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The cure for chaotic lasers? More chaos, of course

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
An international, Yale-led research team has taken a new approach to stabilizing high-power lasers: They're fighting chaos with chaos.

How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers provide a new explanation for the extraordinary success of the Western corn rootworm as a global maize pest.

One giant leap for wheat

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
'For me, as a functional genomics and genetics researcher, having a continuous and fully annotated sequence for each of the 21 wheat chromosomes is of paramount importance,' says Kostya Kanyuka who, with bioinformatician Rob King, represented Rothamsted Research in the IWGSC.'This will greatly speed up our efforts on identification of agriculturally important wheat genes, including those that would help to combat major fungal diseases.'

Societies release updated guideline for treating adult congenital heart disease patients

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Associated today released an updated guideline for the management of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients.

Previously grainy wheat genome comes into focus

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
An international consortium has completed the sequence of wheat's colossal genome.

Nematode can rebuild muscle and neurons after complete degradation

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
What can scientists learn about human neurodegenerative disease from a major soybean pest? It's not a trick question; the answer lies in the soybean cyst nematode, one of two classes of microscopic roundworms known to lose and then regain mobility as part of their life cycle. A new study from the University of Illinois explains how it works.

Autism linked to egg cells' difficulty creating large proteins

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
New work from Carnegie's Ethan Greenblatt and Allan Spradling reveals that the genetic factors underlying fragile X syndrome, and potentially from other autism-related disorders, stem from defects in the cell's ability to create unusually large protein structures. They found that mutations in the gene Fmr1 create problems in the and the reproductive system. They can lead to the most-common form of inherited autism, fragile X syndrome, as well as to premature ovarian failure.

Under pressure, hydrogen offers a reflection of giant planet interiors

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Lab-based mimicry allowed an international team of physicists including Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov to probe hydrogen under the conditions found in the interiors of giant planets -- where experts believe it gets squeezed until it becomes a liquid metal, capable of conducting electricity.

Presenting the first fully annotated reference genome of bread wheat

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
An international team of researchers has presented a fully annotated reference genome for bread wheat, one of the world's most important and widely cultivated crops.

Can population policy lessen future climate impacts?

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Population has been seemingly left out of climate change assessments, including by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Electrospraying a better desalinization membrane

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Following 30 years during which the membrane hasn't changed much, researchers have introduced a new method for making the membranes used to turn saltwater fresh.

Collective clog control: What ants can teach us about traffic flow

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Observing how ants excavate their narrow underground tunnels provides new insight into how to orchestrate optimal traffic flow in confined and crowded environments, researchers say.

Autoimmunity plays role in development of COPD, study finds

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Autoimmunity plays a role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study led by Georgia State University and Vanderbilt University Medical Center that analyzed human genome information stored in Vanderbilt's DNA biobank.

Stretching beyond limits

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Novel research optimizes both elasticity and rigidity in the same material without the usual tradeoffs

Sprawling galaxy cluster found hiding in plain sight

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
MIT scientists have uncovered a sprawling new galaxy cluster hiding in plain sight. The cluster, which sits a mere 2.4 billion light years from Earth, is made up of hundreds of individual galaxies and surrounds an extremely active supermassive black hole, or quasar.

UTA professor leads federal advisory group on the prevention of acute, chronic pain

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A University of Texas at Arlington professor led a federal advisory group that has published its recommendations on the prevention of acute and chronic pain to the Federal Research Pain Strategy, an interagency committee that oversees the government's long-term strategic plan to support pain research.

New manufacturing technique could improve common problem in printing technology

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A new manufacturing technique developed by researchers from Binghamton University, State University at New York may be able to avoid the 'coffee ring' effect that plagues inkjet printers.

ShareBackup could keep data in the fast lane

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Rice University engineers develop ShareBackup, a hardware and software solution to help data centers recover from failures without slowing applications.

Most wear-resistant metal alloy in the world engineered at Sandia National Laboratories

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Sandia's materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It's 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature's most wear-resistant materials.

Study: The eyes may have it, an early sign of Parkinson's disease

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The eyes may be a window to the brain for people with early Parkinson's disease. People with the disease gradually lose brain cells that produce dopamine, a substance that helps control movement. Now a new study has found that the thinning of the retina, the lining of nerve cells in the back of the eye, is linked to the loss of such brain cells.

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