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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Wearable vision systems reveal more than a 'highway in the sky'

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Significant commercial investment in wearable vision systems for personal communications and entertainment is driving rapid advances in miniature optoelectronics components and consumer-driven applications. A special section in this month's issue of Optical Engineering, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, aims to help boost progress across development in automotive, industrial, and military applications.

Scientists develop test to identify best treatment for gonorrhea

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from UCLA have developed a laboratory test that helps physicians determine which people with gonorrhea may be more treatable with an antibiotic that has not been recommended since 2007 because of concerns that the resistance to the drug was growing.

Social factors of patients affect hospital performance measures

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
A team of researchers led by a University of Colorado School of Medicine faculty member found that measures to evaluate readmission rates at children's hospitals would be more accurate if the social factors of the patients are included.

Two simple building blocks produce complex 3-D material

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Northwestern University scientists have built a structurally complex material from two simple building blocks that is the lowest-density metal-organic framework ever made. Directed by design rules developed by the scientists, uranium atoms and organic linkers self-assemble into a beautiful crystal -- a large, airy 3-D net of very roomy and useful pores. The pores are so roomy, in fact, that the scientists have nestled a large enzyme inside a pore -- no small feat.

DNA vaccine protects against toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
A new DNA vaccine when delivered to the skin prompts an immune response that produces antibodies to protect against toxic proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease -- without triggering severe brain swelling that earlier antibody treatments caused in some patients.

Success of stem cell therapy for diabetes depends on pre-transplant immune condition

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at the Center for Cell-Based Therapy at University of São Paulo (USP) show that the therapeutic effect is relatively short-lived in patients with more autoreactive lymphocytes before treatment.

Pulmonary Thrombosis-on-a-Chip provides new avenue for drug development

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at the Wyss Institute have engineered a model of human pulmonary thrombosis using its Organ-on-a-Chip platform that mimics in vivo blood clot formation and confirms the transmission of inflammatory signals from the pulmonary epithelium to the vascular endothelium, providing a new model for investigation and treatment/prevention of pulmonary blood clots.

New research could help develop drugs to better address heart problems in diabetics

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Research published in Experimental Physiology shows that diabetes-induced changes in heartbeat are primarily regulated by the β1-adrenoceptor. This discovery, once confirmed in humans, may lead to better treatment of heart problems in diabetics by enabling more targeted drugs to be produced.

Cultural backgrounds of media organizations affect international news coverage

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers examined the photographic news coverage of a visit Pope Francis made to Cuba to determine how major media outlets from different countries covered the international event. They found that the cultural values of the photojournalists' home countries affected the ways in which the pope's visit was framed by each media outlet.

Risk of interval colorectal cancers higher among African-Americans

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
An American Cancer Society study of Medicare enrollees finds the risk for interval colorectal cancers, cancers that develop after a colonoscopy but before the next recommended test, is higher for blacks than whites.

New insight into life-threatening childhood brain cancer

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
The most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed.

City life could present psychosis risk for adolescents

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Living in a city could significantly increase young people's vulnerability to psychotic experiences, according to a new study from King's College London and Duke University.

Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.

Intensive blood pressure can reduce risk of harm to heart muscle

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
A new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown that aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension reduced the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This condition, the enlargement and thickening of the walls of the heart's main pumping chamber, is the most common complication of high blood pressure and greatly increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

Researchers suppress fibrosis chemical signal to block haywire healing

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
An injured body always seeks to heal. But that process is far from simple. A host of cells organize to restore what was damaged. Then, critically, the process tapers off. And when it doesn't, the effects can be disastrous. Fibrosis is the thickening and scarring of tissue due to an overactive healing response.

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
University of Illinois geologist Lijun Liu and his team have created a computer model of tectonic activity so effective that they believe it has potential to predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur. Liu, along with doctoral student Jiashun Hu, and Manuele Faccenda from the University of Padua in Italy, published a research paper in the journal of Earth and Planetary Science Letters focusing on the deep mantle and its relationship to plate tectonics.

Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue. The study, which will be published in the June issue of Nature Cell Biology, suggests that this 'microRNA' promotes particularly deadly forms of breast cancer and that inhibiting the effects of this molecule could improve the efficacy of existing breast cancer therapies.

Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren't a myth

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
UA professor Jake Harwood and his collaborators have found that listening to music from other cultures furthers one's pro-diversity beliefs. The findings have important implications for music education, K-12 education and efforts to improve cross-cultural intergroup dialogue and communication.

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
A team of plant biologists and biochemists has produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a tiny, single-celled green alga that could be used as a source of sustainable biofuel and has health implications.

SAEM 2017: EM physicians should stay current on studies to up their critical care game

Dom, 05/21/2017 - 22:00
Reviewing studies can be a tedious task, but one Michigan Medicine physician explains the importance of staying up to date on medical literature, even outside of one's primary field of medicine.

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