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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Flexible warped nanographene developed for bioimaging

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
An international team of scientists has developed a water-soluble 'warped nanographene', a flexible molecule that is biocompatible and shows promise for fluorescent cell imaging. The new nanographene molecule also induces cell death when exposed to blue laser light. Further investigation is required to determine how nanocarbons could be used for a range of biological applications, such as photodynamic therapy for cancer treatments.

Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detected

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
An international team of astronomers led by the University of Southampton has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected -- a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.

The effect of the GDNF on the activity of neural networks during hypoxic damage has been studied

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Searching for ways to reduce losses from ischemic stroke, a major problem worldwide, is an extremely important task for many areas of public health and economy. So far, no effective and safe methods have been developed for treating ischemic brain damage.One of the most promising approaches to the development of treatment methods is to use endogenous molecules.

Mobile health applications put the personal data of millions of users at risk

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
This is the finding of a European study started in 2016 and involving Agustí Solanas, head of the Smart Health research group at the URV's Department of Computer Engineering and Mathematics, and researchers from the University of Piraeus (Greece) headed by Constantinos Patsakis.

Spatial perception of odorants in cockroaches

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
A recent study involving researchers from the University of Konstanz has described the first neural architecture capable of encoding the spatial location of odorants.

Physical exercise reduces risk of developing diabetes -- study

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Exercising more reduces the risk of diabetes and could see seven million fewer diabetic patients across mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, according to new research.

The starry sky shows nocturnal animals the way

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Nocturnal animals can use the stars and the Milky Way to find their way during the darkest hours. While animal navigation is studied all over the world, some of the leading researchers are based at Lund University in Sweden. In a recent article they sum up the research so far and give their thoughts on challenges to come.

Team identify genetic targets for autism spectrum disorder

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Early detection of autism in children is key to producing the best outcomes; however, searching for the genetic causes of autism is complicated by various symptoms found within the spectrum. Now, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Missouri created a new computational method that has connected several target genes to autism. Discoveries could lead to screening tools for young children and could help doctors determine correct interventions when diagnosing autism.

Laboratory study shows that father's age can affect offspring lifespan

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
How does the father's age at conception affect his children? DZNE researchers have studied this question in mice. Their findings show that the offspring of elderly mouse-fathers had a shorter lifespan than those of young fathers and featured an exacerbation of a number of histopathological and molecular aging traits. Moreover, sperm of old males as well as the tissue from old father offspring featured shared epigenetic changes and altered activation states of longevity-related signaling pathways.

Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds -- just a myth?

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters -- however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.

Social media to blame for poor grades?

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Do teenagers who frequent Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites perform worse academically? Scientists from Germany have looked into these worries.

Cellular recycling caught in the act

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Scientists at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have observed a normal physiological process, called 'self-eating', that cells use to recycle their components. They developed an accurate technique that visualizes how mitochondria, cells' energy factories, are fused with lysosomes, cells' recycling machines, in order to get material destroyed and recycled.

Moderate and severe exacerbations accelerate physical activity decline in COPD patients

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
A study published in the European Respiratory Journal has shown that both moderate and severe exacerbations in COPD patients are associated with a decline in their physical activity level. Researchers observed tha the acute drop in physical activity during a COPD exacerbation has an important and lasting effect.

How the insulin receptor works

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München at the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of TU Dresden together with colleagues from Rockefeller University New York succeeded for the first time in the visualization of the insulin receptor activation. The results of this collaborative work have now been published in the 'Journal of Cell Biology'.

'Brain on a chip' reveals how the brain folds

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Our brains are already wrinkled like walnuts by the time we are born. Babies born without these wrinkles - smooth brain syndrome - suffer from severe developmental deficiencies and their life expectancy is markedly reduced. The gene that causes this syndrome recently helped Weizmann Institute of Science researchers to probe the physical forces that cause the brain's wrinkles to form.

New algorithm can pinpoint mutations in large sections of the human gen

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
A team of scientists has developed an algorithm that can accurately pinpoint, in large regions of the human genome, mutations favored by natural selection. The finding provides deeper insight into how evolution works, and ultimately could lead to better treatments for genetic disorders. For example, adaptation to chronic hypoxia at high altitude can suggest targets for cardiovascular and other ischemic diseases.

Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a "fake news tycoon". A pilot study has shown some early success in building resistance to fake news among teenagers.

Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older men

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Grey's Anatomy TV drama may be distorting public expectations of trauma care

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
The television drama, Grey's Anatomy, may be giving viewers a false impression of the realities of trauma care, including the speed at which patients recover after sustaining serious injuries, finds research published in the online journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.

2016 junior doctor strikes in England had 'significant impact' on healthcare provision

Dom, 02/18/2018 - 23:00
The 2016 junior doctors strikes in England had a 'significant' impact on the provision of healthcare, with thousands of appointments cancelled, and significantly fewer admissions and A&E attendances than expected, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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