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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Cellular protein a target for Zika control

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A cellular protein that interacts with invading viruses appears to help enable the infection process of the Zika virus, according to an international team of researchers who suggest this protein could be a key target in developing new therapies to prevent or treat Zika virus infection.

Researchers establish principles for transmitting light-delivered data via nonreciprocal circuits

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
In a new paper published in the journal Optica, the flagship journal of the Optical Society, researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (CUNY) lay out a rigorous theoretical framework that clarifies the fundamental principles governing resonant nonreciprocal circuits and resolves some outstanding questions on their potentials and limitations.

Dental study of juvenile archaic Homo< fossil gives clues about human development

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Most aspects of dental development for a juvenile Homo specimen from the Pleistocene fall within the modern human range, according to research by a group of Chinese and international scientists. The results are useful in helping to identify when modern human-like growth and development first appeared.

Study defines differences among brain neurons that coincide with psychiatric conditions

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
It's no surprise to scientists that variety is the very essence of biology, not just the seasoning, but most previous studies of key brain cells have found little variability in a common cell process that involves how genetic information is read and acted on.

Born to run: just not on cocaine

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice -- they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in these mice is serotonin, not dopamine, which is responsible for producing a high.

Ketone body utilization decreases when blood flow to the heart is reduced

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan measured the ketone body utilization rate in the heart and confirmed that it decreases when the heart is in a state of reduced blood flow (myocardial ischemia).

Mosquito known to transmit malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A type of mosquito that transmits malaria has been detected in Ethiopia for the first time, and the discovery has implications for putting more people at risk for malaria in new regions, according to a study led by a Baylor University researcher.

Right green for crop, environment, wallet

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Researchers found an efficient approach to managing nitrogen in agriculture and reducing its environmental impact. It's all about being green.

High pesticide exposure among farmers linked to poor sense of smell later

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
A Michigan State University study is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers.

Scientists grow perfect human blood vessels in a petri dish

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Scientists have managed to grow perfect human blood vessels as organoids in a petri dish for the first time. The breakthrough engineering technology, outlined in a new study published today in Nature, dramatically advances research of vascular diseases like diabetes, identifying a key pathway to potentially prevent changes to blood vessels--a major cause of death and morbidity among those with diabetes.

Feathers: better than Velcro?

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a study by an international team of researchers publishing in the Jan. 16 issue of Science Advances. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties.

Moffitt leads the nation in addressing LGBTQ health care disparities and education

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Moffitt launched the first nationwide survey to identify potential gaps in attitudes, knowledge and institutional practices for LGBTQ patients. The results were published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms. The effect is most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes where the primary limitation on tree growth had been cold temperatures. The research, to be published in Science Advances this week, is the first time that changes in tree growth in response to current climate changes have been mapped at a near-global scale.

Higher risk of fracture in type 1 diabetes may be linked to poor blood sugar control

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Patients with type 1 diabetes and poor blood sugar control face a higher risk of fragility fracture -- any fall from standing height or less that results in a broken bone -- than type 1 diabetes patients with good blood sugar control, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Schizophrenia linked to genetic structural abnormality in adolescent brain

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. Therefore testing for the gene SLC39A8, and brain scans for schizophrenia could predict whether or not someone will develop it -- researchers at the University of Warwick have found.

The pace at which the world's permafrost soils are warming

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Global warming is leaving more and more apparent scars in the world's permafrost regions. As the new global comparative study conducted by the international permafrost network GTN-P shows, in all regions with permafrost soils the temperature of the frozen ground at a depth of more than 10 meters rose by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius between 2007 and 2016 -- in the Arctic and Antarctic, as well as the high mountain ranges of Europe and Central Asia.

How stem cells self-organize in the developing embryo

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
New study uses live imaging to understand a critical step in early embryonic development--how genes and molecules control forces to orchestrate the emergence of form in the developing embryo. The study findings could have important implications for how stem cells are used to create functional organs in the lab, and lead to a better understanding of the underlying causes of gastrointestinal birth defects.

Study finds following heart health guidelines also reduces diabetes risk

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Lifestyle and health factors that are good for your heart can also prevent diabetes, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine that published today in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

When activated, 'social' brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice

Mar, 01/15/2019 - 23:00
Feeding behavior and social stimulation activate intermingled but distinct brain circuits, and activating one circuit can inhibit the other, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford University.

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