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Eucalyptus 2018: Plantation managers and researchers are working to deal with climate change

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Commercial eucalyptus plantations cover some 20 million hectares in a hundred or so countries, and primarily serve to produce paper, while smallholder plantings produce firewood*. However, they are now suffering the effects of climate change. Some 225 scientists and managers from around thirty countries are meeting in Montpellier from 17 to 21 September to discuss ways of adapting plantations.

Better chemo drug adsorption onto targeted delivery capsules

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
One of the challenges in cancer research is improving the delivery of chemo drugs to enhance their efficacy while decreasing the risk of side effects. In a new study published in EPJ E, Scientists from Argentina perform a theoretical prediction of adsorption of a well-known chemo drug onto active carbon with aluminium inclusions, to show its potential as an oral chemotherapy delivery capsule.

Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inbox

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
New Michigan State University research shows that bosses struggle, like the rest of us, to keep up with email demands. What makes managers unique is that email traffic prevents them from being effective leaders and threatens employee performance.

Researchers confirm glyphosate resistance in junglerice

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. But pigweed isn't the only weed resistant to glyphosate. New research published in the journal Weed Science shows certain populations of junglerice (Echinochloa colona) are now among a growing number of weeds resistant to the herbicide.

Introducing the 'smart mirror'

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been developing a laser power sensor that could be built into manufacturing devices for real-time measurements in many manufacturing processes, from welding car parts to crafting engine components with 3D printers.

Racial/ethnic discrimination associated with lower well-being among adolescents

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Racial and ethnic discrimination takes a toll on adolescents and is linked to their depression, poor self-esteem, lower academic achievement, substance use and risky sexual behavior, according to a meta-analysis published in the American Psychological Association's flagship journal, American Psychologist.

Nuclear pasta, the hardest known substance in the universe

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
A team of scientists has calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found it to be the strongest known material in the universe.

Study links natural climate oscillations in north Atlantic to Greenland ice sheet melt

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have known for years that warming global climate is melting the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest ice sheet in the world. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, shows that the rate of melting might be temporarily increased or decreased by two existing climate patterns: the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

Digital games show potential to improve cardiovascular disease-related exercise outcomes

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
A scoping review of studies on game interventions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) self-management found that the use of digital games improved exercise capacity and energy expenditure significantly.

A key to climate stabilization could be buried deep in the mud, FSU researchers suggest

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
While scientists fear that rising temperatures could unleash a 'bomb' of carbon from Earth's soil carbon reservoirs, a new FSU study suggests these reservoirs might actually be more stable than predicted.

RUDN agriculturists suggested an optimal strategy for growing wheat in northern Eurasia

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
RUDN and the Italian Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change (CMCC) scientists studied how climate changes may affect wheat harvest in high latitudes of the Eastern hemisphere on the example of Russia. In the upcoming decades the most yielding agricultural areas in the south of the country will be hit by droughts. The optimal territory for wheat and other grain crops cultivation would move north-east. The study was published in the Land Use Policy journal.

Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Insect pollinators and plants that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has found.

Increased the performance and lifetime of lithium batteries in renewable energy facilities

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Variations in power generation using renewable sources lead to control problems in the electricity grid. The technology of lithium batteries is a candidate offering great potential in solving these problems. An industrial engineer at the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA) has developed a new management system that allows good performance of these batteries to be achieved and their lifetime to be preserved when connected to a renewable facility to store the electrical energy produced.

New study shows Florida Keys' corals are growing but have become more porous

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Researchers have long questioned what impact climate change has on the rate at which corals are growing and building reef habitats in the Florida Keys. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explored this topic, finding both good and bad news. The rate of coral skeletal growth in the Florida Keys has remained relatively stable over time, but the skeletal density of the region's corals is declining, possibly due to ocean acidification.

Colon cancer is caused by bacteria and cell stress

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
The team of Professor Dirk Haller at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) made an unexpected discovery while investigating the triggering factors of colon cancer: Cell stress in combination with an altered microbiota in the colon drives tumour growth. Previously, it was assumed that this combination only contributes to inflammatory intestinal diseases.

Silver nanoparticles are toxic for aquatic organisms

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms. The UPV/EHU's 'Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology' research group has analysed adult zebrafish to find out the effects that in the long term can be caused by these silver particles present in fresh water.

Jumping genes work together to control programmed deletion in the genome

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Scientists have discovered a new family of molecules that work together to precisely remove unwanted DNA during reproduction in single-celled, freshwater organisms called ciliates.

Failure rate in some surgical mesh treatments unacceptably high - Biomedical review

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Failure rates in some surgical mesh products used to treat prolapse injury are unacceptably high according to a new biomedical review conducted by a medical materials expert, who also believes patients should have received more information around the risk before being treated for urinary incontinence with surgical mesh products.

Intestinal bacteria produce electric current from sugar

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Intestinal bacteria can create an electric current, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The results are valuable for the development of drugs, but also for the production of bioenergy, for example.

Global trade in exotic pets threatens endangered parrots through the spread of a virus

EurekAlert! - Lun, 09/17/2018 - 22:00
Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in wild parrot populations has been detected in eight new countries, raising concerns for threatened species. This highlights the need for greater awareness of the risks of the spread of infectious disease associated with the international trade in live parrots.

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