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After the epigenome: The epitranscriptome

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Today, an article published in Cancer Discovery by Manel Esteller explains that RNA also has its own spelling and grammar, just like DNA. These 'epigenetics of RNA' are called epitranscriptome.

How do metals interact with DNA?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. The lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. An international team of scientists, led by Leticia González from the University of Vienna and Jacinto Sá from the Uppsala University, have developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.

When green means stop

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Optogenetics has revolutionized how researchers investigate cellular behavior and the function of large and interconnected tissues such as the brain. This successful combination of optics and genetics is powered by light-sensitive proteins, many of which have been engineered to bind to each other upon light stimulation. Scientists at IST Austria now expanded the optogenetic protein toolbox. They engineered a receptor that releases binding in green light. This avoids bleaching and toxic side effects of light.

Caught on camera -- chemical reactions 'filmed' at the single-molecule level

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have succeeded in 'filming' inter-molecular chemical reactions -- using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope as a stop-frame imaging tool. They have also discovered that the electron beam can be simultaneously tuned to stimulate specific chemical reactions by using it as a source of energy as well as an imaging tool.

Egyptian ritual images from the Neolithic period

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Egyptologists at the University of Bonn discovered rock art from the 4th millennium BC during an excavation at a necropolis near Aswan in Egypt. The paintings were engraved into the rock in the form of small dots and depict hunting scenes like those found in shamanic depictions. They may represent a link between the Neolithic period and Ancient Egyptian culture.

Major new issue of CVIA on imaging

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) journal has just published a special issue on Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging with Guest Editor Dr. Christopher Kramer of University of Virginia.

Salmon with side effects

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? German and Chilean scientists warning that dissolved organic compounds are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities.

Pollination mystery unlocked by Stirling bee researchers

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Bees latch on to similarly-sized nectarless flowers to unpick pollen -- like keys fitting into locks, University of Stirling scientists have discovered.

Scientific discovery may change treatment of Parkinsons

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When monitoring Parkinson's disease, SPECT imaging of the brain is used for acquiring information on the dopamine activity. A new study conducted in Turku, Finland, shows that the dopamine activity observed in SPECT imaging does not reflect the number of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, as previously assumed.

Alzheimer's disease linked to the metabolism of unsaturated fats, new research finds

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study published in PLOS Medicine's Special Issue on Dementia has found that the metabolism of omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fatty acids in the brain are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Visualizing nuclear radiation

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Extraordinary decontamination efforts are underway in areas affected by the 2011 nuclear accidents in Japan. The creation of total radioactivity maps is essential for thorough cleanup, but the most common methods do not 'see' enough ground-level radiation.

Quadruped robot exhibits spontaneous changes in step with speed

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A research group has demonstrated that by changing only its parameter related to speed, a quadruped robot can spontaneously change its steps.

ATP hydrolysis energy explained through large-scale hybrid quantum/classical simulations

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have succeeded in unveiling the microscopic mechanism of AHE release in water.

Discovery of a novel chromosome segregation mechanism during cell division

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
When cells divide, chromosomes need to be evenly segregated. This equal distribution is important to accurately pass genetic information to the next generation. Abnormal segregation can cause cell death or diseases like Down syndrome and cancer. Filamentous spindle fibers must bind to the chromosome centromere to divide equally. For the spindle fiber to be correctly joined, the chromosome must have heterochromatin. However, the mechanism for forming this structure has not been sufficiently clarified.

People afraid of robots much more likely to fear losing their jobs, suffer anxiety

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
'Technophobes' -- people who fear robots, artificial intelligence and new technology that they don't understand -- are much more likely to be afraid of losing their jobs due to technology and to suffer anxiety-related mental health issues, a Baylor University researcher says.

Brief module effective in teaching hemorrhage control basics to staff in a large workplace

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
A medical team has developed a way to effectively provide a large group of people with basic knowledge and skills to locate and use bleeding control equipment to stop life-threatening bleeding in severely injured people.

Study suggests new way to prevent vision loss in diabetics and premature babies

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, 'Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,' which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants.

Use of mobile app reduces number of in-person follow-up visits after surgery

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
Patients who underwent ambulatory breast reconstruction and used a mobile app for follow-up care had fewer in-person visits during the first 30 days after the operation without affecting complication rates or measures of patient-reported satisfaction, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery.

How does spousal suicide affect bereaved spouse mentally, physically?

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
People bereaved by the suicide of a spouse were at increased risk for mental and physical disorders, suicidal behavior, death and adverse social events, according to a nationwide study based on registry data conducted in Denmark and published online by JAMA Psychiatry.

Loss of spouse or partner to suicide linked to physical, mental disorders

Mar, 03/21/2017 - 22:00
People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for a number of mental and physical disorders, including cancer, depression, herniated discs and mood disorders than those in the general population, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

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