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First Chikungunya-infected Aedes aegypti mosquitos found in Brazil

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
While more than 13,000 cases of Chikungunya viral disease were reported in Brazil in 2015, scientists had never before detected the virus in a captured mosquito in this country. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have identified a mosquito -- caught in the Brazilian city of Aracaju -- that's naturally infected with the East-Central-South-African (ECSA) genotype of Chikungunya.

Tiny nanoparticles offer significant potential in detecting/treating disease new review of work on exosomes

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Exosomes - tiny biological nanoparticles which transfer information between cells - offer significant potential in detecting and treating disease, the most comprehensive overview so far of research in the field has concluded. Areas which could benefit include cancer treatment and regenerative medicine.

How pythons regenerate their organs and other secrets of the snake genome

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Snakes exhibit incredible evolutionary adaptations, including the ability to rapidly regenerate their organs and produce venom. The Castoe group at the University of Texas at Arlington studied these adaptations using genetic sequencing and advanced computing. Supercomputers of the Texas Advanced Computing Center helped the team identify a number of genes associated with organ growth in Burmese pythons, study secondary contact in related rattlesnake species, and develop tools to recognize evolutionary changes caused by natural selection.

Proton pump inhibitors do not contribute to dementia or Alzheimer's disease

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Noting that the prescription of proton pump inhibitors is on the rise among middle-aged and older adults, a team of researchers designed a new study to examine PPIs and the risk of dementia, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

High fat diet reduces gut bacteria, Crohn's disease symptoms

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have shown a high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation -- a major discovery for patients suffering from Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel syndrome, causes debilitating intestinal swelling, cramping, and diarrhea. The disease affects half a million people in the United States, but its cause is yet unclear.

NASA's infrared and radar eyes in space cast on Tropical Storm Cindy

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Cindy in infrared light to identify areas of strongest storms and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite found locations of heaviest rainfall as Cindy was making landfall along the US Gulf Coast states.

Popular prostate drug linked to serious side effects

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the commonly prescribed Avodart (Dutsteride) may put men at an increased risk for diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and worsening erectile dysfunction.

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't break

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The anchors that hold Venus' flower basket sea sponges to the ocean floor have an internal architecture that increases their ability to bend, according to a new study. Understanding that natural architecture could inform future human-made materials.

NASA's Webb telescope gets freezing summertime lodging in Houston

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope was placed in Johnson Space Center's historic Chamber A on June 20, 2017, to prepare for its final three months of testing in a cryogenic vacuum that mimics temperatures in space.

Holey pattern boosts coherence of nanomechanical membrane vibrations

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute have introduced a new type of nanomechanical resonator, in which a pattern of holes localizes vibrations to a small region in a 30 nm thick membrane. The pattern dramatically suppresses coupling to random fluctuations in the environment, boosting the vibrations' coherence. The researchers' quantitative understanding and numerical models provide a versatile blueprint for ultracoherent nanomechanical devices. Among others, this enables a new generation of nanomechanical sensors to probe quantum limits of mechanical measurements, and more sensitive force microscopy.

White people show race bias when judging deception

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
When making judgments about who is lying and who is telling the truth, new research shows that White people are more likely to label a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, even though their spontaneous behavior indicates the reverse bias. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Uncomfortable summer heat makes people moody and unhelpful, new research finds

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Associate professor Liuba Belkin of Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and Maryam Kouchaki, assistant professor at Northwestern in Evanston, Illinois, conclude in a new study, that when when it's uncomfortably hot, we're less likely to be helpful or 'prosocial.'

Unexpected rotation in a stone-dead galaxy

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
joint European-US study led by experts from Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, reveals a rotating stellar disk à la the Milky Way in a stone-dead galaxy 10 billion light-years from Earth. This has never been shown before. The galaxy examined is an early version of elliptical-shaped galaxies.

On polygamous females and single-parent males

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
On polygamous females and single-parent males Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University are studying ploversMale plovers survive more successfully in the wild than females. Behavioral researchers at Bielefeld University have studied how sex biases develop across the life span of the plover. They report on the consequences of the surplus of males for rearing chicks in the research journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences'.

Negative tweets can trash TV programs for other viewers

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Negative social media comments about a television show tend to lower enjoyment for other viewers, while positive comments may not significantly boost their enjoyment, according to researchers.

Bug spray accumulation in the home

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A newly published article in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reports that pyrethroids, a common household pesticide known to cause skin irritation, headache, dizziness and nausea, persists in the home for up over one year.

The two faces of rot fungi

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Yogurt, beer, bread and specialties such as tasty blue cheeses or good wine -- special microorganisms and refining processes first produce the pleasant flavors and enticing aromas of many foodstuffs. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now investigated the formation of rot in grapes and have shown that when this is caused by certain kinds of mold fungi, the resultant wine can have not only moldy but also floral aromas.

Alzheimer's disease study links brain health and physical activity

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
People at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new UW-Madison study. Results of the research were published today online in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Authenticity key to landing a new job

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
At job interviews, relax and be yourself -- if you're good, being yourself may be the best way to secure a job offer, according to a new study involving UCL researchers.

Diabetes patients still produce insulin

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Some insulin is still produced in almost half of the patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than ten years. Patients with remaining insulin production had much higher levels in blood of interleukin-35, They also had much more immune cells that produce interleukin-35 and dampen immune attacks.

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