Escuelas

Noticias

Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung disease

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Reviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD).

Toothpaste and hand wash are causing antibiotic resistance

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
A common ingredient in toothpaste and hand wash could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, according to University of Queensland research.A study led by Dr Jianhua Guo from UQ's Advanced Water Management Centre focused on triclosan, a compound used in more than 2000 personal care products.

Mayo Clinic discovers gene mutations linked to pancreatic cancer

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Six genes contain mutations that may be passed down in families, substantially increasing a person's risk for pancreatic cancer. That's according to Mayo Clinic research published in the June 19 edition of the JAMA. However, because researchers found these genetic mutations in patients with no family history of pancreatic cancer, they are recommending genetic testing for all pancreatic cancer patients as the new standard of care.

Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdose

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
A National Institutes of Health-funded study found that treatment of opioid use disorder with either methadone or buprenorphine following a nonfatal opioid overdose is associated with significant reductions in opioid related mortality. The research, published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, was co-funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, both parts of NIH.

Monash research provides insights into why older people respond poorly to cancer treatment

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers may have found a group of immune cells that increase in number with age but are too worn out to fight diseases. The accumulation of dysfunctional virtual memory T cells, in addition to the loss of true naïve T cells, may explain why older people have reduced immune responses to cancer and vaccines, why cancer immunotherapy is less successful in the elderly, and may help to tailor cancer immunotherapy treatments specifically for older patients.

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteries

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
UBC researchers have developed a type of 'smart stent' that monitors even subtle changes in the flow of blood through the artery, detecting the narrowing in its earliest stages and making early diagnosis and treatment possible.

Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistance

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
FAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain that produced metabolites that are more potent than the bacterial antibiotic, vancomycin, against C. difficile.

Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle intervention

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Four of the most common bad habits -- too much screen time, too little exercise and high fat and low fruit and vegetable intake -- can lead to heart disease and cancer, but a simple intervention using mobile health tools and coaching normalized these behaviors, and improvements were sustained.

Good primary lowers ED use for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
One in three adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) visit the emergency department annually but effective primary care could reduce these numbers, suggests a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).

Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storage

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.

Article examines guideline for glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
A JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis article examines the American College of Physicians' (ACP's) 2018 guidance statement on HbA1c goals in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes, including the possible effect of a recommended HbA1c level between 7 percent and 8 percent for most patients with type 2 diabetes, a range that is higher than other guidelines.

Having stress-related disorder associated with increased risk of developing autoimmune disease

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Stress-related disorders brought on by traumatic or stressful life events were associated with increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease.

Studies examine differences in demographics, urban vs. rural rates of obesity in US

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Two studies used national survey data to examine differences in rates of obesity and severe obesity among children, teens and adults based on demographic factors (including sex, age, race, education) and whether people lived in urban or rural areas of the United States.

Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

WSU researchers see human immune response in the fruit fly

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Washington State University researchers have seen how both humans and fruit flies deploy a protein that a plays a critical role in their immune responses to invading bacteria. The discovery gives scientists evolutionary insight and a model organism with which to explore ways to boost the human immune system and create infection-fighting medicines.

Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggests

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.

Warnings to texting pedestrians may not eliminate risks, but they can help

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Improving pedestrian safety even in the presence of warnings remains a challenge.

Blood signature could improve early TB diagnosis

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
A gene signature in the bloodstream can reveal whether someone is going to develop active tuberculosis (TB) disease months before symptoms begin. This offers the prospect of intervening before individuals pose a risk of transmitting the infection to others.

Palm oil: The carbon cost of deforestation

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Palm oil has become part of our daily lives, but a recent study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) serves as a reminder that intensive farming of this crop has a major impact on the environment. Both short- and long-term solutions exist, however. The article, which was published on June 19 in Nature Communications, analyzed the carbon costs and benefits of converting rainforests into oil palm plantations.

Ground-breaking discoveries could create superior alloys with many applications

EurekAlert! - Lun, 06/18/2018 - 22:00
Many current and future technologies require alloys that can withstand high temperatures without corroding. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have hailed a major breakthrough in understanding how alloys behave at high temperatures, pointing the way to significant improvements in many technologies. The results are published in the highly ranked journal Nature Materials.

Páginas

Subscribe to Facultad de Ciencias agregador