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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Ice Age climate caused sediment sourcing 180 in Gulf of Mexico

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The onset of the most recent ice age about 2.6 million years ago changed where the western Gulf of Mexico gets its supply of sediments. The finding adds new insight into how extreme climate change can directly impact fundamental geological processes and how those impacts play out across different environments.

Democratic governors have bold ideas to transform health care: Harvard researchers

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Republican and Democratic governors have strikingly different visions for the future of health care, according to a new analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health. While Republican leaders favor maintaining or shrinking public health insurance programs, Democratic leaders are advancing several new proposals to expand public coverage, including 'public option' and single-payer health reforms.

Poll: Majority of millennials do not like Trump, Twitter

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new national poll of millennials looks at opinions on President Trump, social media, key issues and potential 2020 presidential candidates.

Immune cell clues offer hope to hypertension patients, study suggests

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have pinpointed cells in the immune system that could be key to tackling high blood pressure. The findings also shed light on current medications that could increase risk of the disorder, which affects more than 12 million people in the UK.

Just like flipping a switch -- in only half a picosecond

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is -- watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster.

Researchers create 'shortcut' to terpene biosynthesis in E. coli

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed an artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids, or terpenes, in E.coli. This shorter, more efficient, cost-effective and customizable pathway transforms E. coli into a factory that can produce terpenes for use in everything from cancer drugs to biofuels.

Unintended side effects: antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiome dysregulates skeletal health

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Diet and exercise regulate the accrual of bone mass, but some evidence suggests the microbiome may also play a role. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina examined how the gut microbiome impacts skeletal health and what happens when the system is perturbed. They showed that antibiotic disruption of the gut microbiota induced a pro-inflammatory response that led to increased osteoclast activity and suppressed bone mass accrual in the post-pubertal developing skeleton.

CHOP surgeons find opioids often overprescribed for elbow fractures in children

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Opioid drugs prescribed to children for pain relief after a typical pediatric orthopaedic procedure may be significantly overprescribed, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The patients used less than 25 percent of the drugs, suggesting a potential risk of opioid diversion.

New study shows smoking accelerates aging

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Smoking has long been proven to negatively affect people's overall health in multiple ways. The study shows that the smokers demonstrated a higher aging ratio, and both male and female smokers were predicted to be twice as old as their chronological age as compared to nonsmokers.

Only 13 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions considered appropriate

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Only 13 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions are considered appropriate and 36 percent considered potentially appropriate, according to a new study from Northwestern Medicine, the University of Michigan and Harvard University's Brigham and Women's Hospital.The study provides the most extensive assessment of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions to date and demonstrates the scale of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the US. 

Observations of a rare hypernova complete the picture of the death of the massive stars

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The end of a star's life can occur in a tranquil manner in the case of low mass stars. This is not the case for very massive stars, which suffer such extreme explosive events that they can outshine the brightness of the whole galaxy. A group of astronomers has published a study of the death of a high-mass star that produced a gamma-ray burst (GRB) and a hypernova, in which they have detected a new component in this type of events.

Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends.

How bad will my postpartum depression be in 12 months?

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new Northwestern Medicine study was able to successfully predict -- with 72.8 percent accuracy -- if a new mother would experience worsening depressive symptoms over the first year after giving birth. The scientists predicted this depression trajectory using four maternal characteristics that put the mother at risk. Identifying these factors early in the postpartum period will allow mothers to seek treatment earlier and improve their chance of a full recovery.

Less than half of US youth discuss sensitive topics with their doctors

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Fewer than half of young people in the United States are having discussions of sensitive topics with their regular healthcare providers, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. This new research led by researchers at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health suggests that modifying healthcare delivery practices may improve discussions between youth and their healthcare providers. Youth-provider discussions are important opportunities to promote health for young people.

Breast cancer up to five times more likely to metastasize even 10 years after childbirth

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Breast cancers diagnosed in young women within 10 years of giving birth are more likely to metastasize, and thus more likely to cause death, than breast cancers in young women who gave birth less recently or not at all.

Proteins use a lock and key system to bind to DNA

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have traditionally thought that DNA binding proteins use patterns in the genome's code of As, Cs, Ts, and Gs to guide them to the right location, with a given protein only binding to a specific sequence of letters. In a new study, published in Cell Systems, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that proteins must rely on another clue to know where to bind: the DNA's three-dimensional shape.

Research reveals mechanism for leukaemia cell growth, prompting new treatment hopes

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A mechanism which drives leukaemia cell growth has been discovered by researchers at the University of Sussex, who believe their findings could help to inform new strategies when it comes to treating the cancer.

Drones shown to make traffic crash site assessments safer, faster and more accurate

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Research shows that drones can be more effective and safer in crash mapping of vehicular highway accidents than conventional methods. Drones using new imaging technology developed at Purdue University allows highway safety officers to capture and print 3D composites of crash sites and reduce mapping time and improve traffic flow following a crash by 60 percent.

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
An international team of researchers, including the University of Leicester, found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'.

Artificial intelligence applied to the genome identifies an unknown human ancestor

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
By combining deep learning algorithms and statistical methods, investigators from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), the Centro Nacional de Análisis Genómico (CNAG-CRG) of the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Genomics Institute at the University of Tartu have identified, in the genome of Asiatic individuals, the footprint of a new hominid who cross bred with its ancestors tens of thousands of years ago.

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