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Clinics cut pregnancy risks for obese women

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Specialist antenatal clinics for severely obese mums-to-be can help cut rates of pregnancy complications, research has found. Women who received the specialist care were eight times less likely to have a stillbirth and health experts say the clinic helps them to spot signs of complications sooner.

Video games can change your brain

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have collected and summarized studies looking at how video games can shape our brains and behavior. Research to date suggests that playing video games can change the brain regions responsible for attention and visuospatial skills and make them more efficient. The researchers also looked at studies exploring brain regions associated with the reward system, and how these are related to video game addiction.

How pheromones trigger female sexual behavior

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A study by a group of Japanese scientists showed how a male pheromone in mice enhances sexual behaviors in females -- and how it may enhance a different behavior, aggression, in males -- by identifying distinct neural circuits and neurons that generate a particular behavioral response to specific chemical signals. The findings point to a model for further investigating how sex-specific innate behaviors in living things are controlled.

Adulthood wellbeing lower for single-parent kids -- new research

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
People who grew up in single-parent families have lower levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction in adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick.

Custom built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapy

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease.

How protons move through a fuel cell

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals -- a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

Eating your feelings? The link between job stress, junk food and sleep

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Stress during the workday can lead to overeating and unhealthy food choices at dinnertime, but there could be a buffer to this harmful pattern.

Stereotypes still affect females' career aspirations in STEM topics

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Study investigates the impact of stereotypes and the role of family, school and society on the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects and found that these stereotypes do impact the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects.

Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic risk

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A proposed tax on systemically risky financial transactions could reduce the risk of financial system crashes by spurring financial networks to reshape in more resilient ways.

Magnetic memories of a metal world

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Research deciphering the hidden magnetic messages encoded in a rare group of meteorites has helped secure nearly half a billion dollars of NASA funding for a journey to their parent asteroid -- the only known place in the solar system where scientists can examine directly what is probably a metallic core.

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger.

HPV testing leads to earlier detection and treatment of cervical pre-cancer

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Women who receive human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, in addition to a pap smear, receive a faster, more complete diagnosis of possible cervical precancer, according to a study of over 450,000 women by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Select memories can be erased, leaving others intact

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.

Researchers find way to better use current drugs to target cancer

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
The drugs helped to understand the biology. The researchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.

Cleveland Clinic discovers similarities between next-generation prostate cancer drugs

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown for the first time how a class of advanced prostate cancer drugs are processed in the body and how their anti-tumor activity might change depending on how they are metabolized. Their pre-clinical findings, just published in Cell Chemical Biology, may lay the foundation for improving therapies for treatment-resistant, aggressive prostate cancer.

Ecology insights improve plant biomass degradation by microorganisms

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Microbes are widely used to break down plant biomass into sugars, which can be used as sustainable building blocks for novel biocompounds. Getting the right microbial community for this process is still a matter of trial and error. New insights by University of Groningen microbial ecologist Diego Javier Jiménez and colleagues could make a rational design possible. They argue this point in an opinion paper published in the journal Trends in Microbiology on June 22.

Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Universities of Leicester and East Anglia lead research to identify biodiversity through satellite data.

Elevated rate of autism symptoms found in children with Tourette syndrome

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Around one in five children with Tourette syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements and vocalizations, met criteria for autism in a study headed by UC San Francisco. But this prevalence may be more a reflection of similarity in symptoms than actual autism, according to the study's researchers.

Lab grown human colons change study of GI disease

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to research published June 22 in Cell Stem Cell. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers who led the project.

For the first time in a patient, Stanford researchers use long-read genome sequencing

Mié, 06/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Stanford have used a next-generation technology called long-read sequencing to diagnose a patient's rare genetic condition that current technology failed to diagnose.

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