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Study affirms premature infants in NICUs do better with light touch

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When premature infants were given more 'supportive touch' experiences, including skin-to-skin care and breastfeeding, their brains responded more strongly to light touch, according to an international research team from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Monroe Carell's Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee, and Lausanne University in Switzerland.

Income should be the dominant factor for reforming health care says the American public

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study on reforming US healthcare showed that Americans believe a health insurance policy should be about 5 percent of household income to be affordable. They also feel that younger people could pay somewhat more for health insurance and that healthier people could afford to pay more than those in poor health. The current health reform proposal forwarded by speaker Paul Ryan offers a fixed tax credit rather than one based upon household income.

UF Health diabetes researchers discover way to expand potent regulatory cells

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
For parents, storing their newborn baby's umbilical cord blood is a way to preserve potentially lifesaving cells. Now, a group of University of Florida Health researchers has found a way to expand and preserve certain cord-blood cells as a potential treatment for type 1 diabetes.

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the US have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores efforts to change this practice.

Minitablets help medicate picky cats

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Of all pets, cats are often considered the most difficult ones to medicate. Very small minitablets with flavors or flavor coatings can help cat owners commit to the treatment and make cats more compliant to it, while making it easier to regulate dosage and administer medication flexibly.

Sea urchin spines could fix bones

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. They report their degradable bone scaffold, which they tested in animals, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

The Cerberus Groundsnake is a Critically Endangered new species from Ecuador

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
The snake fauna of Central and South America seems largely under-researched, since as many as thirty-three species of a single genus have been discovered in the last ten years only. Recently, a team of scientists have studied the hereditary molecular differences in this genus and described three new colubrid species in the open access journal ZooKeys. Among the new reptiles, there is a species which is to be known under the common name Cerberus Groundsnake.

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips (video)

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable 'lab-on-a-glove.' The report on the glove appears in the journal ACS Sensors.

After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Today, an article published in Cancer Discovery by Manel Esteller explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome.

How do metals interact with DNA?

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.

When green means stop

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Optogenetics has revolutionized how researchers investigate cellular behavior and the function of large and interconnected tissues such as the brain. This successful combination of optics and genetics is powered by light-sensitive proteins, many of which have been engineered to bind to each other upon light stimulation. Scientists at IST Austria now expanded the optogenetic protein toolbox. They engineered a receptor that releases binding in green light. This avoids bleaching and toxic side effects of light.

Caught on camera -- chemical reactions 'filmed' at the single-molecule level

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have succeeded in 'filming' inter-molecular chemical reactions -- using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope as a stop-frame imaging tool. They have also discovered that the electron beam can be simultaneously tuned to stimulate specific chemical reactions by using it as a source of energy as well as an imaging tool.

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Egyptologists at the University of Bonn discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture.

Major new issue of CVIA on imaging

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) journal has just published a special issue on Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging with Guest Editor Dr. Christopher Kramer of University of Virginia.

Salmon with side effects

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists warning that dissolved organic compounds are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities.

Pollination mystery unlocked by Stirling bee researchers

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Bees latch on to similarly-sized nectarless flowers to unpick pollen -- like keys fitting into locks, University of Stirling scientists have discovered.

Scientific discovery may change treatment of Parkinsons

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When monitoring Parkinson's disease, SPECT imaging of the brain is used for acquiring information on the dopamine activity. A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, shows that the dopamine activity observed in SPECT imaging does not reflect the number of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, as previously assumed.

Alzheimer's disease linked to the metabolism of unsaturated fats, new research finds

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study published in PLOS Medicine's Special Issue on Dementia has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Visualizing nuclear radiation

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation.

Quadruped robot exhibits spontaneous changes in step with speed

EurekAlert! - Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A research group has demonstrated that by changing only its parameter related to speed, a quadruped robot can spontaneously change its steps.

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