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From emergence to eruption: Comprehensive model captures life of a solar flare

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A team of scientists has, for the first time, used a single, cohesive computer model to simulate the entire life cycle of a solar flare: from the buildup of energy thousands of kilometers below the solar surface, to the emergence of tangled magnetic field lines, to the explosive release of energy in a brilliant flash.

New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the role of yeast, the world's most basic eukaryotic unicellular organism, may pave the way for the development of novel, more effective therapies for congenital diseases.

First international consensus on fibromuscular dysplasia

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The "First international consensus on the diagnosis and management of fibromuscular dysplasia" (FMD) has been published online first today in Vascular Medicine and the Journal of Hypertension.

Research to improve welding process for manufacturing industries

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
New research, led by the University of Leicester, will optimise the welding and additive and manufacturing process

Waiting for the complete rupture

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Nepal was struck by an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.8 in 2015, but the country may still face the threat of much stronger temblor. This is the conclusion reached by ETH researchers based on a new model that simulates physical processes of earthquake rupture between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

Fiery sighting: A new physics of eruptions that damage fusion experiments

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Sudden bursts of heat that can damage the inner walls of tokamak fusion experiments are a hurdle that operators of the facilities must overcome. Such bursts, called 'edge localized modes (ELMs),' occur in doughnut-shaped tokamak devices that house the hot, charged plasma that is used to replicate on Earth the power that drives the sun and other stars. Now researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have directly observed a possible and previously unknown process that can trigger damaging ELMs.

New study finds evidence of changing seasons, rain on Titan's north pole

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
An image from the international Cassini spacecraft provides evidence of rainfall on the north pole of Titan, the largest of Saturn's moons. The rainfall would be the first indication of the start of a summer season in the moon's northern hemisphere.

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition -- for humans.

Army researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Army researchers are exploring the benefits of immersive technology for warfighters. They have developed a platform to assess this technology called AURORA-MR.

Engineered light to improve health, food, suggests Sandia researcher in Nature

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
intentionally controlled light can help regulate human health and productivity by eliciting various hormonal responses. Tailored LED wavelengths and intensities also can efficiently stimulate plant growth, alter their shapes and increase their nutritional value, opening a new world of scientific and technological possibilities for indoor farming.

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race.

New research confirms US Fed right to hold news conferences after every meeting

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A policy intended to increase transparency at the US Federal Reserve may have done the opposite, setting markets up for unnecessary surprises, says a new study from the University of Toronto.

'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A new study uses an analytical technique called 'network science' to determine factors contributing to statistics anxiety among psychology majors.

Combatting brain infections in special issue of Viral Immunology

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A special issue of Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, contains a rich collection of the latest research and reviews focusing on Viral Neuroimmunology and the intricacies of viral brain infection.

Fighting perinatal mood and anxiety disorders on multiple levels

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
An award-winning poster that Lenore Jarvis, M.D., MEd, and colleagues presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Convention and Exhibit in Orlando, Florida, details Children's integrated approach to help women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders which includes actions at individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and policy levels.

Sudden aging

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in conjunction with researchers at La Trobe University in Melbourne prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago.

Athletes should build neck strength to avoid concussions, Rutgers researchers recommend

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Rutgers researchers have proposed a solution for athletes at higher risk for sports-related concussions, such as football and soccer: Protect your head with neck-strengthening exercises in the pre-season.A paper by researchers at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, published in the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, examines previous studies on the role that the neck's strength, size and posture play in reducing concussion risk.

Neurofeedback helps to control learning success

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Those who regulate their brain rhythm themselves can release capacities to learn new things.

Simple rules predict and explain biological mutualism

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have long employed relatively simple guidelines to help explain the physical world, from Newton's second law of motion to the laws of thermodynamics. Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used dynamic modeling and machine learning to construct similarly simple rules for complex biology. They have devised a framework to accurately interpret and predict the behavior of mutually beneficial biological systems, such as human gut bacteria, plants and pollinators, or algae and corals.

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