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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 16 have found an unexpected difference between men and women. On average, their studies show, men pick up on visual motion significantly faster than women do.

99-million-year-old beetle trapped in amber served as pollinator to evergreen cycads

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Flowering plants are well known for their special relationship to the insects and other animals that serve as their pollinators. But, before the rise of angiosperms, another group of unusual evergreen gymnosperms, known as cycads, may have been the first insect-pollinated plants. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Aug. 16 have uncovered the earliest definitive fossil evidence of that intimate relationship between cycads and insects.

China & UK scientists find coarse resolution models underestimate future Mei-yu rainfall

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
China and UK scientists investigated the effect of model resolution on the mei-yu rainfall projection using the Hadley Centre's latest climate model, HadGEM3-GC2. The investigation highlights the need of high resolution models in future climate change projections.

There's no place like home: study finds home care effective for patients with blood clots

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Study finds that patients with low-risk blood clots may be better off receiving treatment at home versus being admitted to the hospital.

Retinoic acid may improve immune response against melanoma

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
University of Colorado Cancer Center clinical trial results describe a promising strategy to remove one of melanoma's most powerful defenses: By adding retinoic acid to standard-of-care treatment, researchers were able to turn off myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that turn off the immune system, leading to more immune system activity directed at melanoma.

Working memory might be more flexible than previously thought

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Breaking with the long-held idea that working memory has fixed limits, a new study by researchers at Uppsala University and New York University suggests that these limits adapt themselves to the task that one is performing. The results are presented in the scientific journal eLife.

Exercise shown to improve symptoms of patients with chronic kidney disease

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Leicester's Hospitals and University of Leicester lead research into CKD.

Cardiovascular disease related to type 2 diabetes can be reduced significantly

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Properly composed treatment and refraining from cigarette consumption can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease resulting from type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine. In some cases, the increased risks could theoretically be eliminated.

Children put on by robots

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Can robots induce the same social influence and peer pressure as hu-mans do? A new study shows that children adopt a false claim when this is expressed by a group of robots.

Scientists discover new method of diagnosing cancer with malaria protein

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
In a spectacular new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilising a particular malaria protein, which sticks to cancer cells in blood samples. The researchers hope that this method can be used in cancer screenings in the near future.

Internet of Things technology can boost classroom learning and bridge gender divide

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The use of Internet of Things devices in the classroom can have major educational benefits and appeal to both genders if designed and used in the right way, according to new research carried out by the University of Kent.

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), physicist Professor Thomas Schimmel and his team have developed a single-atom transistor, the smallest transistor worldwide. This quantum electronics component switches electrical current by controlled repositioning of a single atom, now also in the solid state in a gel electrolyte. The single-atom transistor works at room temperature and consumes very little energy, which opens up entirely new perspectives for information technology. The transistor is presented in Advanced Materials.

Resistance training and exercise-motivation go hand-in-hand

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A recent study conducted in the University of Jyväskylä suggests that resistance training improves exercise motivation and contributes to making exercise planning among older adults. Exercise motivation and exercise self-efficacy are key factors in continuing resistance training.

There is not one kind of 'good sperm' -- it depends on other qualities in the male

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
In a study published in Behavioral Ecology researchers from Uppsala University show that the same type of sperm is not always the best for all male birds. Depending on how attractive or dominant you are you might be more successful with longer or shorter sperm.

Interactive software tool makes complex mold design simple

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Most of the plastic objects we see are created using injection molding, but designing such molds is a difficult task, usually requiring experts. Now, computer scientists have created an interactive design tool that allows non-experts to create molds for an object of their choice. The software will be presented at this year's prestigious SIGGRAPH conference, as one of IST Austria's five successful submissions.

Smart fluorescent dyes

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Controlling the excited electronic states in luminescent systems remains a challenge in the development of fluorescent and phosphorescent dyes. Now, scientists in Japan have developed a unique organic fluorophore that changes its emission color without loss of efficiency when externally stimulated. The study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie explains this behavior by a simple phase transformation of the solid substance, which could be relevant for optoelectronic applications such as in smart OLEDs.

Stress during pregnancy increases risk of mood disorders for female offspring

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
High maternal levels of the stress hormone cortisol during pregnancy increase anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring at the age of 2, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. The effect of elevated maternal cortisol on the negative offspring behavior appeared to result from patterns of stronger communication between brain regions important for sensory and emotion processing. The findings emphasize the importance of prenatal conditions for susceptibility of later mental health problems in offspring.

Discovery of a structurally 'inside-out' planetary nebula

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC) in Spain, the Laboratory for Space Research (LSR) of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), and an International team comprising scientists from Argentina, Mexico and Germany have discovered the unusual evolution of the central star of a planetary nebula in our Milky Way. This extraordinary discovery sheds light on the future evolution, and more importantly, the ultimate fate of the Sun.

Discovery of a key protein involved in the development of autism

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The protein CPEB4, which coordinates the expression of hundreds of genes required for neuronal activity, is altered in the brains of individuals with autism.

Dominant men make decisions faster

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Men who exhibit high social dominance make faster decisions than low-dominance men even outside a social context, finds a large behavioral study from EPFL.

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