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Synthetic peptides enhance antibiotic attack of skin infections in mice

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Short, synthetic peptides that disrupt bacteria's response to antibiotics boost antibiotic activity against high-density skin infections in mice, according to new research presented by Daniel Pletzer and colleagues at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

California Aedes mosquitoes capable of spreading Zika

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Over the last five years, Zika virus has emerged as a significant global human health threat following outbreaks in South and Central America. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have shown that invasive mosquitoes in California -- where cases of Zika in travelers have been a regular occurrence in recent years -- are capable of transmitting Zika.

Ancient Treponema pallidum from human remains sheds light on its evolutionary history

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
The evolutionary history and origin of syphilis, and other treponemal diseases, is a hotly debated topic by scholars. Scholars who theorize syphilis originated in the 'New World' and preceded the 15th century have been in fierce debate with scholars who theorize a multiregional origin followed by the 15th century pandemic spread. Both sides are supported by organic evidence found in contemporary genetic and skeletal remains across the globe.

Scripps Research study provides new clues to improving chemotherapies

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
The work has important implications for understanding how human cancer cells develop resistance to natural product-based chemotherapies.

'Flamingo:' High-powered microscopy coming to a scientist near you

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
The Morgridge Institute for Research has developed a portable, shareable light sheet microscope. The project can be mailed to a lab anywhere in the world, configured remotely by Morgridge engineers, and run one to three months of experiments.

Higher body fat linked to lower breast cancer risk in younger women

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
An analysis co-led led by a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher linked higher body mass index, or BMI, to lower breast cancer risk for younger women, even for women within a normal weight range.

Researchers solve major challenge in mass production of low-cost solar cells

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A team led by led by André D. Taylor of NYU Tandon School of Engineering and Yifan Zheng of Peking University solved a major fabrication challenge for perovskite cells -- the intriguing potential challengers to silicon-based solar cells. In a cover article in the June 28, 2018 issue of Nanoscale, a publication of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the team reveals a new scalable means of applying the compound PCBM, a critical component, to perovskite cells.

Two new species and important taxonomic insights featured in PhytoKeys issue 100

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Eight years, more than 500 articles and no less than 13 000 pages since its launch, Pensoft's flagship botanical title Phytokeys, celebrates its 100th issue. In its anniversary issue the journal features two new species and taxonomic revisions on families Brassicaceae, Zamiaceae and Menispermaceae.

Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patterns

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green.

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record time

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. In a paper that appears online today in The Astronomical Journal, the scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the star HD 73344, which would be the brightest planet host ever discovered by the K2 mission.

Army study quantifies changes in stress after meditation

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
or a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now.

Cells stop dividing when this gene kicks into high gear, study finds

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Scientists seeking to unlock secrets of cellular aging have identified a gene that triggers senescence, a phenomenon in which cells stop dividing. The gene, called CD36, is unusually active in older, senescent cells. Heightening CD36 activity also caused young, healthy cells to stop dividing, with the effect also spreading to nearby cells in the same petri dish.

New guide for using mechanical stimulation to improve tissue-engineered cartilage

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Tissue-engineered articular cartilage (AC) for repairing cartilage damaged by trauma or disease can be made to more closely mimic natural AC if mechanical stimulation of particular magnitude and duration is applied during the development process.

New World Atlas of Desertification shows unprecedented pressure on planet's resources

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
The World Desertification Atlas by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre provides the first comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of land degradation at a global level and highlights the urgency to adopt corrective measures.

Not junk: 'Jumping gene' is critical for early embryo

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A so-called 'jumping gene' that researchers long considered either genetic junk or a pernicious parasite is actually a critical regulator of the first stages of embryonic development, according to a new study in mice led by UC San Francisco scientists and published June 21, 2018 in Cell.

DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpart

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. This is the first such synthetic enzyme to outperform its natural counterpart -- and it does so by three orders of magnitude.

Mindful movement may help lower stress, anxiety

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Taking a walk may be a good opportunity to mentally review your to-do list, but using the time to instead be more mindful of your breathing and surroundings may help boost your wellbeing, according to researchers who found that while students reported being less stressed while they were on their feet and moving, they received an even greater benefit when they reported also being more mindful.

One year of school comes with an IQ bump, meta-analysis shows

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students' IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMR

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) - the relaxing 'brain tingles' experienced by some people in response to specific triggers, such as whispering, tapping and slow hand movements -- may have benefits for both mental and physical health, according to new research.

Hitchhiking to kill

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
How can elimination of therapeutics from the bloodstream or their early enzymatic degradation be avoided in systemic delivery? Chinese scientists have new developed a method to bind an established cancer therapeutic, floxuridine, with natural serum albumin for its transport and delivery to target cancer cells. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the authors demonstrate the automated synthesis of a conjugated floxuridine polymer, its successful transport and delivery, and its efficiency in stopping tumor growth.

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