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Toxic chemicals in salons, lack of education lead to adverse health effects

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Clients who frequent hair and nail salons exhibit more skin and fungal diseases than those who visit less often and nail salon technicians are receiving inadequate training in the use of chemicals, suggest two Rutgers School of Public Health studies.

NASA looks at rainfall in developing Tropical Storm Kai-tak

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Tropical Storm Kai-tak developed near the east central Philippines as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and analyzed its rainfall.

Little understood cell helps mice see color

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have discovered that color vision in mice is far more complex than originally thought, opening the door to experiments that could potentially lead to new treatments for humans.

Researchers discover how cells remember infections decades later

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
How do immune cells remember an infection or a vaccination so that they can spring into action decades later? Research led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that a small pool of the same immune cells that responded to the original invasion remain alive for years, developing unique features that keep them primed and waiting for the same microbe to re-invade the body.

Researchers identify way to weaken malaria parasites against popular drug treatment

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Indiana University researchers have identified a way to block the ability of parasites that cause malaria to shield themselves against drug treatments in infected mice--a finding that could lead to the development of new approaches to combat this deadly disease in humans.

UNH researchers find effects of climate change could accelerate by mid-century

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Environmental models are showing that the effects of climate change could be much stronger by the middle of the 21st century, and a number of ecosystem and weather conditions could consistently decline even more in the future.

Falling faster: The surprising leap of Felix Baumgartner

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Five years ago the Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner broke the sound barrier during his free fall from an altitude of almost 39 kilometers. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich have analyzed the fluid dynamics of his descent. The surprising result: Baumgartner, with his irregularly shaped equipment, fell faster than a smooth, symmetrical body would have.

Software enables robots to be controlled in virtual reality

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Brown University researchers have developed software that lets users control robots over the internet with off-the-shelf virtual reality hardware.

High success rate reported for diabetic Charcot foot surgery

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Nearly four out of five diabetic patients with severe cases of a disabling condition called Charcot foot were able to walk normally again following surgery, a Loyola Medicine study has found.

Nanoparticle staircase: Atomic blasting creates new devices to measure nanoparticles

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A NIST team used a standard machining technique to fabricate a 'nanofluidic staircase' that allows precise measurement of the size of nanoparticles in a liquid.

Action video games to fight dyslexia

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A study conducted by BCBL, the Basque research center, reveals that action video games improve visual attention and reading ability, two of the deficits suffered by people with dyslexia. The objective is to use the most useful elements of videogames in new software without violent connotations that help to treat this cognitive disorder.

Coloring books make you feel better, but real art therapy much more potent

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Many adult coloring books claim to be art therapy and can reduce negative feelings, but art therapists are significantly more impactful, a Drexel study shows.

Active surveillance of low-risk PMC of the thyroid proposed as first-line management

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A 10-year study of more than 1,200 patients with low-risk papillary microcarcinoma (PMC) of the thyroid led researchers to conclude that close and continuous monitoring is an acceptable first-line approach to patient management instead of immediate surgery to remove the tumor.

Scrap the stethoscope -- engineers create new way to measure vital signs with radio waves

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Cornell University engineers have demonstrated a method for gathering blood pressure, heart rate and breath rate using a cheap and covert system of radio-frequency signals and microchip 'tags,' similar to the anti-theft tags department stores place on clothing and electronics.

Allergens widespread in largest study of US homes

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Allergens are widespread, but highly variable in U.S. homes, according to the nation's largest indoor allergen study to date. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health report that over 90 percent of homes had three or more detectable allergens, and 73 percent of homes had at least one allergen at elevated levels. The findings were published November 30 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

WPI team taking optical device from the lab to the clinic to detect cancer much earlier

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
In a paper in Nature Scientific Reports, researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) show how optical tweezers, which use beams of light to grip and manipulate tiny objects, including cells, can be miniaturized, opening the door to creating devices small enough to be inserted into the bloodstream to trap individual cancer cells and diagnose cancer in its earliest stages. The researchers replaced bulky lenses with optical fibers to make the device smaller and more portable.

Critical toxic species behind Parkinson's Disease is glimpsed at work for the first time

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The key agents involved in spreading Parkinson's Disease in the brain were thought to be too unstable to study in depth, but in new research scientists have both characterized these toxic structures, and established how they 'drill' into the walls of healthy brain cells.

To trade or not to trade? Breaking the ivory deadlock

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The debate over whether legal trading of ivory should be allowed to fund elephant conservation, or banned altogether to stop poaching has raged for decades without an end in sight.Now, an international team including researchers from The University of Queensland and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions is working to break the policy stalemate.

Spaghetti-like, DNA 'noodle origami' the new shape of things to come for nanotechnology

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A team of Arizona State and Harvard scientists has invented a major new advance in DNA nanotechnology. Dubbed 'single-stranded origami,' their new strategy uses one long, thin noodle-like strand of DNA, or its chemical cousin RNA, that can self-fold -- without even a single knot -- into the largest, most complex structures to date.The strands forming these structures can be made inside living cells, opening up the potential for nanomedicine.

An ultradilute quantum liquid made from ultra-cold atoms

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
ICFO researchers create a novel type of liquid one hundred million times more dilute than water and one million times thinner than air. The experiments, published in Science, exploit a fascinating quantum effect to produce droplets of this exotic phase of matter.

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