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Visitor patterns and emerging activities in national parks revealed by social media posts

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Social media data provide a reliable information to support decision-making in national parks.

Hydrogen production: Protein environment makes catalyst efficient

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The interaction of protein shell and active centre in hydrogen-producing enzymes is crucial for the efficiency of biocatalysts. A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion in Mülheim an der Ruhr specifically analysed the role of hydrogen bonds in certain enzymes from green algae, the hydrogenases. The groups, which cooperate in the Excellence Cluster Resolv, reported the results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Climate change made Harvey rainfall 15 percent more intense

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Scientists from World Weather Attribution and Rice University have found that human-caused climate change made the record rainfall that fell over Houston during Hurricane Harvey roughly three times more likely and 15 percent more intense.

Researchers track muscle stem cell dynamics in response to injury and aging

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A new study led by SBP describes the biology behind why muscle stem cells respond differently to aging or injury. The findings, published in Cell Stem Cell, have important implications for the normal wear and tear of aging.

Johns Hopkins scientists chart how brain signals connect to neurons

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical's pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

'Bet hedging' explains the efficacy of many combination cancer therapies

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Survival benefits of many cancer drug combinations are not due to drug synergy, but to a form of "bet hedging." Combination treatment gives each patient multiple chances of responding to at least one drug, increasing measures of survival within patient populations. Findings suggest new ways to interpret clinical trial data, identify truly synergistic drug pairings and improve the design of combination therapies.

How defeating THOR could bring a hammer down on cancer

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center uncovered a novel gene they named THOR. It's a highly conserved long non-coding RNA that plays a role in cancer development. Knocking it out can halt the growth of tumors.

How Canada can help protect Canadians from obesity and chronic disease

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
University of Toronto nutritional scientists are leading a study with national experts calling on the Canadian government to outlaw junk food marketing to children, impose stricter limits on unhealthy nutrients added to foods, and impose a 'sugary drink tax.'

Bioengineers imagine the future of vaccines and immunotherapy

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
In the not-too-distant future, nanoparticles delivered to a cancer patient's immune cells might teach the cells to destroy tumors. A flu vaccine might look and feel like applying a small, round Band-Aid to your skin. These are examples of how innovative biomaterials could enhance vaccines against HIV and other infectious diseases and immunotherapies for patients with cancer or dampen responses in autoimmune disorders, allergies and transplanted organ recipients. A review appears in Trends in Immunology.

Sumatran rhinos never recovered from losses during the Pleistocene, genome evidence shows

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
An international team of researchers has sequenced and analyzed the first Sumatran rhino genome from a sample belonging to a male made famous at the Cincinnati Zoo. This study reported in Current Biology on Dec. 14 shows that the trouble for Sumatran rhinoceros populations began a long time ago, around the middle of the Pleistocene, about one million years ago.

Canada's aging population signals need for more inclusive, accessible transportation system

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Older Canadians on the Move is a new expert panel report by the Council of Canadian Academies. The report addresses key obstacles faced by today's older travelers and explores innovative and technological solutions for adapting Canada's transportation system to meet future needs.

Brittle Stars inspire new generation robots able to adapt to physical damage

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The invention of a robot made to adapt to unexpected physical damage is a significant breakthrough for machines made to function in tough environments.

A genetic mutation in the evolution helps to explain the origin of some human organs

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A genetic mutation that occurred over 700 million years ago may have contributed to the development of certain organs in human beings and other vertebrates. This change, a random error in the evolutionary process, facilitated the connection of the gene networks involved in animal embryogenesis. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, was participated in by experts from the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the Department of Genetics from the University of Barcelona Institute of Biomedicine, and the Anton Dohrn Zoological Station in Italy.

Research highlights need for new approach to crippling horse disease

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A new review 'Paradigm shifts in understanding equine laminitis' published in the Veterinary Journal, demonstrates how University of Liverpool led research has changed the way we think about a crippling disease of horses.

New research linking cancer-inhibiting proteins to cell antennae

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Danish researchers have just presented a previously unknown mechanism that inhibits the ability of cells to develop into cancer cells.

Frequent sun exposure may cue gene fusion found in skin cancer

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have determined that a particular fusion gene has a tendency to be found in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) lesions on skin exposed frequently to the sun. The fusion gene is unique to cSCC and appears to be related to frequent sun exposure. It is believed that the work will open doors to a new form of personalized cSCC treatment.

Mild traumatic brain injury causes long-term damage in mice

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
A new Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology study in mice found that mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can precipitate not only acute damage but also a lifelong degenerative process.

Supercoiling pushes molecular handcuffs along chromatin fibers

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
As it squeezes down the chromatin fiber, the cohesin protein complex extrudes a growing loop of DNA -- a bit like the quick-lacing system of trail-running shoes. But what is powering the movement of the protein? A team of SIB scientists has found that the driving force could be the supercoiling of upstream DNA. Their research, published in Nucleic Acids Research, is thereby adding a key piece to the puzzle of gene expression regulation.

HKBU scholars develop new generation of tumor-specific aptamer-drug conjugate

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
The toxic nature of chemotherapy poses a great challenge to clinical treatment of cancer. A team of scholars from the School of Chinese Medicine of Hong Kong Baptist University devoted their efforts to the development of a new generation of smart anti-cancer drug molecules.

Skye high impact: Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strike

Mié, 12/13/2017 - 23:00
Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within the British Paleogene Igneous Province (BPIP), opens questions about the impact and its possible connection to Paleogene volcanic activity across the North Atlantic.

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