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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Helicopter parenting may negatively affect children's emotional well-being, behavior

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
It's natural for parents to do whatever they can to keep their children safe and healthy, but children need space to learn and grow on their own, without Mom or Dad hovering over them, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. The study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology, found that overcontrolling parenting can negatively affect a child's ability to manage his or her emotions and behavior.

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteria

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge.

Devastating plant virus is revealed in atomic detail

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
The complex 3D structure of one of the world's most lethal families of plant viruses has been revealed in unprecedented detail by scientists at the University of Leeds.

Genomics offers new treatment options for infants with range of soft tissue tumors

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
The genetic causes of a group of related infant cancers have been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Wuerzburg and their collaborators. Whole genome sequencing of tumours revealed mutations which are targetable by existing drugs used to treat lung cancer and melanoma. The results have implications for clinical practice and the diagnosis of rare cancers in infants, and could lead to new, targeted treatment options for these children.

Constructing new tissue shapes with light

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Constructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18.

Studying heart disease after death can help the living

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Autopsy findings provide valuable information about causes and natural history of overall cardiovascular disease. Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis.

Gene editing technology may improve accuracy of predicting individuals' heart disease risk

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Gene-editing technology may help scientists discern whether genetic variations with undetermined effects are harmless or dangerous. Researchers used the technology to assess a genetic variant suspected to have a role in enlarged hearts. Gene editing may help assess a person's individual disease risk and improve the quality and predictive abilities of precision medicine.

Intravenous acetaminophen has limited benefit for colectomy patients, Mount Sinai study finds

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Results do not support routine use of this expensive drug.

Silence is golden when it comes to how our brains work

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
It's the comparative silence between the firing spikes of neurons that tells what they are really up to, scientists report.

Study finds a pesticide-free way to combat mosquitos and West Nile

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Researchers at the University of Waterloo may have discovered a new, pesticide-free way to limit mosquito populations in some area and reduce the spread of the West Nile virus.

Explosive volcanoes spawned mysterious Martian rock formation

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Explosive volcanic eruptions that shot jets of hot ash, rock and gas skyward are the likely source of a mysterious Martian rock formation, a new study finds. The new finding could add to scientists' understanding of Mars's interior and its past potential for habitability, according to the study's authors.

Childhood sibling dynamics may predict differences in college education

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
The effects of sibling relationships may go beyond childhood bickering and bonding, according to Penn State researchers who found that these relationships may predict similarities and differences in siblings' education later in life.

Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adults

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
In a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced). Of concern, they were also more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors and over-concern about weight.

Americans view child abuse and neglect as a serious public health problem

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
A strong majority of Americans view child abuse and neglect as a public health problem in the United States, a sentiment shared across populations with 81 percent of Hispanics, 76 percent of non-Hispanic whites, 74 percent of African-Americans and 67 percent of Asians in agreement, according to a new survey commissioned by Research!America and the National Foundation to End Child Abuse and Neglect (EndCAN).

Rising sea temperatures threaten survival of juvenile albatross

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Changes in sea surface temperature affect the survival of albatross during their first year at sea, resulting in a reduced population growth rate when temperatures are warmer than the current average, a new study published in the Journal of Animal Ecology has revealed.

Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes.

When it comes to weight loss in overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis, more is better

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
Researchers previously showed that overweight and obese individuals with knee osteoarthritis can reduce pain by 50 percent and significantly improve function and mobility with a 10 percent or more weight loss over an 18-month period.

Researchers find a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosis

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
In a study in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators report that treatment with aleglitazar, a dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha/gamma (PPARα/γ) agonist, reduced inflammation, vasoconstriction, angiogenesis, mucosal disruption, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α overproduction in cirrhotic rats with PH. This suggests a promising new approach for treating liver cirrhosis.

One in 5 parents did not talk to kids about what to do if they got lost at an amusement park

Dom, 06/17/2018 - 22:00
New report indicates several opportunities to reduce safety risks for children in the amusement park environment.

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