Escuelas

EurekAlert!

Subscribe to canal de noticias EurekAlert! EurekAlert!
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Actualizado: hace 1 hora 42 mins

How do plants rest photosynthetic activity at night?

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have identified two proteins that allow plants to respond to changes in surrounding light conditions and thereby make photosynthesis more efficient.

Scientists turn to the quantum realm to improve energy transportation

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Scientists based at the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo, Japan, have designed a more efficient quantum transport system using a creative, yet counterintuitive solution.

Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new UBC research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses.

These tags turn everyday objects into smart, connected devices

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Engineers have developed printable metal tags that could be attached to plain objects, like water bottles, walls or doors, and turn them into 'smart' Internet of Things devices. The tags can also be fashioned into paper-thin control panels that can be used to remotely operate WiFi-connected speakers, smart lights and other smart home appliances. The metal tags are made from patterns of copper foil printed onto paper-like materials and disturb WiFi signals when touched.

NTU scientists discover natural plant-based food preservative

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have discovered a plant-based food preservative that is more effective than artificial preservatives.

Researchers discover key mechanism of DNA replication

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Researchers from Osaka University in Japan have uncovered a key control mechanism of DNA replication with potential implications for better understanding how cells maintain genetic information to prevent diseases or cancer.

Microbial activity in the mouth may differentiate children with autism spectrum disorder

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Research suggests that shifts in bacterial populations within a child's mouth could provide objective biomarkers for identifying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings catalyze development of a novel, saliva-based panel to aid clinicians in earlier diagnosis of ASD. Five ratios of oral microbes distinguished ASD from typically developing children (79.5 percent accuracy), three distinguished ASD from developmentally delayed, non-autistic (76.5 percent accuracy), and three distinguished ASD children with/without GI disturbance (85.7 percent accuracy).

Researchers reveal miscarriage cause, key cellular targets of potential drugs

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered a gene mutation underlying hydrops fetalis -- a fatal condition to fetuses due to fluid buildup in the space between organs. The proteins at the center of this finding have already been implicated in a number of diseases, opening avenues of potential drug discovery related to migraines, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other conditions.

Most Americans accept genetic engineering of animals that benefits human health

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Americans' views of possible uses of genetic engineering in animals vary depending on the mechanism and intended purpose of the technology, particularly the extent to which it would bring health benefits to humans.

Study links mothers' pesticide levels with autism in children

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study from The American Journal of Psychiatry finds that elevated pesticide levels in pregnant women are associated with an increased risk of autism among their children. The study examined levels of DDE (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene), a breakdown product of the pesticide DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). The odds of autism among children were significantly increased in mothers whose DDE levels were elevated (defined as the 75th percentile or greater).

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.

Social position determines pregnant women's exposure to air pollution

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study analyzes the urban exposome of 30,000 women in nine European cities.

Opt-out organ donation register unlikely to increase number of donations

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
An opt-out organ donation register is unlikely to increase the number of donations, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke may increase risk of adult lung disease death

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A new study suggests that long-term exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death in adulthood.

Educational tracking creates artificial inequalities among students

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
New research shows the structure of educational tracking can lead evaluators to favor high over low socioeconomic status students in tracking decisions.

First biomarker evidence of DDT-autism link

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A study of more than 1 million pregnancies in Finland reports that elevated levels of a metabolite of the banned insecticide DDT in the blood of pregnant women are linked to increased risk for autism in the offspring. The study is the first to connect an insecticide with risk for autism using maternal biomarkers of exposure.

Individuals shot by police exhibit distinct patterns of recent prior hospitalizations and arrests

Mié, 08/15/2018 - 22:00
A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that more than 50 percent of people with assault-related or legal intervention (LI) firearm injuries due to law enforcement actions and over 25 percent of individuals with self-inflicted or unintentional firearm injuries were arrested, hospitalized, or both in the two years prior to being shot. The study's findings contribute important evidence that can be used to reduce and prevent these injuries and deaths.

Prenatal exposure to violence leads to increased toddler aggression toward mothers

Mar, 08/14/2018 - 22:00
Babies whose mothers experience interpersonal violence during pregnancy are more likely to exhibit aggression and defiance toward their mothers in toddlerhood, according to new research by Laura Miller-Graff and Jennifer Burke Lefever.

It's okay when you're not okay: A re-evaluation of resilience in adults

Mar, 08/14/2018 - 22:00
Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology closely examined a series of research studies on resilience in adults that report most people are unaffected by adversity. Psychologists Frank Infurna and Suniya Luthar discovered problems with how many of the studies were designed and how the data were analyzed. In a Clinical Psychology Review, the researchers explain the problems and re-evaluate adult resilience research and find that most people struggle to some degree following adversity and then recover after a period of time.

Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

Mar, 08/14/2018 - 22:00
New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet's top group of pollinators.

Páginas