 200 million people worldwide and is a serious public health concern, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. Now, Pamela Hinton, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, has published the first study in men to show that long-term, weight-bearing exercises decrease sclerostin, a protein made in the bone, and increase IGF-1, a hormone associated with bone growth. These changes promote bone formation, increasing bone density.

Under the dead sea, warnings of dire drought

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Nearly 1,000 feet below the bed of the Dead Sea, scientists have found evidence that during past warm periods, the Mideast has suffered drought on scales never recorded by humans -- a possible warning for current times. Thick layers of crystalline salt show that rainfall plummeted to as little as a fifth of modern levels some 120,000 years ago, and again about 10,000 years ago.

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have developed a technique that uses light to get flat, plastic sheets to curve into spheres, tubes or bowls.

Charitable giving: How do power and beliefs about equality impact donations?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Are powerful, well-to-do people more charitable? It depends. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, wealthier people are more likely to donate to charity if they endorse social inequality while less wealthy people are more likely to make donations if they endorse greater equality.

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979.

Feeling out of control: Do consumers make practical purchases or luxury buys?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The common assumption about retail therapy is that it's all about indulging in things like pricey designer duds or the latest gadgets. But according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are actually more likely to make practical purchases than splurge on luxury items when they feel less in control.

Machine learning lets scientists reverse-engineer cellular control networks

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from Tufts University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County used machine learning on the Stampede supercomputer to model the cellular control network that determines how tadpoles develop. Using that model, they reverse-engineered a drug intervention that created tadpoles with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. They plan to use the method for cancer therapies and regenerative medicine.

Páginas

Subscribe to Facultad de Ciencias agregador