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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Ads for low-testosterone treatments benefit sales but not necessarily health

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Direct-to-consumer advertising for drugs to treat testosterone deficiency -- or 'low T' -- increases prescriptions to men for hormone-replacement therapies but may not improve their health, UC Davis physician Richard Kravitz said in an editorial published in the March 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

New drug strategy: Target ribosome to halt protein production

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Researchers have discovered a drug that acts like a wrench thrown into the ribosome, stopping the protein production machinery, but only for a small number of proteins, upending current thinking that drugs targeting the ribosome would cause it to stop production of all of a cell's proteins. UC Berkeley and Pfizer chemists who teamed up to find out how it works suggest that similar drugs that selectively stall the ribosome could therapeutically target specfic proteins.

New drug strategy: Target the ribosome to halt protein production

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
The discovery of a chemical compound that halts the production of a small set of proteins suggests a new drug search strategy: find compounds that target undesired proteins before they even get made; according to a new study publishing March 21 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Jamie Cate of University of California, Berkeley, Robert Dullea of Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development, and their respective teams.

'Geofencing' shows promise in tracking chronic care

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Location-tracking apps on smartphones could be used to help track and manage care for thousands of patients who suffer from chronic diseases, and possibly even provide feedback to them on lifestyle changes that could help, according to an initial assessment by researchers at UC San Francisco.

Vital directions for health and health care

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A new publication from the National Academy of Medicine identifies eight policy directions as vital to the nation's health and fiscal future, including action priorities and essential infrastructure needs that represent major opportunities to improve health outcomes and increase efficiency and value in the health system, according to the article published online by JAMA.

Genetic assessment developed to determine risk for age-associated Alzheimer's disease

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California San Francisco, has developed a novel genetic score that allows individuals to calculate their age-specific risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), based upon genetic information.

Individuals with autism at substantially heightened risk for injury death

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Deaths in individuals with autism increased 700 percent in the past 16 years and were three times as likely as in the general population to be caused by injuries, according to a new study by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The average age at death for individuals with autism was 36 years younger than for the general population, 36 years of age compared with 72.

Initial hospital costs from gunshot wounds total $6.6 billion over 9 years, study finds

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Gun violence resulted in initial hospitalization costs of more than $6.6 billion nationwide from 2006 through 2014 -- an average of $734.6 million per year, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine.

Brain fatty acid levels dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
The researchers found that the levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (linoleic acid, linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, oleic acid, and arachidonic acid) in the vulnerable brain regions were associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Multiple genetic markers combined to estimate risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A risk score derived from genetic data may be able to estimate an individual's risk of Alzheimer's disease at a particular age, according to research published in PLOS Medicine. The polygenic hazard score (PHS) was developed by Rahul Desikan, of the University of California, San Francisco, USA, and colleagues, using genotype data from three large cohorts (totaling over 70,000 individuals) of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and normal elderly individuals.

New study: Pre-pregnancy BMI directly linked to excess pregnancy weight gain

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
It's well known that excessive weight gain during pregnancy can have a lasting negative impact on the health of a mother and her baby.A new University of Michigan-led study finds that for young mothers (women who gave birth between the ages of 15 and 24), pre-pregnancy body mass index, or BMI, and ethnicity might signal a likelihood for obesity later in life.

Antenatal screening in Europe: How to avoid mother-to-child transmission of infections

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Transmission of infections with HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis or rubella from mother to child before and during birth as well as in infancy still occur across Europe -- despite existing prevention methods. A new ECDC report outlines the cornerstones for effective antenatal screening programs across the EU/EEA countries.

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Milling electronic waste into nanoscale particles allows polymers, oxides and metals to be separated for recycling into new products. The process takes advantage of changes to the materials' properties in very cold conditions.

SIB accelerates the fight against diabetes with several pan-European projects

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Recent advances in the fight against type 2 diabetes (T2D) result from a pan-European collaborative project, called IMIDIA, in which the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics is closely involved since 2010. SIB was in charge of both coordinating the large amount of patients' data (acting as Data Coordination Centre, DCC) as well as analysing the data to find biomarkers for early detection of the disease.

States can lower risk of measles outbreak by strengthening exemption policies

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
States with weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them, a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus shows.

Does the universe have a rest frame?

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Physics is sometimes closer to philosophy when it comes to understanding the universe. Donald Chang from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China, attempts to elucidate whether the universe has a resting frame. The results have recently been published in EPJ Plus.

Boys secure in their racial identity seek more diverse friendships

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
Kids often seek answers from parents, friends and media to better understand their racial identity.

Controlling fast X-ray pulses with laser light

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
When hit by light, electrons are excited and begin to move. Ultrafast X-ray pulses may make it possible to watch the motion of these electrons as they move inside and between atoms in a material. Although scientists have gotten much better at making ultrafast X-rays in recent years, controlling them is still notoriously difficult. Researchers at Louisiana State University and Lund University in Sweden have demonstrated a new method to direct short bursts of X-ray light that uses strong laser pulses.

Insulin resistance may lead to faster cognitive decline

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that insulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance.

New species of terrestrial crab found climbing on trees in Hong Kong

Lun, 03/20/2017 - 22:00
A new species of terrestrial crab has been found to climb trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong. Its squarish predominantly dark brown carapace and very long slender legs are what sets it apart from closely related species. The discovery of the tiny crustacean once again proves how little is known about the diversity of these crabs in Hong Kong. The new species is described in the open access journal ZooKeys.

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