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Optical tool monitors brain's circulatory response to pain

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A study reported today in the journal Neurophotonics demonstrates that an optical imaging tool used to monitor regional blood flow and tissue oxygenation may be used to track the brain's response to acute pain in infants, children, and adults. The journal is published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

Scientists follow seeds to solve ecological puzzle

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A four-year study of one rare and one common lupine growing in coastal dunes showed that a native mouse steals most of the rare lupines seeds while they are still attached to the plant. The mouse is a 'subsidized species,' given cover for nocturnal forays by European beachgrass, originally planted to stabilize the dunes.

Weekend surgery has no impact on death risk, study shows

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Day of the week did not affect the survival chances of people undergoing emergency surgery, research in Scotland has found. The findings from the University of Edinburgh challenge the results of previous studies, which had suggested that those who undergo elective surgery at the end of the week are at a greater risk of dying.

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David Attenborough

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
An international team of scientists led by the University of Leicester has discovered a new 430 million-year-old fossil and has named it in honor of Sir David Attenborough -- who grew up on the University campus.

Universe's ultraviolet background could provide clues about missing galaxies

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Astronomers have developed a way to detect the ultraviolet background of the universe, which could help explain why there are so few small galaxies in the cosmos.

China's economic growth could help other developing countries

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Research published today examines China's recent successful economic growth and how this could be applied to help other developing countries grow their economies.

How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorder

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
In a new study, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, University of Cyprus and Stanford University map the complex biological cascade caused by MIA: the expression of multiple genes involved in autism are turned up or down by MIA, affecting key aspects of prenatal brain development that may increase risk for atypical development later in life.

Comet 67P full of surprises, says study led by CU Boulder

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Images returned from the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission indicate the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place during its most recent trip through the solar system, says a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.

Journal of Parkinson's Disease celebrates key breakthroughs

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Amsterdam, The Netherlands, March 21, 2017 - Marking the 200th anniversary of James Parkinson's first published description of the disease that would come to bear his name, the Journal of Parkinson's Disease is proud to publish Milestones in 200 Years of Parkinson's Disease Research. This special issue features commentaries by luminaries in the field, who are responsible for some of the greatest advances in understanding and treating the disease since it was first characterized.

The Lancet Public Health: The global tobacco control treaty has reduced

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
The global tobacco control treaty has increased the adoption of tobacco reduction measures around the world, which has led to a 2.5 percent reduction in global smoking rates, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health.

Transgender college freshmen drink more, experience more blackouts

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A survey of more than 422,000 college freshmen found that students who identified as transgender were more likely than their cisgender peers to experience negative consequences from drinking, including memory blackouts, academic problems and conflicts such as arguments or physical fights.

HIV co-infection influences natural selection on M. tuberculosis

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
While M. tuberculosis has been evolving with humans for thousands of years, HIV co-infections create host immunological environments that this bacterium has not encountered before and could, therefore, be nudging it to evolve new characteristics. Now, an evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis full genome sequences from HIV uninfected and HIV co-infected individuals uncovered specific sites within M. tuberculosis genomes where the bacterium may have been compelled to evolve in response to HIV-1 co-infections.

Gene mutation may be linked to unexplained female infertility

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital and Rice University have uncovered a gene mutation that may provide answers to unexplained female infertility.

Before and after: Unique changes spotted on comet 67p/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A study published March 21, 2017 in the journal Science summarizes the types of surface changes observed during the two years that the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft spent investigating comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Notable differences are seen before and after the comet's most active period --perihelion -- when it reached its closest point to the Sun along its orbit.

Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSe

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Princeton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. This so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications.

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer's disease

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
In some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer's, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain's blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs.

Could OTC medicines be the answer to alcoholism?

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
The study is determining if two over-the-counter (OTC) medications can diminish alcohol abuse in diagnosed bipolar patients.

National Academy of Medicine releases publication on how to improve nation's health system

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
As the nation discusses repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, the National Academy of Medicine today released a publication on crosscutting priorities that provides a succinct blueprint to address challenges to Americans' health and health care that span beyond debates over insurance coverage.

Kavli Lectures: Physical chemistry of polymer networks, CRISPR systems for genome editing

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Advances in understanding polymer networks and CRISPR-inspired genome engineering tools will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.

USC researchers close to identifying crucial gene for human cleft lip and palate

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A group of researchers has found that three siblings born with cleft lip and palate share a common gene mutation associated with the birth defect. The study -- a collaborative effort between the Ostrow School of Dentistry, the Keck School of Medicine of USC, Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the nonprofit Operation Smile -- was published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics.

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