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Coordination chemistry of anions through halogen-bonding interactions

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
While an IUPAC definition of hydrogen bonding was only released in 2011 after decades of discussions in the scientific community, it did not take such a long time to come up with an analogous definition of halogen bonding, following a revival of this interaction in the literature which can be traced back to the early 1990s, Fourmigué, M. (2017). Acta Cryst. B73, 138-139

Sexist and anti-gay jokes: It's all about men feeling threatened

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Why do some men crack sexist and anti-gay jokes or find them funny, while others do not? According to Emma O'Connor, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles, such disparaging jokes are a way for some men to reaffirm their shaky sense of self, especially when they feel their masculinity is being threatened. Interestingly, in such situations men do not revert to neutral jokes or ones containing anti-Muslim sentiments, comments O'Connor.

Milk study improves understanding of age-related diseases

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
A new study on UHT milk is helping scientists to better understand Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type 2 diabetes, opening the door to improved treatments for these age-related diseases.

Level of unconsciousness in brain damaged patients related to body temperature

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Circadian rhythms may play a crucial role in the recovery of consciousness of patients with severe brain injuries, a study published in Neurology.

Health care leaders predict patients will lose under President Trump's health care plans

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
According to a newly released NEJM Catalyst Insights Report, health care executives and industry insiders expect patients -- more than any other stakeholder -- to be the big losers of any comprehensive health care plan from the Trump administration.

In young bilingual children 2 languages develop simultaneously but independently

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
A study of bilingual children finds that when children learn any two languages from birth each language proceeds on its own independent course, at a rate that reflects the quality of the children's exposure to each language. Spanish skills become vulnerable as children's English skills develop, but English is not vulnerable to being taken over by Spanish. Turns out, it's not the quantity of what the children hear; it's the quality of their language exposure that matters.

One in every 15 non-obese older Filipino Americans has diabetes

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
A new study released today found that non-obese Filipino Americans aged 50 and over have a much higher prevalence of diabetes than non-Hispanic white Americans (7.6 percent vs. 4.3 percent). The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto, University of Victoria, and University at Albany, SUNY.

New weapon in fight against antibiotic resistance discovered

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Scientists have designed an antibiotic that could combat WHO priority pathogens by suppressing the energy supply of bacteria

A promising target for kidney fibrosis

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
In a new study published in JCI Insights, investigators report that increasing SMOC2 in the kidney helped initiate and continue the progression of kidney fibrosis, while tamping down SMOC2 prevented it.

Coral reefs struggle to keep up with rising seas, leave coastal communities at risk

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
In the first ecosystem-wide study of changing sea depths at five large coral reef tracts in Florida, the Caribbean and Hawai'i, researchers found the sea floor is eroding in all five places, and the reefs cannot keep pace with sea level rise. As a result, coastal communities protected by the reefs are facing increased risks from storms, waves and erosion. The study, by the US Geological Survey (USGS), is published today in Biogeosciences.

Periodic model predicts the spread of Lyme disease

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks are responsible for the majority of North American transmissions. In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, Xiunan Wang and Xiao-Qiang Zhao present a mathematical model of Lyme disease that incorporates seasonality and climate factors.

Scientists uncover mechanism allowing bacteria to survive the human immune system

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have uncovered molecular details of how pathogenic bacteria fight back against the human immune response to infection.Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Institut de Biologie Structurale (CEA-CNRS-UGA, France) have identified the structure of NsrR, a bacterial protein that binds to DNA and plays a key role in the bacterium's resistance to nitric oxide (NO), which is produced in the initial immune response to infection

How educators could help tackle religious segregation

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Educators could be doing more to address the challenges and obstacles faced by Muslim students in modern times, a new research report published today in the Journal of Language, Identity and Education suggests.

'Eating with the eyes' is hard-wired in the brain

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Japanese scientists at the National Institute of Genetics (NIG) discovered prey detector neurons in the visual system that project to the feeding center in the hypothalamus, and they observed neurons in this circuit firing upon seeing prey. The study demonstrates the presence of hard-wired circuitry that conveys visual information to the center that regulates feeding motivation in zebrafish.

Indigenous peoples mobilize to assert role in alleviating climate change; new policy brief

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Indigenous Peoples, local communities from 30 different countries are demanding respect for their land rights. Despite clear evidence that communities are the best guardians of their lands and the world's forests -- highlighted in a new policy brief -- governments are giving the go-ahead to dams, coal mines, palm oil plantations, and other projects that rob the forests' customary owners of their homes and livelihoods, and threaten the climate and resources we all depend on.

ILC 2017: European countries restrict access to life-saving treatment for hepatitis C

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Data presented today demonstrate that there are considerable restrictions in the reimbursement of DAA therapy across European countries, particularly with respect to the severity of liver fibrosis and prescribing by specialists. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that there was evidence that some countries were not following the most recent European HCV treatment guidelines, published by EASL in 2016.

Investigational DAA treatment combination effective and improves patient-reported outcomes

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Analysis of patient outcome data from the POLARIS-1, 2, 3 and 4 studies demonstrate that patients with HCV and cirrhosis have greatest improvements of PRO scores when taking treatment with sofosbuvir + velpatasvir, ± voxilaprevir, an anti-HCV regimen that has been shown to be safe and effective against all HCV genotypes. The analysis, presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, showed that achievement of SVR12 was associated with improvements in PROs.

UK: Serious liver disease develops in one-third of young people with childhood acquired HCV

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Results from a retrospective review of a UK national HCV database found that over one-third of young people (<18 years old) with childhood acquired HCV develop serious long-term liver disease, 5 percent develop liver cancer and more than 4 percent undergo a liver transplant. The cohort study, presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, revealed intravenous drug abuse as the main route of HCV infection in young people in the UK.

Severe gum disease strongly predicts higher mortality in cirrhosis

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Results presented today from a prospective study in patients with irreversible scarring of the liver (cirrhosis) demonstrates that severe periodontitis (an inflammatory gum disease) strongly predicts higher mortality in this population, after adjustments for various risk factors. The study was presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Worldwide lack of early referral of patients with alcoholic liver disease

Mié, 04/19/2017 - 22:00
Results from an analysis of over 3,000 patients highlights there is significant disparity in the referral of patients with liver disease, and that those with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) are 12 times more likely to present at an advanced rather than early stage. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, showed that in those patients with two causes of cirrhosis, alcohol abuse also leads to a more advanced stage of presentation.

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