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Pitt professor models system using baking soda filled capsules to capture CO2 emissions

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Coal and natural gas represent the majority of the US energy supply. Even with pollution controls, burning these fossil fuels for energy releases a tremendous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Research led by the University of Pittsburgh and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses microcapsule technology that may make post-combustion carbon capture cheaper, safer, and more efficient.

Scientists pave the way for saliva test for Alzheimer's disease

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
University of Alberta scientists have identified three biomarkers for detecting mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease in saliva samples. The research has promising results for application in a clinical setting.

Gut hormone increases response to food

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

Hearing loss is a risk factor for premature death

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A new study links hearing loss with an increased risk for mortality before the age of 75 due to cardiovascular disease. Researchers found that mortality among those with hearing loss is elevated, particularly among men and women younger than age 75 and those who are divorced or separated. However, mortality risk was diminished in adults with a well-hearing partner. This is the first study to investigate the combined effects of hearing loss with partnership, parental status, and increased mortality risk.

Exercise following weight loss may reduce colorectal cancer risk, study finds

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
New research suggests that exercise is a key factor in reducing colorectal cancer risk after weight loss. According to the study, physical activity causes beneficial changes in the bone marrow. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Endocrinology and Metabolism.

New mouse model may speed identification of promising muscular dystrophy therapies

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has created a new mouse model of a common form of muscular dystrophy with the potential of rapidly distinguishing promising therapeutic drugs from those unlikely to be successful.

Study evaluates efficacy and safety of pancreatic cancer treatment

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
In a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Manuel Hidalgo, MD, PhD, and colleagues conducted a phase I/II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nab-paclitaxel given in combination with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer and reduced health status.

Johns Hopkins researchers examine testosterone use to increase BMD in HIV-infected men

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A new study has shown that HIV-infected men had lower median bone mineral density (BMD) scores at the hip compared to HIV-uninfected men, and all men who received testosterone had significantly greater BMD scores at the lumbar spine.

UC researchers find chronic rhinitis influences hospital readmissions for asthma and COPD patients

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Patients hospitalized for either asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a higher risk of being readmitted for a hospital stay within 30 days of release if they also suffer from chronic rhinitis, according to a trio of researchers at the University of Cincinnati.

Pesticide exposure raises risk for cardiovascular disease among Latino workers

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Latinos who are exposed to pesticides in their workplaces are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease compared with Latinos who are not exposed to pesticides at work, according to a new study published in the journal Heart.

Rethinking school suspensions: School climate offers a clue

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Virginia have found that when educators and administrators focus on creating a positive school climate, the likelihood of a student being suspended decreases by approximately 10 percent.

Low-cost catalyst from U of T Engineering boosts hydrogen production from water

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A future powered by carbon-free fuel depends on our ability to harness and store energy from renewable but intermittent sources, such as solar and wind. Now, a new catalyst developed at U of T Engineering gives a boost to a number of clean energy technologies that depend on producing hydrogen from water.

High-dose antipsychotics place children at increased risk of unexpected death

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Children and young adults without psychosis who are prescribed high-dose antipsychotic medications are at increased risk of unexpected death, despite the availability of other medications to treat their conditions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Psychiatry.

Coral larvae use sound to find a home on the reef

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is starting to unravel that mystery. Researchers found that the soundscape of a reef--the combined sounds of all animals living nearby--might play a major role in steering corals towards healthy reef systems and away from damaged ones.

#BlackGirlMagic: Black women in STEM are driving forward -- educators need to catch up

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
The need for more scientists and engineers is a persistent issue plaguing industries throughout the United States. Several initiatives created to prioritize science, technology, engineering and mathematics in schools are helping educators prepare more diverse students and workers for STEM fields. However, these efforts might be falling short when it comes to representation of people of color, according to a University of Missouri researcher.

3D printing offers helping hand to patients with arthritis

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
3D printing can cut the cost of adaptive aids that help people with hand arthritis. Current products are quite expensive, and more so to create customized versions, but 3D printing drops the cost by an average of 94 percent for 20 different handheld devices.

Researchers create first sensor package that can ride aboard bees

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. But these machines need so much power to fly that they can't get very far without needing a charge. Now, engineers at the University of Washington have created a sensing system that is small enough to ride aboard a bumblebee.

RUDN medics called the world to action against hepatitis in Somalia

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Using mathematical statistics methods, RUDN medics analyzed the data of 30 studies of the cases of hepatitis in Somalia. The studies also included Somali people who immigrated to Italy, the United States, United Kingdom and Libya and were screened for hepatitis viruses The research demonstrated critical spread rates of 5 types of viral hepatitis. The authors emphasize that, according to the results, immediate action should be taken by the international community. The results of the study were published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in brain independently of one another

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Pain is a negative feeling that we want to get rid of. In order to protect our bodies, we react for example by withdrawing the hand. This action is usually understood as the consequence of the perception of pain. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich has shown that perception, the impulse to act and provision of energy to do so take place in the brain simultaneously and not, as expected, one after the other.

Study highlights potential benefits of continuous EEG monitoring for infant patients

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A recent retrospective study evaluating continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) of children in intensive care units found a higher than anticipated number of seizures. The work also identified several conditions closely associated with the seizures, and suggests that cEEG monitoring may be a valuable tool for helping to identify and treat neurological problems in patients who are 14 months old or younger.

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