Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 1 hora 21 mins

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.

Watch: Insects also migrate using the Earth's magnetic field

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A major international study led by researchers from Lund University in Sweden has proven for the first time that certain nocturnally migrating insects can explore and navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Until now, the ability to steer flight using an internal magnetic compass was only known in nocturnally migrating birds.

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analysed by researchers at the University of Sussex to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes hugely depending on what direction they are looking.

Scientists discover new gene expression mechanism with possible role in human disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
When cells grow and divide to ensure a biological function, DNA must be unwound from its typical tightly packed form and copied into RNA to create proteins. When this process goes awry, the result could be diseases such as cancers. University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers have discovered that a protein called Spt6 facilitates RNA degradation so that cells have just the right amount of RNA for the creation of proteins.

NIH-funded study finds new evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer’s disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Analysis of large data sets from post-mortem brain samples of people with and without Alzheimer's disease has revealed new evidence linking viruses to Alzheimer's clinical traits and genetic factors. Researchers funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, made the discovery by harnessing data from brain banks and cohort studies participating in the Accelerating Medicines Partnership-Alzheimer's Disease (AMP-AD) consortium.

Dying cancer cells make remaining glioblastoma cells more aggressive and therapy-resistant

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A surprising form of cell-to-cell communication in glioblastoma promotes global changes in recipient cells, including aggressiveness, motility, and resistance to radiation or chemotherapy. Paradoxically, the sending cells in this signaling are glioblastoma cells undergoing programmed cell death. The apoptotic cancer cells release extracellular vesicles. These vesicle, or exosomes, carry components that alter RNA splicing in the recipient glioblastoma cells, and this altered splicing promotes therapy resistance and aggressive migration.

Crowding inside cells may influence many functions and major diseases

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A new study finds that mTORC1 controls how 'crowded' human cells become as a person ages.

Is increased BMI associated with reduced risk of premenopausal breast cancer?

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Higher body mass index (BMI), especially in early adulthood, may be associated with reduced risk for premenopausal breast cancer.

Fish's use of electricity might shed light on human illnesses

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
African weakly electric fish, commonly called baby whales, use incredibly brief electrical pulses to sense the world around them and communicate with other members of their species. Part of that electrical mechanism exists in humans -- and by studying these fish, scientists may unlock clues about conditions like epilepsy.

Improved CPR training could save more lives, research finds

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
This Scientific Statement addresses gaps in resuscitation training that lead to flat survival rates for cardiac arrest victims. Standardized online and in-person courses are falling short and not always implemented to optimize retention and mastery. The statement examines best practices in education and applies the learning in new resuscitation science, offering suggestions for improvement in training on eight key elements.

Waking up is hard to do: Prefrontal cortex implicated in consciousness

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Michigan Medicine researchers discover that stimulating the prefrontal cortex can induce wake-like behavior in anesthetized rats.

New study suggests viral connection to Alzheimer's disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A first-of-its kind study, next generation sequencing is brought to bear to investigate a culprit in the path to Alzheimer's disease: the presence of viruses in the brain.

More evidence for controversial theory that herpesviruses play role in Alzheimer's disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
In a large-scale analysis published in the journal Neuron, researchers use data from three different brain banks to suggest that human herpesviruses are more abundant in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and may play a role in regulatory genetic networks that are believed to lead to the disease. This work lends support to the controversial hypothesis that viruses are involved in Alzheimer's disease and offers potential new paths for treatment.

Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity risk, study finds

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Humans have unexpectedly high genetic variation in the receptor for a key pregnancy-maintaining hormone, according to research led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The finding may help explain why some populations of pregnant women have an elevated risk of premature birth.

Bogong moths first insect known to use magnetic sense in long-distance nocturnal migration

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on June 21 have found that nocturnal Bogong moths, like migratory birds, depend on the Earth's magnetic field to guide them on their way. The discovery offers the first reliable evidence that nocturnal insects can use the Earth's magnetic field to steer flight during migration, the researchers say.

Unusually high levels of herpesviruses found in the Alzheimer's disease brain

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Two strains of human herpesvirus -- human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) -- are found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease at levels up to twice as high as in those without Alzheimer's, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report.

Six new species of goblin spiders named after famous goblins and brownies

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
A remarkably high diversity of goblin spiders is reported from the Sri Lankan forests by two researchers from the National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka. Nine new species are described in a recent paper in the open-access journal Evolutionary Systematics, where six are named after goblins and brownies from Enid Blyton's children's books. There are now 45 goblin spider species belonging to 13 genera known to inhabit the island country.

Alzheimer's breakthrough: Brain metals that may drive disease progression revealed

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Alzheimer's disease could be better treated, thanks to a breakthrough discovery of the properties of the metals in the brain involved in the progression of the neurodegenerative condition, by an international research collaboration including the University of Warwick.

Garden seed diet for threatened turtle doves has negative impact

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
New research into Britain's fastest declining bird species has found that young turtle doves raised on a diet of seeds foraged from non-cultivated arable plants rather than food provided in people's gardens are more likely to survive after fledging. Ecologists at the University of Lincoln, UK, investigated the dietary habits of European turtle doves using DNA analysis of faecal samples and found significant associations between the body condition and the source of the bird's diet.

Bisexual men have higher risk for heart disease

Mié, 06/20/2018 - 22:00
Bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors, finds a new study published online in the journal LGBT Health.

Páginas