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Development of world's first vertical Ga2O3 transistor through ion implantation doping

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) demonstrate a vertical Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) that adopts an all-ion-implanted process for both n-type and p-type doping, paving the way for new generations of low-cost and highly-manufacturable Ga2O3 power electronic devices.

New foldable drone flies through narrow holes in rescue missions

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Fighting obesity -- could it be as plain as dirt?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
It costs the global economy an estimated US $2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research from the University of South Australia has unearthed a possible cure for obesity -- and it is as plain as dirt!

Putting a price on reputation

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
As Christmas shopping gets into full swing, new research reveals how reputation influences our purchasing decisions and the price we are willing to pay relative to other product features.

Deep-learning technique reveals 'invisible' objects in the dark

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Deep-learning technique reveals transparent objects in the dark.

Eligibility criteria unfairly limit minorities' access to hip and knee replacement surgeries

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
In a study of medical records pulled from a national database, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that underrepresented populations are less likely than others to be eligible for hip or knee replacement surgeries

The stiffest porous lightweight materials ever

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers at ETH have developed and manufactured a family of architectures that maximises the stiffness of porous lightweight materials. It's practically impossible to develop stiffer designs.

WSU researchers reverse engineer way pine trees produce green chemicals worth billions

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Washington State University researchers have reverse engineered the way a pine tree produces a resin, which could serve as an environmentally friendly alternative to a range of fossil-fuel based products worth billions of dollars.

Killing the liver-stage malaria parasite with baculovirus: a drug discovery approach

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Currently, few antimalarial treatments exist that effectively kill liver-stage malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax, which can lay dormant for months or even years. Researchers at Kanazawa University have reported a new drug that could eliminate liver-stage malaria parasites completely. Using an insect virus, known as a baculovirus, the researchers investigated the ability of baculovirus to mediate innate immunity against malaria infection. This work could pave the way for developing new and more effective antimalarial treatments.

Light-induced modification of a carboxylic acid with an aminocyclopropenone

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in The Journal of Organic Chemistry that carboxylic acids, functional groups contained in biomolecules, drugs, and materials can be readily modified by light-induced organic reactions using an aminocyclopropenone. This discovery opens up new pathways for carboxylic acid modification with potential applications including determination of drug target proteins, elucidation of protein function, and synthesis of functionalized polymer materials.

Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
A study by the University of Washington and Temple University examines what happens in children's brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks.

IIT researchers show how plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
An interdisciplinary team of researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia in Pontedera (Pisa, Italy), discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs. Researchers also showed that an 'hybrid tree' made of natural and artificial leaves can act as an innovative 'green' electrical generator converting wind into electricity.

Declining snowpack over western US mapped at a finer scale

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers mapped the changes in snow mass from 1982 to 2016 onto a grid of squares 2.5-miles on a side over the entire contiguous U.S. Grid size for previous studies was about 40 miles on a side. Since 1982, some parts of the West have a 41 percent reduction in the yearly maximum mass of snow. The research is scheduled for publication in Geophysical Research Letters on December 12.

'Eavesdropping' on groupers' mating calls key to survival

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Many fish produce sounds for courtship and mating, navigation, and defending their territories. Scientists analyze these sounds to study their behavior such as reproduction. Since grouper spawning is brief and it takes them a long time to reach sexual maturity, they are vulnerable to overfishing. 'Eavesdropping' on them is key to their survival. Researchers have developed a novel acoustic monitoring technique to classify grouper species by their sounds or 'grouper calls,' with accuracy of about 90 percent.

Your weight history may predict your heart failure risk

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
In a medical records analysis of information gathered on more than 6,000 people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that simply asking older adult patients about their weight history at ages 20 and 40 could provide real value to clinicians in their efforts to predict patients' future risk of heart failure, heart attacks or strokes.

Developing brains of premature babies benefit from caffeine therapy

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
New research by the University of Calgary's Dr. Abhay Lodha, MD, shows early caffeine treatment of premature babies born less than 29 weeks' gestation has no long-term negative effects on brain development.

Buzz! Slap! Ow! Taking the virus out of a mosquito's bite

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
They approach with the telltale sign -- a high-pitched whine. It's a warning that you are a mosquito's next meal. But that mosquito might carry a virus, and now the virus is in you. Now, with the help of state-of-the-art technology, researchers at the University of Missouri can see how a virus moves within a mosquito's body, which could lead to the prevention of mosquitoes transmitting diseases.

Research unlocks secrets of iron storage in algae

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
New research shows that phytoplankton iron storage strategies may determine which species thrive in changing oceans and impact marine food webs, according to a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research examined two primary methods of iron storage and found that one makes species more resilient against shortages of the rare and essential element.

Students around the globe collect quality, eye-opening research data on mammals

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and NC State University, running a large-scale camera-trap study called eMammal, recently enlisted the help of K-12 students from 28 schools and four countries -- the United States, India, Mexico and Kenya. What the researchers, and the kids, discovered was surprising. 'These camera traps yielded thousands of images with a total 83 native mammal species, including 12 that were threatened or endangered,' says lead author Stephanie Schuttler.

Researchers developing nonopioid drug for chronic pain

EurekAlert! - Mar, 12/11/2018 - 23:00
Researchers from the Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience are teaming with the University of California San Diego and the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop a drug -- now in its earliest stages -- that can treat certain types of chronic pain without the addictive consequences of opioids.

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